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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,<br><br><br><br>
So I am having a baby soon (Sept) and have been doing my research regarding diapering my new baby.<br><br><br><br>
I am finding ALOT of conflicting theories on each.I am hoping someone can help with my research and help me to make an informed decsion.<br><br><br><br>
My problem is , is that alot of sites are saying the energy it takes to make the cotton diapers, deliver them, wash them with soaps and hot water over and over make the same impact that a disposable diaper does.With the energy still polluting.<br><br><br><br>
Here are my options:<br><br>
~Biodegradeable Seventh Generation Diapers (very expensive!)<br><br>
~Washing cotton diapers at home with eco-soap (time consuming/yukky!)<br><br>
~Diaper cotton delivery once weekly (handy, but still wasteful of energy ?)<br><br>
~ disposable diapers(wasteful)<br><br><br><br>
My Mother did it right.She washed all her cotton diapers at home.This to me is such a yukky time consuming prospect.So I am thinking that I will do the cotton diaper delivery every week.<br><br><br><br>
Can anyone help me find the facts, so that I can feel that this really is the best decision?<br><br><br><br>
Thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rockon.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rockon:">
 

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If you are breastfeeding, the diapers will be significantly less repulsive. Washing your own cloth diapers is the most environmentally sound thing to do, short of not diapering at all (ask Zoebird about this option). You aren't contributing to landfills if you wash cotton diapers at home. Cloth diapers are also better for the baby in many cases.<br><br><br><br>
You will have to decide what *you* are comfortable with. Me? I'd use cotton cloth diapers (washing them myself) and have a few organic, biodegradable disposables as back up or for traveling.
 

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Congrats on the baby!<br><br>
Well, I'm not much help, but my mom said it was a pain to fasten the cloth diapers with a safety pin, and gross to wash.<br><br>
I babysit for a baby, and the disposable diapers in the trash really smell disgusting. I think disposable diapers are wasteful, and maybe if you wash the cotton diapers every time a new one is dirtied, it won't take as much time.<br><br>
I've seen seventh generation diapers, and they don't have chlorine (or some other chemical) like normal diapers do.<br><br>
What is the diaper cotton delivery once a week? I've never heard of it before.<br><br>
Wow, my answer is pretty long for someone who has never had a baby. Sorry!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The Diaper delivery is basically, cotton diapers delivered fresh to your door weekly.They wash them at thier plant for you.You trade your dirty diapers for clean each week.<br><br><br><br>
But, you have to remember the trucks to deliver them, the plant that washes them and the energy it took to make them.<br><br><br><br>
But, I think this may be the best option.Washing dirty diapers on top of taking care of a newborn..would not be fun in the least!<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for the congrats!
 
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i'm not a parent yet but i've been looking into it out of curiousity recently, and two things come to mind....<br><br><br><br>
- if you have a diaper pail (wet or dry) and a washing machine and drier (or access to them), then you can just throw a load (pail-full) of dirty diapers in the machine a few times a week, which seems pretty hassle free in itself (no more gross than dealing with used cat litter, in my head, and i have to do that a lot, lol).<br><br><br><br>
- also you could look into natural infant hygiene and diaper free babies (i saw a post on it around here somewhere recently) as something to consider either part or full time if you'll be home, to reduce both financial cost and diaper useage- but if you find the non disposable diper thing yucky you might feel the same about pottys and baby pee and poop in a bowl, lol.<br><br><br><br>
anyway, good luck with it!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Um, no I dont find pee-pee and poo-poo's gross.But you cannot just throw dirty diapers in a washing machine.<br><br>
You first have to dispose of the fecal matter.Which means, you carry your diaper to the toilet and rinse the diaper in the toilet.<br><br>
This can be a very messy ordeal.A baby can use upwards of 8-10 diapers daily, and if you breatsfeed, alot of them will be very messy poops..for you in rinse in a toilet.<br><br>
The diapers then have to be washed with HOT water and often times twice, to be sure they are clean and sanitized.
 

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I think changing the baby in the first place will be yukky. If you are doing it for the love of your child, and the good of the earth, I think that washing cloth diapers yourself at home would be the least wasteful-- I think you will be able to put up with a little Yukky considering babies are little "bodily fluids" factorys. Something is always coming out of a baby-- you will simply need to learn not to register it. And as far as the energy used to wash clothes and so on-- what about your own clothes? You need to use a bit of energy to keep clean. I doubt you are slamming your jeans against a rock in a river at this point.<br><br><br><br>
By the way-- look up Infant potty training (IPT)-- Disposable diaper companies make a lot of money and land-fill waste on diapers worn by toddlers-- when in fact an average baby can learn to go to the bathroom on a "toilet" before the age of one. They have the brains, just not the motor skills, and with a little persistance a baby can be trained to use a potty chair at a very young age. Children these days are potty trained very late in the game-- and it is totally unnessessary-- With early potty training there is less waste, less energy consumed, and it is less traumatic for the child.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.timl.com/ipt/" target="_blank">http://www.timl.com/ipt/</a><br><br><a href="http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002549376_potty09.html" target="_blank">http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...6_potty09.html</a>
 

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Congrats Bumble! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":up:"><br><br><br><br>
I personally would go for the diaper service if you can afford it as an option. It's better than disposables, but less time consuming (and icky) for you than washing your own. You do have to balance the environment with your own sanity too! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
Toilet training as early as possible sounds good too.
 

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i would do cotton diapers and wash them myself. my mom did that for me and she didn't seem to mind. short of that, i would do the diaper service. i just cannot image throwing out disposable diapers.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>bumble</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
The Diaper delivery is basically, cotton diapers delivered fresh to your door weekly.They wash them at thier plant for you.You trade your dirty diapers for clean each week.<br><br><br><br>
But, you have to remember the trucks to deliver them, the plant that washes them and the energy it took to make them.<br><br><br><br>
But, I think this may be the best option.Washing dirty diapers on top of taking care of a newborn..would not be fun in the least!<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for the congrats!</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Wow, thats convenient!<br><br>
Their trucks will be going to other peoples' houses too, so stopping by your house won't be a big trip.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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I had my children in a time where the disposables were rampant, when I told people I used clolth diapers, they thought I was a lunatic, but I used them all the same. The only time I did not use them is when I traveled on a plane. There was no place to rinse, let alone wash cloth diapers.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck in your decision making.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks everyone.I will probably use the cloth diaper service.One more person using cloth, is a good thing.<br><br>
I will also look into potty-training early..as I agree, potty training happens way to late!<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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This is OT, but babies who are diapered with cloth are more prone to get diaper rashes, so since you have decided to go with this option, be sure to use plenty of petroleum jelly, baby powder (which is just corn starch with added fragrance) or anti-diaper rash creams for every diapering--particularly for overnight. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
If you do use cloth diapers, you may still find yourself needing to buy disposable diapers as many daycare programs will not deal with cloth diapers. Disposables are also useful for traveling because in most situations you won't be able to flush out the soiled diaper or have anywhere to keep the soiled diaper.<br><br><br><br>
BTW, congratulations! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/baby.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":baby:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>bumble</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Um, no I dont find pee-pee and poo-poo's gross.But you cannot just throw dirty diapers in a washing machine.<br><br>
You first have to dispose of the fecal matter.Which means, you carry your diaper to the toilet and rinse the diaper in the toilet.<br><br>
This can be a very messy ordeal.A baby can use upwards of 8-10 diapers daily, and if you breatsfeed, alot of them will be very messy poops..for you in rinse in a toilet.<br><br>
The diapers then have to be washed with HOT water and often times twice, to be sure they are clean and sanitized.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Ok, I cloth diapered my twins for years. I cloth diapered my youngest until they raised the prices at my old apartment complex so much for laundry that it made more economical sense for me to buy disposables (and money was super tight). A few misconceptions here. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
1. It's not time consuming, messy or stinky to use cloth. I never rinsed the diapers. I shook off what would come off in the toilet and dropped the diapers in a small bucket that had some water and detergent (some people use vinegar or baking soda in it) to soak. I dropped urine diapers in a different pail. Both had lids so they didn't stink. We lived in an absurdly small apartment and people would sit right next to them and not know what they were. I washed diapers every 2 days for the twins, every 3-4 days for my youngest. Technically you're supposed to be dropping fecal matter from *any* diaper in the toilet before disposing of it and using a service will not mean you're able to skip that part. In fact they may still require you rinse dirty diapers.<br><br>
2. You don't need pins. Lots of stay at home moms actually manufacture velcro closing cloth diapers. They also have cloth diapers with liners or outer shells made of water resistant material so you don't need any diaper covers. The names of the cloth we used eludes me right now but fuzzibunz is an excellent overnight diaper. You stuff them with cloth diapers you find in stores and they keep the baby and his/her clothing and bedding dry all night.<br><br>
3. I never washed the diapers twice. I washed in hot water and rinsed in cold. They never stunk and I highly doubt they were crawling with germs.<br><br><br><br>
The downside? They can be bulky (makes it hard to fit the baby in pants sometimes) and they do eventually stain.<br><br>
They're not as much work as you're fearing they would be.<br><br>
Mary<br><br>
ETA: none of my kids had rashes until we switched to disposables either. If a child gets more rashes in cloth its simply because the parent isn't changing the diapers enough.<br><br>
Or the baby is having a reaction to their detergent.<br><br>
Even in disposables a baby should be changed AS SOON AS they go to the bathroom.
 

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oh boy...<br><br>
I'm teaching my future kids to use the toilet at 2 weeks for sure. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/undecided.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":-/">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>troub</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
oh boy...<br><br>
I'm teaching my future kids to use the toilet at 2 weeks for sure. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/undecided.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":-/"></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Good luck with that. Took me over two years to potty train my twins. I was darn diligent too. I thought for sure they'd be wearing diapers until they were 18. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/bigcry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":cry:"><br><br>
Mary
 

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Oh, this is OT aswell, but on the topic of babies and diaper rash, look at this!<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.burtsbees.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10101&catalogId=10751&categoryId=11716&top=Y" target="_blank">http://www.burtsbees.com/webapp/wcs/...Id=11716&top=Y</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>tearhsong2</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
This is OT, but babies who are diapered with cloth are more prone to get diaper rashes, so since you have decided to go with this option, be sure to use plenty of petroleum jelly, baby powder (which is just corn starch with added fragrance) or anti-diaper rash creams for every diapering--particularly for overnight. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Mary has already addressed this but I just wanted to say. PLEASE, Bumble, under no circumstances put PETROLEUM JELLY on your child!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shocked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"><br><br><br><br>
As far as powder goes, you can easily make a natural one without irritating parabens and artificial colors and scents.<br><br><br><br>
Best of luck!
 

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I used disposable diapers for my second baby but cloth for my first (I didn't have a washing machine when I had my second.) The cloth actually was easier to deal with than you'd think. I used a disposable liner inside the cloth so cleanup was pretty easy and it was a lot less waste than disposable diapers. I just gave the diapers a quick rinse in the toilet and washed them in the machine in hot water.<br><br><br><br>
and I second the not using petroleum jelly thing. Also, with both of my babies, they told me in the hospital to not use baby oil or baby lotion and look for baby powder made with cornstarch and not talc.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
hmm.I thought you got rashes more with disposables..<br><br><br><br>
why no petrolum jelly? (was not going to use it anyway)
 
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