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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, all. I've been using the Ener-G Egg replacer when I bake, and it's been working wonderfully. However, I recently got a very nice vegetarian recipe book as a gift, and some of these recipes call for the yolk of an egg, or a beaten or whisked egg as an ingrediant. For example, a recipe for Vichyssoise (a soup made of potatoes and leeks) calls for an egg yolk. This might be a silly question, but will Ener-G suffice as a replacement? Or should I use something else? It seems to me that the Ener-G is best used for baking, but maybe I'm wrong. For recipes like soup, maybe I can just skip the use of an egg altogether without it making much of a difference. *shrugs*

I don't care how tempting some of these recipes look, I will not eat eggs! I need some advice from some of the awesome cooks here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've been using Ener-G Egg Replacer for over a year now and JUST noticed recently that there's instructions on its use for "unbeaten eggs", "egg whites beaten stiff", and "egg yolks". I can't believe it! LOL. Look at the box.
 

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Egg-replacer is often some kind of starch.

Potato-starch or Corn-starch and you could try Agar-Agar, Arrow-root or Kuzu.

What you need to use depends on what you make: some of these will only work when they are cooked.

Soft tofu is also sometimes used.
 

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what do you do for eggs in bread ovens? there is a recipe for sticky buns that i loved when i ate eggs, but now i don't know how to make them without eggs. I don't use the ener g egg replacer, i use 2 tbsp flour, 1 1/2 tsp oil, 1/2 tsp bakig powder and 2 tbsp water. does that work in bread ovens?
 

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I once heard (from the cashier at a HFS no less) that ener-g doesn't work all the time, and that you could use it for the same recipe and it will work half of the time. have any of you found that to be true? If so, what could I use instead? I am itching to make a vegan cake, but I want to make sure first before I buy it.
 

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I think it takes practice with egg replacers to make up your mind as to which to use where.

If a recipe calls for a lot of eggs, sometimes EnerG isn't enough. I like to combine. For example using 1/4 C of silken tofu for one egg, I'll use half tofu and half EnerG. It works well in cakes that I'm trying to veganize. But, then again, it depends! Other times, EnerG is okay byitself.

I also like Flax seeds as an egg sub in some cakes, in sweet bread loaves, cookies, and other baked goods.

Use 1 TB of ground flax seeds blended with 3 TB liquid (you can use water, juice, broth, or whatever suits the recipe) for 30 seconds. This is equivalent to 1 egg. Obviously, this won't contribute lightness or height to a cake, but it adds moisture, the best binding, and lots of nutrition. It wouldn't work for something like a veganized angel food cake or a lemon pie filling, for example. It gets an "eggy" consistency just like eggs. If I use it to sub in a non-vegan recipe, I usually add a bit more rising agent, like baking powder or soda. Same for the silken tofu. EnerG adds lightness and lends height.

It just takes practice to see how they all work in a particular recipe.

For a soup calling for egg, depending on the recipe, I might leave it out. But silken tofu might work well, maybe the regular; I'm not sure if soft would be too soft, I've never simmered soft silken before. That sounds good, actually!

I use tofu as an egg sub in Pad Thai, and it works wonderfully.
 

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For cakes or other sweet recipes, I use either 3 T of unsweetened applesauce or 1/2 of a mashed banana for each egg. (The banana will chance the flavor slightly). This has worked for me every time.



Sally
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
For yeast breads, I use a heaped tablespoon of potato flour (not potato starch) and a blob of soya lecithin plus a little extra liquid for each egg in the recipe. In yeast breads, the egg is acting to make the bread tender and moist, not as a binder like in non-yeast baking. Ener-G works well as a binder for cakes and things.

In soups, I add a little whizzed tofu, and in casseroles and things I use gram flour as a binder because I don't want the Ener-G chemically taste of baking powder.
 
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