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A puppy euthanized by veterinarians has risen from the "dead."
The black-and-white pooch was one of five young dogs "put to sleep" Saturday at a shelter in Sulphur, Okla., News 9 in Oklahoma City reported. Each dog was checked and confirmed to be dead, then the 3-month-old and his four siblings were placed in a trash bin.
On Sunday morning, an animal control officer looked into the bin and discovered that the one pup somehow survived.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...#ixzz1FT6jk2E3
Great that he gets a second chance. Sad that the others will not.

I'm thinking I want my next dog from a high kill shelter.... Poor babies.
 

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Why would a shelter, I use the term loosely, kill healthy puppies? How does this happen? I have such a hatred for human beings today. I'd like to put most of them to sleep. I feel overwhelmingly sad that his sibling died in vain.
 

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I noticed the article said hundreds of people called to adopt the puppy. Why can't these same people adopt hundreds of other pups from this shelter?
 

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Originally Posted by sallyomally View Post

I noticed the article said hundreds of people called to adopt the puppy. Why can't these same people adopt hundreds of other pups from this shelter?
i hope they did after reading this story and not getting that one puppy
 

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The article did very briefly state they "had an illness" which I assume was hookworm since thats what Wall-E is being treated for. Its so sad - I know at the shelter I used to volunteer at, puppies were the easiest to adopt out. I wonder how many adult/senior dogs they put down if they had to put down these puppies.

I hope people (good people) will look at adopting other shelter dogs if they can't adopt Wall-E.
 

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I have mixed feelings about this story. Yes, it is kinda cool the dog still gets to live and have a loving home, however the fact that he was not properly euthanized disturbs me. If the dog was still alive, some of the others might have been too and died slow deaths in the trashcans. Or even worse what if no one noticed (maybe it happened in the past) the live dog and it was forced to die trapped in a trashcan.

This shelter's euthanization process needs to be addressed, someone is not doing their job correctly.
 

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Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post

I have mixed feelings about this story. Yes, it is kinda cool the dog still gets to live and have a loving home, however the fact that he was not properly euthanized disturbs me. If the dog was still alive, some of the others might have been too and died slow deaths in the trashcans. Or even worse what if no one noticed (maybe it happened in the past) the live dog and it was forced to die trapped in a trashcan.

This shelter's euthanization process needs to be addressed, someone is not doing their job correctly.
I agree.
 

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I worked for several years in a high intake open admission shelter. I agree that they need to review their procedures for euthanasia and ensure they are administering and dosing it correctly.

To answer the question about why they do it, its because there are too many people who let their animals breed and there are more animals than there are homes. It rips your soul apart to have to choose to euthanize a healthy animal because there isn't anyone to care for them.

I used to think that euthanasia was cruel, that the person/shelter just gave up on the animal. Then I became involved as a shelter worker and an animal cruelty investigator. What I saw the animals endure was far worse than death. Many died slowly from starvation, untreated injury, disease and neglect. What options did they have? If good homes would adopt them, then believe me, they would be adopted. But when there are not enough homes either to foster or adopt and the shelter is full you have three choices:
1. to take in more animals than the shelter can handle and let the animals suffer in overcrowded cages where they often fight and eventually face an outbreak of disease that results in more suffering and death;
2. to turn away animals in need and leave them to suffer in the streets or in abusive situations and eventually after a life of hardship, die a slow and painful death, unloved, hungry, alone; or
3. to end their suffering through euthanasia where most of the time they are treated with compassion and respect. I have seen situations where people who are not animal lovers are doing that job and as hard as it is for us animal folks to do, I think it is in the animals' best interest if someone who cares is there. The times I have found out about careless procedures is when it is done by an uneducated/untrained person who is collecting a paycheck. Their work at the shelter is just another job and they would be just as happy working as a sanitation worker or DMV clerk as they would helping at the animal shelter.

"I ask for the privilege of not being born ... not to be born until you can assure me of a home and someone to protect me, and the right to live as long as I am physically able to enjoy life ... not to be born until my body is precious and men have ceased to exploit it because it is cheap and plentiful."
~ Mrs. Huntington Smith

Please don't litter, neuter your critter.
 

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Please don't litter, neuter your critter.
Word. On the whole post. I'm not against "kill" shelters. It's an unfortunate reality.

Besides, then you've got the nutty "no-kill" rescues going in, selectively taking animals out of "kill" shelters, and then making it so amazingly difficult to adopt one of their animals that it really puts people off of adopting at all. It's insane.

Don't hate on "kill" shelters. Most likely, they're doing the best they possibly can for the animals they take in.
 

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In high-intake shelters it is not uncommon to euthanize young animals who might otherwise be adopted in other areas of the country. Some shelters intake hundreds of animals per month.
 

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Shelters with minimal funds can not affort to spend a lot on any given animal. They look at the number of lives than can save with the least money and effort. A place like that may have had several litters of similar age and cuteness. There simply isn't enough homes for all those puppies. They had to decide which ones would take the least time, effort and money to find homes for. It's not unusual for pregnant females and litters of puppies or kittens under 6wks to be euthanised, takes too till they can be adopted out.

It does make me question their euthanasia techniques, probably gas chamber to be efficient. Maybe it needs to be backed up with another method to be sure.

Can you believe these kittens lasted 6 weeks in a high kill shelter? And then were placed on the euthanasia list? They were about 6-8wks old when they got to the shelter.
Attachment 14757 Attachment 14758
If kittens like this couldn't get homes, how do you expect all puppies to?
LL
LL
 

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What? Hook worm is so easily treated! I don't understand this either. I hope that puppy's being adopted out and given another chance.

Fwiw, I had my older dog euthanized a few yrs ago , she was suffering from cancer and arthritis, she was 17. The euthanization was basically a drug first that calms them, then the drug that ends their life. My dog was very calm when she went, and seemed to drift into sleep. The vet assured me it was not painful at all, and she seemed at peace. We were with her the whole time. It was sad and awful, but I was glad she was not suffering and in pain anymore...
However, she was a very old, sick dog. These are puppies!! Why wouldn't they be adopted out Again, hookworm is easily taken care of with a shot, I believe.
 

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Originally Posted by Belinda66 View Post

These are puppies!! Why wouldn't they be adopted out Again, hookworm is easily taken care of with a shot, I believe.
Read the posts above yours. In many/most parts of the country, there are simply many more homeless animals than there are openings in shelters. Healthy animals are being killed by the thousands daily because there is no one willing to take them.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheekywhiskers View Post

Can you believe these kittens lasted 6 weeks in a high kill shelter? And then were placed on the euthanasia list? They were about 6-8wks old when they got to the shelter.
Attachment 14757 Attachment 14758
If kittens like this couldn't get homes, how do you expect all puppies to?
Oh, I believe it. Those mostly-black tortoiseshell cats are especially difficult to adopt out. We have a local no-kill that refuses to take in tortoisehells because they simply cannot place them. Yes, I am being completely serious. Another nearby county shelter has ceased taking cats at all because they have so many cats and such a low adoption rate. When I went there to adopt my cat, they had all of the cages full and probably 12-15 cats just running around on the floor. It was nuts.
 
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