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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since going veg last month, I've felt hungry a lot more often. It's like what I'm eating just isn't filling enough, even though I know I'm eating plenty. I know that vegetables aren't very filling, so I try to get plenty of carbs and beans to fill me up, but it doesn't always help.

I know I'm not under-eating. My weight hasn't changed significantly in over a month since going veg. But even when I've eaten a decent meal, I end up feeling hungry again in an hour.

Any thoughts?

--Fromper

 

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Can you give us a sample diet for a few days and maybe we can help see where it could be improved to keep you fuller longer?
 

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a diet of beans and veggies isn't going to fill you up very much.

eat more complete proteins - packet of nuts or seeds a day which also have plenty of omega's in them. Or Tempeh, Seitan, Quorn.

and complex carbohydrates - banana's, tatties, etc
 

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I remember that having happened a looong time ago when I went veg. Most of it was due to me not knowing just how many food options were out there for me. Some of it I would suspect was just my body adjusting to different food.

If you want to post a food log, we can probably help. Or you can just keep trying new recipes and wait it out.

In the meantime, get yourself some snacks -- nuts, crackers, carrots... whatever. Something to munch on when you get hungry between meals.
 

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You probably need more fat and whole grains. Do you eat rice and pasta? Avocadoes? Adding some nuts to meals helps, too (like peanuts in stir-fries).
 

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Yeah get some fat in your diet. Avacados are really good for many things like spread on toast or just eaten plain. I try to eat veg margarine and toast at every meal. I eat whole grain bread and just keep eating lots of food. Actually its sorta nice eh? Like you can eat tons of food and not gain weight. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hmm. I guess I don't eat much fat. Occasional nuts, but not often. I've been thinking about what I eat, and I was thinking I probably need more carbs. Also, the fact that I usually don't have time for breakfast on weekdays probably doesn't help. I'll try keeping a log for a few days of everything I eat and when I become hungry. Maybe that will help me narrow it down.

Thanks,

--Fromper

 

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Are you eating whole grains? I tend to get ravenous (after lunch, strangely enough) if I don't eat anything before I leave the house.

How about a muffin baked with ground nuts or some granola (not the sugary kind) or muesli flakes with chopped nuts and seeds. Even if you eat them dry straight out of the packet, it's better than nothing. Or make a smoothie with nut butter in the evening, drink half, put half in the fridge for breakfast. If you're feeling ambitious, you can make your own granola or flapjacks.
 

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If you are still hungry, you are either not eating enough food or you are not getting enough nutrients. If you eat a high nutrient density diet, your body will not have hunger pangs, as hunger pangs are from craving nutrients. This is why someone who eats chocolate biscuits all day is still hungry, because their body is crying out for minerals etc. Make sure you drink plenty of water (often thirst is mistaken for hunger), and ensure you sit down and eat 3 good meals a day, plus healthy snacks if you need to. Eat slowly, as it takes 20 minutes for your body to know when you are full, and eat filling foods you like such as pasta, and fill up your plate with extra veggies.
 

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How about your sugar intake? If you are getting too many carbs, particularly sugars, it could trigger a hunger response if your body is not processing all of the sugars due to not having enough other nutrients.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think I've figured out that it's mostly a problem with portion sizes and skipping breakfast. When I'm running late in the morning and skip breakfast, I always end up being hungry in the afternoon, even if I have a good lunch. I'm not sure why that's more noticeable now that I'm veg than it was when I was omni.

Also, I examined my portion sizes, and I think I just haven't been eating as much quantity of food since going veg. I've started doing things for lunch like 2 PBJ sandwiches instead of just 1, larger portions of my leftovers, and skipping the TV dinners that are generally only 9 or 10 oz of food.

You know, given that veg TV dinners cost more than twice as much as the omni version, you'd think they'd be at least as big, but they're not. The biggest veg TV dinners I've seen are the same size as the smallest of omni frozen meals, which I used to avoid because they weren't big enough to be filling. How come there are no "Hungry Man" veg*n meals for those of us who hate to cook?

--Fromper

 

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Why not see becoming vegetarian as an opportunity to change your breakfast/cooking habits?

Instead of skipping breakfast, try having a quick breakfast.

Easy breakfast ideas if you have only 30 seconds or so:

Banana(s)

Oat/granola bar

If you can spare 2 minutes the night before, and maybe 3 minutes in the morning:

Mix soymilk + a handful of quick/instant oats + tsp of nut butter (e. g. almond/hempseed) + maybe some fruit in a strong blender for a breakfast drink.

Mash up soy yogurt + a handful of granola (prefer a variety with nuts + dried fruits, but without added sugar), let mixture soak overnight (easier to eat when still trying to wake up, and easier to digest too).

Microwave porridge still a lot better than no breakfast at all.

Portion sizes somehow made me think of foods high in fiber. For example, instead of just having two PBJ for lunch, add an apple or some baby carrots. And/or have an apple (for example) between meals.

While youre at it, maybe rethink your hate for cooking.

Im not an expert at TV dinners, but 10 oz of food really does not sound a lot. Cant be much veggies/fiber (or nutrients in general) in it, Id assume. If the small veg*n ones are double the price of the normal size omni varieties, they seem to be overpriced too.

And why buy veg*n TV dinners if theyre not even satisfying your appetite or nutrient needs.

Preparing your own fresh meals doesnt necessarily mean you have to buy a dozen recipe books, stroll over the farmers market, and spend your nights chopping tons of veggies, stirring in three pots at a time, etc. Thats fine for those of us who enjoy doing so, but if you dont, try buying frozen veggies, rice and pasta, and canned beans for a start.

There are quite a few veg*n frozen veggie mixes (and countless plain frozen veggies, one sort per bag) available even where I live, so I guess there are some dozen varieties of veggie mixes available at the average US grocery store. Get some of these mixes, plus a few veg*n sauces and some spices. Use for stirfrys, or just steam and serve with a little (e. g., olive) oil over (brown) rice or pasta, or just with some wholefood bread. Add more protein in the form of (canned) beans/chickpeas, tofu, veggie burgers or hot dogs. Always make sure you add a fair amount of good (poly- and mono-unsaturated) fats (e. g., canola, olive, and flaxseed, hempseed oil for omegas). Try sprinkling stirfrys for example with crumbled cashews, sesame seeds, or hempseed nuts for a change and more nutrients. You could even bring leftovers for lunch the next day, for a change from that PBJ.

Or search the web for veg*n chili "sin carne" recipes (there should be like 3 zillions), cook a big quantity and freeze (just use freezer bags if youre not quite at the point where youd think about investing in tupperware
). Try making your own hummus (if you can operate a can opener and a blender [good investment for any veg*n!], you can make hummus at least the canned chickpeas kind). If you make a ton (which should last for about a week with me, heheh
), freeze in 1-cup portions or so to always have some at hand.

Hungry Man veg*n meals can be that easy. You really dont have to transform into the new veg*n chef on the block
to prepare yourself something nutritious and tasty.

Good luck!
 

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Great post Quinoa.

I agree with the learn to love to cook really simple meals thing.

It makes things cheaper, and just a little more time consuming.

I rarely spend more than 10 mins actually cooking.

The reason why: My ricecooker.

I just throw the rice in and let it cook for 40 mins (brown rice). That takes all of a minute to do. I also make extra for the next couple of meals.

Then about 10 mins before the rice is done, I throw together some frozen or possibly even fresh veggies together with a protein source.

My 6 minute lunch this afternoon was nuking some frozen brussel sprouts, and serving them over brown rice with raw cashews, and and for the sauce I just took a spoonful of thai green curry paste that I had in my fridge, added a little water, nut. yeast and braggs. Then I ate it. And it was good, and filling.

The combo of whole grains, veggies and protein fills me up for way longer than anything else.

You can also do things like Quinoa and couscous as a grain base, and they only take about 5 minutes to cook.
 
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