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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My mom's friend had to move into a place that doesn't allow pets, so my parents and I have been taking care of his two rabbits. He thought it would be temporary, but now he can't take them back. We are trying to find a new home for them, but I don't know the best way to go about it. I don't want them ending up with someone who won't treat them well.<br><br>
I don't know their sex or if they've been spayed/neutered (I just know they haven't been sexing each other). I'm trying to get my mom to ask about their age although her friend doesn't seem to know much about them, because he's not sure about their sex.<br><br>
They're mostly potty trained except they pee on the floor sometimes and they've been known to poo in bad places occasionally. They are very comfortable around humans when they have got used to them and they aren't aggressive. They nibble on people's clothes though. And they chew through wires, tv remotes, etcetera if they have the chance.<br><br>
My plan is to bring them to someone who can determine their sex and if they're spayed/neutered, then put up an ad, but I figured I'd just post here to see if anyone has any advice. This is difficult, because I'm getting attached and I'm worried about trusting someone I don't know. They really are awesome rabbits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There is a House Rabbit Society chapter about an hour away, but I think they have enough rabbits to find homes for as it is. They offer some decent advice on their website, though. Maybe I'll give them a call.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>cornsail</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2997308"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
There is a House Rabbit Society chapter about an hour away, but I think they have enough rabbits to find homes for as it is. They offer some decent advice on their website, though. Maybe I'll give them a call.</div>
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Definitely talk to the HRS. If nothing else, they'll be able to point you to a good rabbit vet, so you can identify their genders and get them spayed/neutered if necessary. Do NOT take them to a vet that isn't a rabbit specialist. A lot of dog and cat vets think they can handle a rabbit, but rabbits are VERY different from dogs and cats in a lot of major ways. For instance, the standard drug used to sedate dogs and cats during a spay/neuter surgery is lethal to many rabbits.<br><br>
But aside from pointing you to good local vets, the HRS will probably also help you find a permanent home for them. But if you can volunteer to keep them as fosters until a permanent home can be found, I'm sure they'd appreciate it.<br><br>
You mentioned that they chew on clothes and chew through things. Get used to it. Rabbits chew, and there's no way to stop it. The best you can do is give them things to chew on instead of the things they shouldn't be chewing on. Hay is the best for that, because it's a healthy food for them, and good for their teeth. But for toys, you can give them cardboard boxes to tear apart, or some types of wooden baskets. Just check the HRS web site for what types of wood are safe for rabbits to chew on. I've given Flash baskets made of timothy hay and willow, and he loves playing with them.<br><br>
--Fromper<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/juggle.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":juggle:">
 

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I volunteer at my local no-kill shelter every Sunday. There's nearly always a couple rabbits or more there, waiting to be adopted. People get rabbits around Easter or when the weather is warm and keep them in cages on their porch or similar, then when the weather gets colder, suddenly they have no plan to care for them. The shelter gets them altered prior to adoption, so that may be an option if you have a willing shelter nearby. Usually if our shelter can't find homes for them after a few months, they start looking to transfer them to a rabbit rescue. Perhaps if you call your local shelter, they know of one or two you could contact. Rabbits are great pets. I had many as a child, and as an old friend put it, they are a lot like vegetarian cats. Easy to box train and very affectionate if you spend time with them. I am sure they will make someone a great pet.
 

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Where are you located? I volunteer at a no-kill shelter here in Chicago that specializes in rabbits- we're pretty full, but I may be able to scrounge up some info/resources for you. You have definitely gotten good advice so far. The House Rabbit Society is a great resource- even if they can't take the rabbits in, they may be able to find someone who can.<br><br>
You will have to rabbit-proof your home- make it so that wires/remotes/etc are inaccessible to them, and block off areas where you don't want them to chew. Cover any wood siding or carpet that they could chew as well. Get them some rabbit chew toys- depending on where you are, you may be able to find some good options at PetSmart or PetCo, but any untreated wood/wicker products work well. Some bunnies will play with balls too, like they make for cats.<br><br>
Bunnies are really easily litter trained, as it is a natural behavior for them. If there is one area outside the cage that they tend to urinate/defecate, put a litter box in that area! They may also be urinating outside the cage because they are not fixed and are marking their territory. Definitely find an exotics vet in your area so you can get them a checkup and spayed/neutered if possible.<br><br>
Good luck- I hope the bunnies find awesome homes!<br><br>
Julie
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the helpful advice.<br><br>
I've decided to take care of them myself. I've gotten too attached and too paranoid about putting them in the care of strangers.<br><br>
We managed to find out they are both 9 month old female rex rabbits. But I'm still not sure if they've been spayed. Apparently it's difficult to tell. But anyway, I'll be looking to find a vet with rabbit experience and get all of that figured out.
 

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Lots of good adviced already. I have found that rabbits aren't as reliable as cats in using a litterbox- but usually it's the solid stuff they leave around, and unlike cat or dog poop, it's pretty innocuous. My rabbit Franz would usually piddle on newspaper if he didn't use the litterbox.<br><br>
My min-rex Hans was a male, but I've gotten the impression that rexes are one of the more responsive, affectionate breeds of rabbits. You might be able to find a good home for them if you change your mind, though. Possibly the HRS chapter would be willing to put someone in your area in touch with you, if they would rather not make an hour-long trip to adopt a rabbit?
 
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