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Yesterday, I was in the library and I flipped through an encyclopedia. The article about vegetarianism was, needless to say, rather irritating. First off, it said that there are exactly three types of vegetarians: lacto-ovo-vegetarians, lacto-vegetarians, and vegans. Never mind those of us (like myself) who don't really fit any of these catagories, either you're a full-fledged vegan or you have to consume dairy products! Not to mention that it added that vegans abstain from other animal products, including gelatin. Funny, I thought that vegetarians in general weren't too keen on gelatin.


But that's not the part that really bugged me. Further into the article, it mentioned that there are no plant sources of complete protein (soy beans and quinoa must be a figment of our imagination) and then proceeds to trot out the age-old myth of protein-combining.

It also explains that they must be careful to eat plenty of broccoli and leafy greens to get calcium. Now, while I think it's nice that they acknowledge non-dairy calcium sources, is this really necessary? The way it was phrased had some definite "MILK = CALCIUM" subtext to it.

The sad thing is that this was a very up-to-date encyclopedia that was printed last year. But their article on vegetarianism looks like it hasn't been updated in decades.
 

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I agree, that is quite sad. It goes to show the power of the mass media and the dairy and meat industry lobby. The writers and editors of this article probably assumed those things to be such ingrained truths that they never even considered to fact check.
 

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Vegetarians do tend to avoid gelatin, but it's not considered meat so it's not necessarily considered not vegetarian. There are many vegetarians who don't even realize what it is and so they don't avoid it.

I'm surprised about the "broccoli and leafy greens for calcium" statement. I was expecting it to say "broccoli and leafy greens for iron". Iron deficiency is a more common problem in veg*ans than calcium or protein deficiency.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandcuffedAngel View Post

Vegetarians do tend to avoid gelatin, but it's not considered meat so it's not necessarily considered not vegetarian. There are many vegetarians who don't even realize what it is and so they don't avoid it.
Gelatin is not vegetarian. (Unless you're talking about the non-animal derived variety.) But yes, there are still many vegetarians who eat it. I would make a distinction between foods that are vegetarian and foods that people who claim to be vegetarian might eat. If eating a non-vegetarian food makes a person a non-vegetarian is a matter of debate, I suppose. Some people just don't care about "trace ingredients" as they call it. Personally, I do (at least to a certain extent), but I don't think it's right to demand that they stop using the vegetarian label for that reason.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaded Candiru View Post

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The sad thing is that this was a very up-to-date encyclopedia that was printed last year. But their article on vegetarianism looks like it hasn't been updated in decades.
Well is it possible to contact them and politely explain the terms and where they have gone wrong.....they probably would appreciate it

Dont know what country it was produced in , but maybe you could contact the veg/society of that country and bring it to there notice, so they could contact them and get the terminology right .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandcuffedAngel View Post

I'm surprised about the "broccoli and leafy greens for calcium" statement. I was expecting it to say "broccoli and leafy greens for iron". Iron deficiency is a more common problem in veg*ans than calcium or protein deficiency.
Psh, most people probably couldn't name a single food that's rich in iron if you asked them. All they know is that meat means protein, milk means calcium, and bread means carbs, but you're not supposed to eat too many of those because you'll get fat.


Of course, these is an encyclopedia staff, so they should at least know better than to continue printing a scientific myth (protein-combining) that was debunked decades ago and has even been disavowed by the person who popularized it.

BTW, the encyclopedia in question was World Book.
 

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I heard that gelatin is not just made from hoofs, but also horse ligaments. I could be wrong, or I'm just late on that news. Haha, I wouldn't eat gelatin, but I consume dairy products. I can't believe they were able to publish that part. That is crazy. They need to get all their information straight. What encyclopedia was this?
 

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Originally Posted by criticizedveggi View Post

I heard that gelatin is not just made from hoofs, but also horse ligaments. I could be wrong, or I'm just late on that news.
Gelatin isn't made out of hooves (which are mostly keratin), it's made by boiling bones, hide, and connective tissue to seperate the collagen. It's not really restricted to any particular species except in kosher gelatin, which is either made without pig or only from fish, depending on whether or not it's going to be used with a dairy product. Yes, horse parts do occasionally get boiled down into gelatin.

BTW, gelatin was used in glues before it became popular as a food. The association between horses and gelatin, particularily glue, probably comes from this. Horses sent to the slaughterhouse usually weren't intended as food (at least in English-speaking countries), so they were mostly used for making glue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by criticizedveggi View Post

What encyclopedia was this?
World Book.
 

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I would definitely contact World Book, with the details of what edition, volume, etc you were reading, and point out the mistakes. Maybe give them an authoritative source that they should consult for more detailed information. I can't imagine that they wouldn't change it once they realize the mistake.

--Fromper

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaded Candiru View Post

Gelatin isn't made out of hooves (which are mostly keratin), it's made by boiling bones, hide, and connective tissue to seperate the collagen. It's not really restricted to any particular species except in kosher gelatin, which is either made without pig or only from fish, depending on whether or not it's going to be used with a dairy product. Yes, horse parts do occasionally get boiled down into gelatin.

BTW, gelatin was used in glues before it became popular as a food. The association between horses and gelatin, particularily glue, probably comes from this. Horses sent to the slaughterhouse usually weren't intended as food (at least in English-speaking countries), so they were mostly used for making glue.

World Book.
Ewwwwwwwwwww... I'm going to tell everyone I know about gelatin now. Thanks!
 
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