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Discussion Starter #1
I've been thinking of trying my hand at eggplant lasagna, but I've been told that you have to make sure to prepare the eggplant right or it won't cook right. Does anyone have any tips on preparing eggplant?
 

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I've never heard of soaking in salt water. I've done the salt while draining, but don't bother with that anymore.
I do peel! The skin seems to be the bitter part, unless they;re the baby ones.
I tried a white eggplant once and it was terrible. I don't know if it a coincedence or not?
 

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I have never tried it with eggplant but make it with courgette a lot and it works great to leave the peel on, slice it and then leave the slices on a clean kitchen towel for 30 mins or so to draw out the moisture before "assembling" the lasagna. Maybe the same thing would work for eggplant?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have never tried it with eggplant but make it with courgette a lot and it works great to leave the peel on, slice it and then leave the slices on a clean kitchen towel for 30 mins or so to draw out the moisture before "assembling" the lasagna. Maybe the same thing would work for eggplant?
What is courgette?
 

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Here is what Classical Turkish Cooking by Ayla Algar has to say about eggplant preparation:

p. 279

Keep in mind that eggplant must be cooked thoroughly until it is meltingly soft and tender, whether it is fried, roasted, or braised. Occasionally I encounter in restaurants a piece of eggplant that is half cooked and therefore rubbery, hard, and tasteless. With eggplant, chefs must put aside the principle of cooking al dente.

Roasting and frying are the most suitable methods for cooking eggplant. Even when braised or stewed with other ingredients, frying lightly beforehand improves its taste considerably. Sprinkling with salt or soaking in salted water for a while and then rinsing and drying to rid it of all the moisture before frying greatly reduces the amount of oil the eggplant will absorb.
p. 280

To fry eggplant slices, regardless of their ultimate use, simply sprinkle with salt and let stand for at least 30 minutes (they will become discolored), or let them stand in salted water (at least 3 tablespoons salt to 6 cups of water) for the same amount of time, covering with a heavy object to keep them submerged. Rinse thoroughly and squeeze dry to remove as much moisture as possible before frying. This procedure is particularly important for large eggplants, which absorb more oil than small ones.
There is more information in the book about how to roast an eggplant. It's not a vegan cookbook, but there are quite a few dishes in there that are vegan or can easily be made vegan.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here is what Classical Turkish Cooking by Ayla Algar has to say about eggplant preparation:

p. 279



p. 280



There is more information in the book about how to roast an eggplant. It's not a vegan cookbook, but there are quite a few dishes in there that are vegan or can easily be made vegan.
Awesome thanks!
 

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Ooohhh... I learned something new today!
The Brits (and I think others?) also use a certain four-letter misogynic word I'd slap someone for using, so if you see it, don't judge till you know where they're from! :rolleyes:
 

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The Brits (and I think others?) also use a certain four-letter misogynic word I'd slap someone for using, so if you see it, don't judge till you know where they're from! :rolleyes:
I'm not sure what you mean. Did I do or say something offensive?
 

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I'm not sure what you mean. Did I do or say something offensive?
No! LOL! Since we were on the subject of what Brits call things I threw that in. The word is c___ and used more like ***** would be in the US. A group I joined was using it lot!
 

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I've been thinking of trying my hand at eggplant lasagna, but I've been told that you have to make sure to prepare the eggplant right or it won't cook right. Does anyone have any tips on preparing eggplant?
Remove the skin, or you can cook with the skin, its very tough.

Cut the eggplant into 2 or 4 pieces elongated pieces (from top to bottom). If its a large egg plant 4 pieces, if its like chinese eggplant then 2 pieces. Put it on a baking sheet (wax paper), and make sure your oven is on convection (400 degrees fahrenheit).

Cook for 20-45 minutes, depending on your oven, you will know its cooked once it is so soft your fork can cut threw it.
Then you add it to your dish :)

During the baking process I also season it with salt, turmeric, pepper, and a bit of oil.
 

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If you grow eggplants try including a long skinny asian variety.
I like Ping Tung. Harvest at 6-8" and theres no bitterness, no need for salt, and you dont have to peel. Just slice them in half the long way, chop them up, and cook it some before layering into the lasagna.
I ran out of Ping Tung eggplant before I ran out of lasagna noodles and now the noodles are just there, taunting me.
 
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