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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title says. Merely from a health standpoint instead of another, which would you say is more healthy? I read often about how chances of certain diseases are significantly lowered, but where does flexitarianism stand on this scale?
 

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depends on who you ask.
 

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I don't think flexitarianism is good for your health, it can create acute neologism-generation in the worst cases.
 

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Ankle Biter
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Since this is a vegetarian forum, you won't find many people here advocating a flexitarian diet. And it's really not allowed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Most of the serious, nonbiased, long term studies that have been done so far suggest that vegetarians have the highest lifespans between vegans, omnivores and vegetarians, although these studies don't account for the fact that some of the vegans being followed may not have properly supplemented or balanced their diets, etc.<br><br>
Naturally, health concerns are not always the primary or even one of the reasons many people go vegan. I'm a vegan myself and I did it almost entirely for ethical reasons, and wouldn't start eating milk or eggs just because I thought I'd live a little longer. Like I said, the studies that have been done so far don't take many variables into account and are pretty cut and dry.
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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On a flex diet you still get cholesterol, animal fats, animal proteins (which can be bad in their own right) mercury, an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and cancers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Poppy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2865789"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Since this is a vegetarian forum, you won't find many people here advocating a flexitarian diet. And it's really not allowed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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Advocating or not, facts are facts and I'm just looking for some, since I'm arguing with someone about it vs vegetarianism (for which I have recently decided to go).<br><br>
Thanks for the other responses with their input concerning health.
 

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One particular study that followed Seventh Day Adventists seemed to heavily indicate an increased longevity for some members of that community, although not all of them are necessarily vegetarians and some people who indicate "vegetarian" on polls sometimes consume fish for some confused reason. There's a lot of evidence that Omega 3 oils are essential for maintaining optimum health and reaching maximum natural lifespan in most humans, even though Omega 3 oils can certainly be gained from other sources than fish.<br><br>
This probably accounts for some of what makes the Mediterranean and Okinawan diets as prolific and well promoted as they are by some health professionals. They contain less saturated fat than the standard western diet and have more of the good oils including Omega 3. It would be interesting to observe the effects of vegetarian and vegan variations of those specific diets in the long term - that is, absorbing the exact same nutrients but with no fish and in the vegan study no animal products (same nutrients from plant foods or supplements) and see if similar results are to be seen.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Josh James xVx</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2865791"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Most of the serious, nonbiased, long term studies that have been done so far suggest that vegetarians have the highest lifespans between vegans, omnivores and vegetarians, although these studies don't account for the fact that some of the vegans being followed may not have properly supplemented or balanced their diets, etc.<br><br>
Naturally, health concerns are not always the primary or even one of the reasons many people go vegan. I'm a vegan myself and I did it almost entirely for ethical reasons, and wouldn't start eating milk or eggs just because I thought I'd live a little longer. Like I said, the studies that have been done so far don't take many variables into account and are pretty cut and dry.</div>
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This.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Josh James xVx</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2865791"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Most of the serious, nonbiased, long term studies that have been done so far suggest that vegetarians have the highest lifespans between vegans, omnivores and vegetarians, although these studies don't account for the fact that some of the vegans being followed may not have properly supplemented or balanced their diets, etc.</div>
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I don't think this is right. I think most of the scientific studies have shown that veganism is the healthiest, followed by vegetarianism, followed by an omni diet. Presumably pescetarianism would fit between vegetarianism and a diet that includes meat. There are some studies like you mention - ones that didn't ensure proper, balanced vegan diets and therefore showed the advantage to lie with vegetarian diets - but I don't think these are the majority any longer. For instance, the studies that the ADA and Dietitians of Canada cite in their position papers all show the most advantages to lie with veganism. They either ensured subjects were following a balanced diet, or it didn't make any difference - the benefits were still there.<br><br>
One point that always bears stressing is to ensure getting enough vitamin B12. At least one study found that vegans with insufficient B12 intake suffered from higher homocysteine levels than vegetarians. I can't remember how they compared to omnis. High homocysteine levels elevate the risk of heart disease, therefore negating some of the benefits we otherwise get from our vegan diets. A lot of vegans don't pay attention to their B12 levels, and they should.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Josh James xVx</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2865791"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Naturally, health concerns are not always the primary or even one of the reasons many people go vegan. I'm a vegan myself and I did it almost entirely for ethical reasons, and wouldn't start eating milk or eggs just because I thought I'd live a little longer.</div>
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That said (see above post), I agree with this. It's great that the diet we follow happens to be the healthiest, but it's not why we're doing it. I wouldn't care if being vegan was the least healthiest of the options, I'd still be doing it.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kimberlily1983</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2866134"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't think this is right. I think most of the scientific studies have shown that veganism is the healthiest, followed by vegetarianism, followed by an omni diet. Presumably pescetarianism would fit between vegetarianism and a diet that includes meat. There are some studies like you mention - ones that didn't ensure proper, balanced vegan diets and therefore showed the advantage to lie with vegetarian diets - but I don't think these are the majority any longer. For instance, the studies that the ADA and Dietitians of Canada cite in their position papers all show the most advantages to lie with veganism. They either ensured subjects were following a balanced diet, or it didn't make any difference - the benefits were still there.<br><br>
One point that always bears stressing is to ensure getting enough vitamin B12. At least one study found that vegans with insufficient B12 intake suffered from higher homocysteine levels than vegetarians. I can't remember how they compared to omnis. High homocysteine levels elevate the risk of heart disease, therefore negating some of the benefits we otherwise get from our vegan diets. A lot of vegans don't pay attention to their B12 levels, and they should.</div>
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Dr. Michael Greger, M.D. who is a highly qualified health care professional and a director of the Humane Society of the U.S. puts out a video lecture about once a year about the latest nonbiased scientific studies into diet based health and nutrition. Even though he's a vegan and strongly promotes a vegan diet for both health and ethical reasons, he presents the honest facts on his DVD series, and year after year the studies done so far have shown vegetarians have the highest life span.<br><br>
Like I said, many of the participants in these studies may have been confused about the actual definitions of vegan/vegetarian or many of the vegans may have come from the "old school" and grown up with a lot of terrible health advice such as the lie that B12 can be gained from seaweed (thoroughly debunked by research). I'm sure that the newest batch of vegans (excluding raw food extremists and other sub categories of vegans) are following more balanced and up to date health advice so it remains to be seen how they'll test out. After all, there's not that many vegans in the total population so there's not that many of us dying.
 

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I can't tell you much about the research, but I can share my personal experience with you. I was "flexi" for many many years prior to going vegetarian. When I cut out the meat, most dairy, and really decreased my egg intake (I really only eat them as ingredients), I was able to quit taking blood pressure and cholestoral meds. That was all the proof I needed that I was doing the right thing for my health. I blood sugars have continued to be stable in spite of the increase in total carbohydrates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Josh James, that DVD series you mentioned sounds pretty interesting. Will need to look into it.<br><br>
And thanks for the personal experience mrsschu. Funny thing is, when I tried citing sources that said vegetarianism was healthier, they tore it down saying it was biased, that it was cherry picking, etc. Though I don't remember them giving any sources that said otherwise. >_>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Josh James xVx</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2865849"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
One particular study that followed Seventh Day Adventists seemed to heavily indicate an increased longevity for some members of that community, although not all of them are necessarily vegetarians and some people who indicate "vegetarian" on polls sometimes consume fish for some confused reason. There's a lot of evidence that Omega 3 oils are essential for maintaining optimum health and reaching maximum natural lifespan in most humans, even though Omega 3 oils can certainly be gained from other sources than fish.<br><br>
This probably accounts for some of what makes the Mediterranean and Okinawan diets as prolific and well promoted as they are by some health professionals. They contain less saturated fat than the standard western diet and have more of the good oils including Omega 3. It would be interesting to observe the effects of vegetarian and vegan variations of those specific diets in the long term - that is, absorbing the exact same nutrients but with no fish and in the vegan study no animal products (same nutrients from plant foods or supplements) and see if similar results are to be seen.</div>
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Seventh Day Adventist Movement believes in Moderation and not eating the foods the Bible calls unclean, basically the scavenging animals. God does not want us eating scavengers.<br><br>
We also believe the original food for man was fruit, as was with Adam and Eve in the garden, they ate the product of the blossom, then veggies/herbs were part of the curse, then because the hardness of our Arteries a provision was made to eat meat.
 

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<i>Quote Originally Posted by Josh James xVx View Post<br>
One particular study that followed Seventh Day Adventists seemed to heavily indicate an increased longevity for some members of that community, although not all of them are necessarily vegetarians and some people who indicate "vegetarian" on polls sometimes consume fish for some confused reason.</i><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>OilPatch197</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2867522"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Seventh Day Adventist Movement believes in Moderation and not eating the foods the Bible calls unclean, basically the scavenging animals. God does not want us eating scavengers.<br><br>
We also believe the original food for man was fruit, as was with Adam and Eve in the garden, they ate the product of the blossom, then veggies/herbs were part of the curse, then because the hardness of our Arteries a provision was made to eat meat.</div>
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What, you mean you're not "confused"?
 
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