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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
LOL, I couldn't think of a better title for the thread. Sorry... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br>
I'm new here and have a question about fiber dense foods (fruits, veggies, whole grains).<br><br><br><br>
Recently I decided to give a plant friendly diet a try. I won't go so far as to say I've decided to go vegetarian, because my decision has nothing to do with animal rights -- just my own health. And I'm sure I'll slip up and eat something I'm not supposed to sooner or later. But the majority of the time, I would like to avoid animal products.<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, since I started eating fruits & Fiber One cereal, I get horrible cramps and I'm bloated. Is this normal when your body is not used to a high fiber diet? In my mind cramps mean that the food is rotting in my stomach and that freaks me out. Bloatedness makes me think I'm getting fatter. It scares me and makes me want to go back to eating yogurt and tuna.<br><br><br><br>
But if someone can tell me if this is normal or not, I'd be willing to stick it out and see if the discomfort of eating plant based foods stops. It seems odd that my body will digest dairy and fish without a problem but start acting stank when I eat natural food.<br><br><br><br>
I also noticed in another thread that some people mentioned gaining weight when going vegetarian. That kind of scares me a little. I'm kind of curious, if anyone wants to share what they might typically eat in a day. I mean, if I avoid all pasta, rice, bread, nuts, & oils, and just eat fruits, veggies, Fiber One cereal, and the occasional soy milk, surely this would not cause weight gain? I know a calorie is still a calorie, but it seems some foods tend to react differently with the metabolism.<br><br><br><br>
Sorry for the weird post, lol. I do want to eat healthy and not dump toxic food into my system anymore, but I do have a lot of concerns. I figured I would post my concerns on a veggie board before giving up on what seems to be a good lifestyle choice. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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I was just looking at some websites about this and yes, if you drastically increase your fibre intake you may experience bloating, but this will go away pretty soon. It could be a sign that you weren't getting enuf before. Drinking more water will help.<br><br><br><br>
Don't worry about weight gain if you become vegetarian. Personally, I lost weight because before I was eating a lot of steaks and fast food. Now I eat much healthier and feel healthy. I am no toothpick, but I am at an ideal weight. I would not recommend avoiding carbos and nuts (eat small amounts of nuts). The best way to safely lose or maintain weight is to eat a varied diet and eat just enuf food that you need. ie. calories in=calories used up in a day. Most people just pig out too much. IMO the best way to lose unhealthy weight is to stop eating at restaurants. The foods are either loaded with saturated fats or the portion sizes are huge.<br><br><br><br>
Check out the healthy living forum, 'what did you eat today thread' to see what us veggies eat.
 

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If I'm correct, the Fiber One cereal you are referring to is made primarily from using hull part of the grain. This can be difficult to digest, especially if you're used to eating highly processed foods. While you're making the transition in your diet you may want to consider looking for a cereal that uses whole grains. Having the germ, starch, and fiber together will help aid in proper digestion.<br><br>
Make sure that whole grains are first on the ingredient list. Try to buy a cereal that has little or no refined sugars, or hydrogenated oils. Personally, I prefer to make my own cereals, like granola.<br><br>
All calories are not created equal. If you want to eat for your health, look for the nutrient dense foods. The best thing you can do is educate yourself to go beyond just choosing not to eat meat. A lot of vegetarians gain weight because they eat highly processed foods filled with empty calories. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hehe, I'm so dumb. I didn't even think to check the "What did you eat today" thread! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> Forgive my obtuseness. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> I definitely do need to drink more water. I've been slacking lately. I do feel a little better after posting here and will stick with it until my body gets used to it.<br><br><br><br>
But I didn't necessarily eat a lot of meat, processed, and definitely not fast foods before. I would mainly just have Fiber One cereal, oatmeal, tuna, nonfat yogurt, skim milk, baby food, and Slim Fast. Come to think of it, I guess yogurt, milk, & Slim Fast fall into the processed category.<br><br><br><br>
The past few months I definitely have been eating more fats. That's one of the reasons I wanted to give up animal products. After months of eating very little fat, I caved. I figured I could fix this by allowing myself to eat a little more as long as it's mostly plant based. I thought my body would have an easier time digesting fruits & veggies, but this hasn't been the case so far. I guess I just have to be patient. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
Anyway, thanks for the advice! It's much appreciated. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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If you increase your fiber intake, you must drink a lot of water, more than you probably want. Always drink at least a full glass of water after eating anything with a lot of fiber in it. Otherwise, you'll probably feel bloated and maybe even get constipated.<br><br><br><br>
I think people who are vegetarians but still eat a lot of dairy and/or refined carbs and sugars might gain weight, but I've lost a lot of weight since I cut out dairy, refined flour, and refined sugar. Whole foods in fairly frequent small portions is how I eat now, and I'm very happy with my weight and health. Someone can be vegetarian and still eat pizza and cookies all day, which would definitely cause you to gain weight. If you're eating moderate amounts of healthful foods, I wouldn't worry about it.<br><br><br><br>
As for fat, I eat nuts or nut butters almost every day and haven't gained weight because of it. Everything in moderation...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yep, the first ingredient in Slim Fast is sugar. The second ingredient is fructose. In the chocolate variety, the third ingredient is cocoa. Mmmm, lol. I wasn't aware sugar was filtered through animal bones (when I discovered it through checking out this board), but I do know sugar is bad either way. But the total sugar count in 1 scoop is 17g. With 1c of skim milk, the count goes up to 28g sugar. I don't drink Slim Fast anymore, and only used to drink it when I wanted something chocolate. I used to mix it in the blender with 8 ice cubes to tone down the sugar in it. I figure it was better than eating a candy bar or something. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cellulose (a plant fiber) is pretty difficult for humans to digest, so its not unusual for your body to have difficulty adjusting--especially if you haven't eaten many vegetables before.<br><br><br><br>
It will eventually even out, but I find that I still end up bloated sometimes too.
 

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Before we jump to any conclusions, let's get an ingredient list for Fruits & Fiber One.<br><br><br><br>
It may be something else other than fiber, causing the problem.<br><br><br><br>
That said, I don't think eating dry mostly-fiber things -- such as Kellogs All-Bran cereal, is a good idea. Like Baby said, it is better to eat <b>whole</b> grains, which have a nice ratio of fiber to carbohydrates, along with just a little protein and fat, and like Baby said, have the embryo (germ), endosperm (containing starch), and bran layer (consisting mostly of fiber) together. Like for example whole-wheat flakes, Quaker steam-rolled Old-Fashioned (5-minute) oats. Shredded wheat (Barbara's tastes better than Post or Sunshine). Oats have soluble fiber in addition to insoluble fiber -- which may be easier to digest, yet have all the fecal-bulking advantages of insoluble fiber.<br><br><br><br>
Legumes also have soluble fiber. But many also have gas-producing oligosaccarides. Edamame is lower than other beans in oligosaccarides. You might want to make rice-and beans -- the rice counteracts bean-gas, the beans counteract the lack of fiber (even brown rice is pretty low in fiber, has only a little bit more than white rice) in the rice. Stay away from red, black, and brown beans -- the colored skins contain tannic acid -- a stomach acid and potential carcinogen. Get green or white beans.<br><br><br><br>
A good source of fiber is leafy greens -- spinach, green leaf-lettuces or semi-heading lettuces (avoid heavy-heading lettuces, like iceberg), brocolli, brussel sprouts, collards. But take it easy on the brocolli, brussel sprouts and collards -- gas.<br><br><br><br>
Personally I've never had a problem with eating 100% bran cereal like Kellogs All-Bran. But I prefer whole grain cold cereals.<br><br><br><br>
"It seems odd that my body will digest dairy and fish without a problem but start acting stank when I eat natural food."<br><br><br><br>
That's not really surprising, unless you are lactose intolerant. But I think you can digest yogurt if you are lactose intolerant. Anyway, it helps with your intestinal flora, which helps with digestion. Things like collards are indeed gassier than fish. You can't eat too many collards. And I think it's best to mix it with rice, or whatever.<br><br><br><br>
You <b>must</b> have a <b>considerable</b> amount of fats in your diet. Nuts are a better source than beef-muscles. Vegetable oils, not a whole-food product, but just the oil extracted from a whole-food product, should perhaps be used in moderation, if you wish to avoid gaining wait, or perhaps sparingly, if you wish to lose weight.<br><br><br><br>
I don't think tuna is an "unnatural" food. Except for heating it, one generally eats tuna the way it was found in nature. Yogurt however seems rather unnatural. (1) it is made from the milk of non-human mammals -- it doesn't seem natural for one mammal to use the milk of another (2) it is fermented by people, with cultured micro-organisms. Not that I am saying it is harmful, just weirdly unnatural.
 
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