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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone explain this to me? I don't get it. I guess for dogs, a veg*n diet wouldn't be harmful, because they're omnivorous. But I was looking on some vegan product website for makeup and I saw vegan catfood? Cats are carnivores. Every cat, in the history of history, has been built for a carnivorous diet. I'm all for humans not eating animals, because we have a choice and we're built in a way that a plant-only diet sustains us. Humans are not predators, we have to cage and drug our animals. Kitties are predators. They don't think, "Hey, it's not nice to eat this bird". They eat it because that's what their body tells them they need. If feeding your pet meat (or live insects, like in the case of lizards and amphibians) bothers you to the extent that you want to restrict their diet, get an herbivorous or omnivorous pet! Bunnies, birds, dogs, etc. are fine pets.

That's my thought. But I'd really like to know if any of you do this? If you do, could you please explain your reasoning? I really don't understand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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Originally Posted by imdead-goaway View Post

If the vegan petfood doesn't affect the cat (whether it does or not, I don't know, thus "if"), I don't see what the problem would be.
Most of the cats throughout history weren't the domesticated kitties we have now. If we can raise them without meat, why not?
Domestication doesn't affect the bodily structure of the animal. Even domesticated kitties act as predators, that's something you cannot get rid of. Thus, the diet will remain mostly unchanged. Anyone who has ever let their cat outside before has been treated to the "gift" of a killed bird or mouse. This is a predatory instinct, to kill. Obviously, domestication hasn't eradicted instinct. The instinct is why cats GO for meat, their body structure is why they survive off of it. Try feeding kitty carrots at every meal and she'll balk. Plus, if you try feeding her a meatless diet, and let her out, she'll continue to hunt if her health permits, and if it doesn't allow, don't think she won't try. No matter how badly a human wants to force their lifestyle on their animal, there are some animals who cannot live healthily off of just plant matter. For a truly vegan kitty, one would have to keep the animal inside at all times (which is also a direct contradiction of cat life) to prevent hunting. If such an animal did not suffer health issues I would be shocked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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Originally Posted by imdead-goaway View Post

I don't think the point of the food is to quell the cat's urge to kill, or to instill our morals onto it. The point is that we're not supporting an industry that mass murders animals. Cats killing birds and mice... it happens. But cows, sheep, fish, etc., getting killed for profit is contrary to vegetarian lifestyle. It's not natural for a cat to be eating cat food - that s*** doesn't exist in nature. If we're filling a dish with dry food, we might as well buy one that doesn't support the meat industry.
Completing disregarding the other half of my point that cats' bodies are designed to be sustained on meat, and meat only. Neglecting to provide it for them is a compromise of their nutrition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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Originally Posted by ashlend View Post

Well, I feed my cat meat, but I do also keep her inside. And I totally disagree that that is a bad idea. It's much safer for her that way, and we provide her a varied environment with lots of toys, things to scratch, etc. and a decent sized house which she has the run of.

I realize this wasn't really your main point, but cats can live healthier and longer if they're not allowed out.

ETA: a brief summary of some of the reasons can be found here. http://www.peta.org/living/companion...door-cats.aspx
This is more a matter of opinion. All my cats were allowed indoors and outdoors, and they lived a long time. We only had one accident that resulted in my kitty breaking her hip, but she healed right up and is perfectly healthy and energetic. Domesticated or not, cats are predators and for that reason I think they need to be able to go outside. Toys and a big house don't equate to fresh air and chances for stalking live prey. The 'safety' concern to me is moot, because all safety is an illusion. My kitty could have just as easily broken her hip inside my house as she did outside. Cats are perfectly capable of taking care of themselves outside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
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Originally Posted by zirpkatze View Post

in my opinion, cats need to be fed meat. also, i think would be best in theory for cats to have access to the outdoors but in the modern world that's mostly not a good option anymore.

i'm curious, what specific things do you feed your cats?

i'll have to disagree. cats are far more prone to injury outside because there's more dangers that they're exposed to. outdoors there's speeding cars, poisons, cat/animal haters or abusers, territorial cats, dogs, other predators, etc that are not an issue indoors. an indoor only cat isn't free of all danger but there's far fewer sources, especially compared to an indoor/outdoor cat that's exposed to both sources.
how did your cat break her hip? when you say she "could have just as easily broken her hip inside" what sorts of common accidents inside would cause a cat to break a hip?
My cat doesn't live with me at the moment, because I'm staying with my parents and they rent a house that doesn't allow cats. She's with my grandmother, and I don't know the specific brand but I know she only gets wet food.

And my cat broke her hip because she fell and didn't manage to land correctly. She fell off our two foot high porch, which is something she could have done inside (falling off the couch or my bed, for instance).

And again, I believe this is more a matter of opinion. I don't think she's in very much danger outside, no more than inside. So I migh as well let her out, because she's designed to be outside. I've had LOTS of cats, with no problems except for Grecie breaking her hip. But disagreeing over whether letting kitty outdoors is a good thing or not isn't directly relevant to this thread.
 
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