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Are Y and W vowels? (in English)

  • Yes, Y and W are both vowels

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • neither one are vowels

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  • yes for Y, nay for W

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • yes for W, nay for Y

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Sometimes they are, sometimes they aren't

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<<prepares to hear her sweetie eat his words.
 

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English speakers think W is a vowel or that Y is a consonant?

Now that is just ... disturbing.
 

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Y is a vowel, W is a consonant, ****damnit. Any grammar book claiming otherwise should be headed for the flames.
 

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How can a letter sometimes be a vowel and sometimes a consonant? It shows a total lack of backbone!
 

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Y sometimes acts as a vowel and sometimes as a consonant. It shows versatility, IS, not lack of backbone.
 

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I've never heard anyone question whether or not w was a consonant and only a consonant before. Where did you hear otherwise, IS?

I wanted to vote that Y is a vowel and sometimes a consonant.
 

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wtb word with no vowels but a 'w'.

wlk

wrt

rwt

clw

until some word is given as proof: y is vowel/consonant. w is a consonant only
 

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I mean, if we are going to start turning all soft sounding letters into vowels, lets make L's M's N's and H's "sometimes-vowels" too.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by troub View Post

wtb word with no vowels but a 'w'.

wlk

wrt

rwt

clw

until some word is given as proof: y is vowel. w is not.
Abbreviations and acronyms don't count.
 

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The sounds /y/ (or IPA /j/) and /w/ as in "yes" and "west" are glides or approximants. They are consonant versions of the vowels /i/ and /u/. In English spelling, <y> is sometimes used to spell /i/. <w> is used to spell /u/ in "cwm" and possibly some other Welsh borrowings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by ynaffit View Post

The sounds /y/ (or IPA /j/) and /w/ as in "yes" and "west" are glides or approximants. They are consonant versions of the vowels /i/ and /u/. In English spelling, <y> is sometimes used to spell /i/. <w> is used to spell /u/ in "cwm" and possibly some other Welsh borrowings.
There ya go...

I know I must not be the only American here who learned the chant re: "A E I O U, sometimes Y and W". Our teachers could never give us a w word though. My dad, English geek extraordinaire though, knew of cwm, a word which comes in handy in Scrabble occasionally.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamJen View Post

There ya go...

I know I must not be the only American here who learned the chant re: "A E I O U, sometimes Y and W". Our teachers could never give us a w word though. My dad, English geek extraordinaire though, knew of cwm, a word which comes in handy in Scrabble occasionally.
Whoa, they taught you that?
 
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