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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've used silken tofu and I've used firmbut I have never seen "firm silken"<br><br>
Has anyone used it?<br><br>
I have Lo mein recipe calling for it. Do you think soft tofu would work?<br><br><br><br>
thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I use firm silken tofu in tofu scrambler sometimes, and i use it for baking, in place of eggs.<br><br>
As for your recipe, I don't know. how are you supposed to prepare it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The recipe says mashed- this is for making tofu young patties. I thought soft tofu might be a good substitute.<br><br><br><br>
Silken is good in scrambler? What brand do you use, plntygd?<br><br>
I've only used Nasoya.<br><br>
thanks
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by marg</i><br><br><b>I've used silken tofu and I've used firmbut I have never seen "firm silken"...</b></div>
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There are 2 main types of tofu. Chinese (curd style packed in water) and Japanese (silken style that is in the aseptic packages). Within the 2 main divisions, there are grades of firmness. Soft, firm, extra-firm and this occurs in both silken and curd styles. If you have "firm silken" that simply means that you have the silken style tofu in the firm consistency. I have only used curd style up until very recently, so I don't know if the soft silken will work in place of the firm silken or not. The soft might not hold its shape as well as the firm so that might / might not make a lot of difference in your recipe's end-result.<br><br><br><br>
If you have sucess with your "to-fu young patties", please post the recipe or at least the link. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/drool.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":drool:">
 

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Actually, "silken" and "firm" or "soft" are american continent <b>marketing</b> terms and have little to do with the <b>real</b> differences in tofu in terms of method of making, and historical development of method of making.<br><br><br><br>
The real differences are primarly due to the type of coagulant used. Quite a surprising number of coagulants have been used, but US markets only a few types are popular.<br><br><br><br>
The 2 main surviving traditional basic types are magnesium chloride (made from seawater, and a byproduct of making sea-salt from seawater); calcium sulfate, made from calcium carbonate (made from limestone) and sulfur (another mined mineral), I think.<br><br><br><br>
Magnesium chloride has pretty much been assoc with Japanes, and calcium sulfate with Chinese, but both types have historically been made in both countries, I believe.<br><br><br><br>
Calcium sulfate produces a smoother, less grainy, tofu, but is more toxic than magnesium chloride, in the amounts used for making tofu. Either kind can be dryer or moister, depending upon how heavily and how long it is pressed, after coagulation is completed.<br><br><br><br>
A new type of commericla tofu, coagulated with industrially manufactured (from soybeans) enzymes, has become available. It is cheaper to make than traditional CaSO4 or MgCl tofu. It is generally asceptically packaged. Which includes pasteurization after coagulation, in addition to cooking before coagulation. I find this stuff to be absolutely revolting in flavor and texture, it has an offensive smell, and I much prefer the smell of MgCl tofu, to the faintly rotten-egg smell of CaSO4 tofu.<br><br><br><br>
I believe the mgcl is far superior. It has a gentle, cheerful, appealing aroma. Some people do not like the grainy texture, I much prefer it; it has character. The smooth tofus lack "spring" and have very much inferior mouthfeel, in my opinion, as well as offensive aromas.<br><br><br><br>
Tofu can also be made by coagulating soy milk with lemon juice, vinegar -- there are a myriad of things.<br><br><br><br>
But basicly there are 2 things you need to know about to identify what kind of tofu you have -- the coagulant, and the degree of pressing.
 
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