VeggieBoards banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So no store near me carries vegan parm so I'd thought I'd make my own. So what's everyones favorite recipe? Also can you used roasted nuts/seeds if you instead of raw? I ask because some recipes toast them anyways so why not by preroasted and skip that step... at least that was my thoughts.

TIA
Audrey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
This is a great question. I know of one, but I have to find the recipe. It has walnuts in it. I can't wait to hear all of the ideas.

Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
I do not recommend toasting nuts if you don't have to (e.g., if you're mixing it in, it's probably unnecessary).

I usually use almond meal, salt, citric acid, and a touch of vinegar for flavour, but I've mixed that with ground sunflower seeds for bulk too. 50%-50% almond to sunflower seeds works pretty well.

The reason I mix in sunflower seeds is because they're cheaper. 100% sunflower seed, however, tastes too strong; a mix pulls off a good combination of taste and price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
the one we make is 3 TB almond meal, 3TB nutritional yeast, 1/2 tsp (smoked) sea salt Whiz it up in a food processor and store in the fridge. We love it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spidergrrl View Post

the one we make is 3 TB almond meal, 3TB nutritional yeast, 1/2 tsp (smoked) sea salt Whiz it up in a food processor and store in the fridge. We love it.
I'm going to try this one today, since I have almond meal in the house. Also, Trader Joe's sells almond meal really cheap ( for anyone who doesn't know).

Thanks, Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Almond meal isn't like almond flour is it? I don't want to get the wrong thing when I go to the store because I can only go once a month.

Audrey
 

·
Give peas a chance
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Sesame seeds, salt, nutritional yeast. I don't measure things out. I mill the seeds in a handheld coffee grinder, and mix it all together.

Veganomicon has a recipe, but I think it is a little lemony. Here is my photo of that:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by audretoburrito View Post

Almond meal isn't like almond flour is it? I don't want to get the wrong thing when I go to the store because I can only go once a month.

Audrey
The almond meal from TJ's is more like a fine breadcrumb. That's why it's good for breading, too. I believe you'll find it in the baking section near the pancake mixes and syrups.

Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by audretoburrito View Post

Almond meal isn't like almond flour is it? I don't want to get the wrong thing when I go to the store because I can only go once a month.
Audrey
It's the same thing, although depending on brand it may be more finely ground as a flour; it won't generally affect your recipes.

There's quite a bit of variation in types of almond meal, but I've never found any significant differences when it comes to application.

When you shop for almond, just check the price per pound- whether flour or whole almonds. It's very easy to turn whole almonds into almond meal with a few thirty second pulses in a food processor.

If you want to save a bit of money, I suggest cutting the almond meal/almond flour with raw sunflower seeds (also ground up in a food processor, with no shells of course). They're generally much cheaper per pound, and I have been able to mix in about 50% sunflower seeds without negatively affecting the taste or consistency.

Save about 25% of the cost. Particularly important if you're covering a big vegan pizza in the stuff, or using it for layers in a lasagna (yum).

EDIT: If you're cooking for non-vegans (or even some vegans) go a bit easier on the nutritional yeast; not everybody likes it very much. I like it, but I think 50% nutritional yeast is a bit extreme for my tastes- I'd go with 25% max, and maybe more like 10%.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo View Post

Sesame seeds, salt, nutritional yeast. I don't measure things out. I mill the seeds in a handheld coffee grinder, and mix it all together.

Veganomicon has a recipe, but I think it is a little lemony.
Sesame seeds are phenomenal; and that's a great way to grind them up. I'd steer clear of using them with omnivores, though, since raw sesame has slightly bitter tone. It's a taste I love (sesame just isn't right without that light bite), but most omnivores do not like it unless they are accustomed to Mediterranean foods.

Regarding excessively lemony cheese: Use anhydrous citric acid instead. You can get it in the bulk section of whole foods- it's just a white powder. It's sour, without the extra lemon taste. Just be careful with it, because it's pretty intense.

It'll also save you a fortune in lemons- if you want the lemon taste in something, you can still use citric acid and stretch a single lemon out to ten or twenty by zesting it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
OK, these all sound wonderful, but can anyone say if their version tastes REALLY close to parmesan cheese? Just asking.

Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven815 View Post

OK, these all sound wonderful, but can anyone say if their version tastes REALLY close to parmesan cheese? Just asking.
Laura
Nutritional yeast definitely does not taste close to Parmesan. Without nutritional yeast, almond meal tastes -well- kind of like almond.

If you want it to taste really close, you'll have to experiment a little bit.

1. Mix several kinds of nuts and seeds so that the flavour of one of them doesn't dominate the mix.

2. Avoid nutritional yeast- it tastes more like cheddar than Parmesan; it will over-power the mix with the wrong (albeit delicious) taste.

3. Parmesan is very Umami, so adding MSG might help.

4. Parmesan is flavoured with aromatic acidic/putrid products of bacterial (rather than fungal) fermentation. You can produce these at home, but it's kind of a gamble.

First you need to get some Bacillus subtilis (bacterium). You can buy it, or you can try to catch it.

If you try to catch it, you might be able to go outside and pick some grass, and rinse the grass off in a little water (keep the water). It should have plenty of B. subtilis in it. If you buy it, just add that directly (you might be able to use Nattō as a starter- that's made with B subtilis, and it would be safer than grass- some probiotics also have it in them).

Mix flour (pretty much any grain flour would be O.K.) and water (with the B. subtilis) in a shallow pan; a couple cups of water and a couple cups of flour. You want it to get plenty of air, but you DON'T want any mold to fall in it... so, try to cover it with a paper towel or something that will keep the mold spores out, but still allow it to breathe a bit.

Leave that for a few days, and it should start smelling like putrid stinky feet. The flour and the water will separate (with a layer of liquid on top)

It's kind of like playing the lottery, to get the right spores and bacterial starter- and to avoid the toxic molds. If you see any mold spots growing, you may have to start over. Mycotoxins can be bad news.

Anyway, if you get it to smell about right, there should be liquid at the top (clear, slightly yellow). Pour off that liquid into a sauce pan, and slowly bring it to a simmer. Boiling the water should kill pretty much everything except the B. subtilis endospores (which themselves shouldn't be harmful), although it won't destroy residual mycotoxins if there was any mold there (it will destroy any botulism toxins, though).

Add salt to the boiling water to dissolve it.. and any MSG at that time. If you have a cup of water, try maybe four tablespoons, half salt and half MSG perhaps.

When the liquid cools, mix it with your nut flour. Add enough nut flour to where it absorbs all of the water and becomes a bit crumbly... with a cup of water, this will probably be two cups of nut flour. Crumble it out across a large cookie sheet, and leave it somewhere to dry out a bit.

That *should* get you in the right ballpark taste-wise. Fermentation is never completely without danger, though... so if you try that, be careful.

You could also just buy Butyric acid, which is what you are producing by fermenting the flour/water mix with B. subtilis- but I'm not sure if the Butyric acid is produced in a vegan way (I've read that old cheese is used as a starter sometimes). There are probably completely vegan sources available, but I couldn't tell you where to look.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by vepurusg View Post

Nutritional yeast definitely does not taste close to Parmesan. Without nutritional yeast, almond meal tastes -well- kind of like almond.

If you want it to taste really close, you'll have to experiment a little bit.

1. Mix several kinds of nuts and seeds so that the flavour of one of them doesn't dominate the mix.

2. Avoid nutritional yeast- it tastes more like cheddar than Parmesan; it will over-power the mix with the wrong (albeit delicious) taste.

3. Parmesan is very Umami, so adding MSG might help.

4. Parmesan is flavoured with aromatic acidic/putrid products of bacterial (rather than fungal) fermentation. You can produce these at home, but it's kind of a gamble.

First you need to get some Bacillus subtilis (bacterium). You can buy it, or you can try to catch it.

If you try to catch it, you might be able to go outside and pick some grass, and rinse the grass off in a little water (keep the water). It should have plenty of B. subtilis in it. If you buy it, just add that directly (you might be able to use Nattō as a starter- that's made with B subtilis, and it would be safer than grass- some probiotics also have it in them).

Mix flour (pretty much any grain flour would be O.K.) and water (with the B. subtilis) in a shallow pan; a couple cups of water and a couple cups of flour. You want it to get plenty of air, but you DON'T want any mold to fall in it... so, try to cover it with a paper towel or something that will keep the mold spores out, but still allow it to breathe a bit.

Leave that for a few days, and it should start smelling like putrid stinky feet. The flour and the water will separate (with a layer of liquid on top)

It's kind of like playing the lottery, to get the right spores and bacterial starter- and to avoid the toxic molds. If you see any mold spots growing, you may have to start over. Mycotoxins can be bad news.

Anyway, if you get it to smell about right, there should be liquid at the top (clear, slightly yellow). Pour off that liquid into a sauce pan, and slowly bring it to a simmer. Boiling the water should kill pretty much everything except the B. subtilis endospores (which themselves shouldn't be harmful), although it won't destroy residual mycotoxins if there was any mold there (it will destroy any botulism toxins, though).

Add salt to the boiling water to dissolve it.. and any MSG at that time. If you have a cup of water, try maybe four tablespoons, half salt and half MSG perhaps.

When the liquid cools, mix it with your nut flour. Add enough nut flour to where it absorbs all of the water and becomes a bit crumbly... with a cup of water, this will probably be two cups of nut flour. Crumble it out across a large cookie sheet, and leave it somewhere to dry out a bit.

That *should* get you in the right ballpark taste-wise. Fermentation is never completely without danger, though... so if you try that, be careful.

You could also just buy Butyric acid, which is what you are producing by fermenting the flour/water mix with B. subtilis- but I'm not sure if the Butyric acid is produced in a vegan way (I've read that old cheese is used as a starter sometimes). There are probably completely vegan sources available, but I couldn't tell you where to look.
Eeeeewwww! No thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So you have to use raw nutts and or seeds right? Is there a paticular reason preroasted nutts or seeds won't work? I ask because I go to Winco and I'm nut sure they have raw nutts... maybe seeds I never looked. I do know they have unsalted roasted cashews. Eather way I'll check out their bulk bins.
Thanks
Audrey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
All you can do is try it w/ roasted seeds. It can't hurt. Just make very little in case you don't like it. My sister makes it w/ walnuts, nutr. yeast, and sea salt and it is excellent.

Laura
 

·
Give peas a chance
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by vepurusg View Post

Nutritional yeast definitely does not taste close to Parmesan. Without nutritional yeast, almond meal tastes -well- kind of like almond.

If you want it to taste really close, you'll have to experiment a little bit.

1. Mix several kinds of nuts and seeds so that the flavour of one of them doesn't dominate the mix.

2. Avoid nutritional yeast- it tastes more like cheddar than Parmesan; it will over-power the mix with the wrong (albeit delicious) taste.

3. Parmesan is very Umami, so adding MSG might help.

4. Parmesan is flavoured with aromatic acidic/putrid products of bacterial (rather than fungal) fermentation. You can produce these at home, but it's kind of a gamble.

First you need to get some Bacillus subtilis (bacterium). You can buy it, or you can try to catch it.

If you try to catch it, you might be able to go outside and pick some grass, and rinse the grass off in a little water (keep the water). It should have plenty of B. subtilis in it. If you buy it, just add that directly (you might be able to use Nattō as a starter- that's made with B subtilis, and it would be safer than grass- some probiotics also have it in them).

Mix flour (pretty much any grain flour would be O.K.) and water (with the B. subtilis) in a shallow pan; a couple cups of water and a couple cups of flour. You want it to get plenty of air, but you DON'T want any mold to fall in it... so, try to cover it with a paper towel or something that will keep the mold spores out, but still allow it to breathe a bit.

Leave that for a few days, and it should start smelling like putrid stinky feet. The flour and the water will separate (with a layer of liquid on top)

It's kind of like playing the lottery, to get the right spores and bacterial starter- and to avoid the toxic molds. If you see any mold spots growing, you may have to start over. Mycotoxins can be bad news.

Anyway, if you get it to smell about right, there should be liquid at the top (clear, slightly yellow). Pour off that liquid into a sauce pan, and slowly bring it to a simmer. Boiling the water should kill pretty much everything except the B. subtilis endospores (which themselves shouldn't be harmful), although it won't destroy residual mycotoxins if there was any mold there (it will destroy any botulism toxins, though).

Add salt to the boiling water to dissolve it.. and any MSG at that time. If you have a cup of water, try maybe four tablespoons, half salt and half MSG perhaps.

When the liquid cools, mix it with your nut flour. Add enough nut flour to where it absorbs all of the water and becomes a bit crumbly... with a cup of water, this will probably be two cups of nut flour. Crumble it out across a large cookie sheet, and leave it somewhere to dry out a bit.

That *should* get you in the right ballpark taste-wise. Fermentation is never completely without danger, though... so if you try that, be careful.

You could also just buy Butyric acid, which is what you are producing by fermenting the flour/water mix with B. subtilis- but I'm not sure if the Butyric acid is produced in a vegan way (I've read that old cheese is used as a starter sometimes). There are probably completely vegan sources available, but I couldn't tell you where to look.
You rule.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo View Post

You rule.
Thanks. Let me know if you try it; it's actually pretty easy. You can also just leave a mix of flour and water out, and there's a probably 90% chance that it will be overrun by B. Subtilis in three or four days. It's pretty much everywhere.

You can also capture Penicillium molds to make cheese. I've even done that by accident; but you have to be careful about exactly which mold you've caught as some are toxic.

If you have time on your hands, you can do something like this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ascomycetes.jpg

Catching molds in dishes on a nutrient substrate and allowing them to mature to the point you can identify them more properly. Then you can just keep that mold as a pet (feeding it regularly) and harvest little bits of it to get your cheese started.

As long as your desired mold is the dominant species in your container, it can take care of itself and keep anything else out by outnumbering the opposition and starving/poisoning it.

You can also just buy pure strains of molds or bacterium cultures on the internets, just search for "Starter culture" for cheese, or specifically the strain you want (like Penicillium Roqueforti). Unfortunately, most of these packets contain things like lactose- I don't know how much luck you would have finding a vegan starter.

Just make sure you read up on any strain before using it. Penicillium Roqueforti, for example, produces PR toxins which build up and then break down after about three weeks because they react with amino acids- if your cheese is short on protein (such as if it is coconut or starch based rather than nut/soybean based) this could make you very sick or kill you.

So yeah, fermentation can be nutritious, but just play safe
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top