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<a href="http://www.vegetus.org/essay/aexp.htm" target="_blank">http://www.vegetus.org/essay/aexp.htm</a><br><br><br><br>
Check it out. It's long but you'll have the gist of it in a short time I expect. Forgive the off-topicitude, everybody...
 

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Even if the diet contains the nutrients required, that is not sufficient, as one would also need to show that there aren't any harmful effects (maybe problems related to how the food is absorbed, or how the body reacts to it, etc.). To what extent has this been shown?<br><br><br><br>
The existence of healthy vegan cats isn't a good reason to conclude that the diet is healthy.<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, if a proponent of veganism for cats accepts that cats are carnivores and that veganism for cats probably isn't the most well-researched subject, he/she should at any rate admit that, generally, trying a well-balanced vegan diet for cats involves a greater risk of harm to the cat than a well-balanced meat-including diet for cats.
 

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I understand the questions and concerns, Sevenseas, but I'd like to add...<br><br><br><br>
Veganism for humans hasn't been researched thoroughly at all either, to be honest. There are not many studies out there, and they are not large scale. And of many nutrition studies that come out (for humans) about meat and cholesterol and dairy and such - they are frequently conflicting, to say the least. (And re. cats and diet research - there are lots of things that haven't been researched adequately - like, beef isn't really natural to a small cat's diet. Salmon meal isn't natural. We act as though the make-up of one meat is the same as any other, which is not the case. How do the hormones in meat affect them? And what about what's in the by-products of most commercial foods? Etc. But people feed their animals these things all the time).<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, the proponents of cats and veg*nism also promote monitoring the animal's health with bloodwork and such. The author of Obligate Carnivore discusses that should be done. So that takes some effort and expense that not everyone is willing to do or can do. The way that companion animal research needs to be done, in my opinion, and not just for ethical reasons, is by people bringing in their pets and collecting data from these animals as they live their "normal" lives, with the diets that their guardians feed them.<br><br><br><br>
But all I would say is that people should research it before writing it off. I don't think a cat's life is inherently worth more than a chicken's suffering in a battery cage, or a pig's in a gestation crate - and as vegans we should be looking into ways to reduce suffering where possible. That's why I can imagine that people who don't feel comfortable with a 100% veg*n diet for cats for whatever reason might consider some compromise in which they cut down, but don't feel they're taking any risk with that particular animal's health. Anyway, I think it's good for people to at least consider the issue seriously (with the seriousness that taking one animal's life to feed another deserves) and with an open mind, if one is in the position to make the choice for companion animals, whether one ultimately goes forward with it or not. And I understand that this is not an easy issue for anyone who has concern for both companion animals and "food animals." I want people to treat all animals with the care that they deserve.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>brahmacharya</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
We should all keep each other posted on this...don't you think? If this does work it would be a great thing to keep the momentum going. I'd be interested in hearing anything from anyone that had a vegan cat, even if it is negative, so I can figure this out.</div>
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My mother has two beautiful vegan cats. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> They've been vegan for a little over 2 years now. She initially started them on a 25 veg : 75 non-veg ratio, and gradually increased the proportion of veg food over the weeks. They're doing very well now (knock on wood!).<br><br><br><br>
If I remember correctly, Artichoke47's cat was prone to urinary tract infection, so she didn't do well on an all-vegan diet. Artichoke made a compromise and fed her a 50-50 diet, on which I believe she is doing great.<br><br><br><br>
I think the first vegan parents took a risk in putting their children on a vegan diet, but had they not taken that risk, future generations would have very little confidence in vegan diets for children. I'm grateful for the risk they took, and I believe this situation is not dissimilar.
 

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That's great, Veggirlie! Inspiring and helpful. I assume that your mom supplements their diets somehow...does she use anything brand-name that we might be able to find online, or wherever? Meow meow meow...
 

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I think she does use an enzymes supplement, probably from the vegancats site. In fact, I'm reading their FAQs now, and they recommend some 'Good Digestion' enzymes to facilitate the transition to a veg diet. I'll have to ask Mom what she uses!<br><br><br><br>
And meow back at ya! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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brahmacharya:<br><br><br><br>
Mom just e-mailed me -- she uses the Enzymes PH powder. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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