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<a href="http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2011/06/27/finches-tweet-with-grammar-and-scold-those-that-dont/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+80beats+%2880beats%29" target="_blank">http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80...+%2880beats%29</a><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><b>Whats the News:</b> The more we study other species, the more we learn just how well we fit into the animal kingdom. Recently, scientists described how some <a href="http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2011/06/27/2011/06/22/polly-math-parrots-add-sophisticated-reasoning-to-their-list-of-clever-feats/" target="_blank">parrots share our ability to use logical reasoning</a>, and now a new study is showing that our syntactical language may not be all that unique either. <a href="http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nn.2869.html" target="_blank">The research</a>, published recently in the journal <i>Nature Neuroscience</i>, explains that the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society%20finch" target="_blank">society finches</a> (<i>Lonchura striata domestica)</i> sing according to an acquired set of grammatical rules. Scientists previously thought that language syntax only existed in humans and some whales.</div>
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This is cool! I've always suspected that bird languages, and animal languages in general, are far more complex than we give them credit for.<br><br>
There are some crows that live in a tree outside my window and they make the most bizarre assortment of noises in a way that does sound a lot like talking, I always wonder what they are fighting about because they usually sound angry <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Werewolf Girl</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2931631"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
This is cool! I've always suspected that bird languages, and animal languages in general, are far more complex than we give them credit for.</div>
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Yeah, I read one article a while back about a particular species of whale that has different vocalizations in different parts of the world. So the whales of that species from the Atlantic Ocean wouldn't be able to talk to the ones from the Pacific Ocean, because they speak different languages, despite being the same species.<br><br>
It doesn't surprise me that birds also have complex languages, given how vocal most species of birds can be. Everyone knows about African Grey parrots being able to talk, but even those birds that can't learn human languages can be very expressive with their chirps and whistles.<br><br>
--Fromper<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/juggle.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":juggle:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Fromper</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2931799"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yeah, I read one article a while back about a particular species of whale that has different vocalizations in different parts of the world. So the whales of that species from the Atlantic Ocean wouldn't be able to talk to the ones from the Pacific Ocean, because they speak different languages, despite being the same species.</div>
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IIRC, there was a LSE podcast on animal minds few months back where one of the professors on comparative cognition said that it's same with birds. Except instead of different languages, they do have different regional accents.<br><br><br>
I guess grammar nazis aren't just inflicted on humanity.
 

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"Chirp chirp! Good Morning!"<br>
"Chirp chirp! Good Morning!"<br>
"Chirp chirp chirp! Morning good!"<br>
...<br>
"CHIRP!"<br>
"CHIRP!"<br>
"CHIRP!"<br>
"CHIRP!"<br>
"Okay okay, sorry!"
 

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That's so cool! Especially the thing about the languages and accents. Do birds and whales also use physical communication? Like I noticed with dogs and cats, they don't bark or meow very much, they communicate with their tails, hackles, ears, nose, etc., but since birds chirp a lot more than a dog or cat barks, and whales are sometimes pretty vocal, too, do they use vocalizations as their main form of communication the way humans do?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>disney.jessica</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2932382"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
That's so cool! Especially the thing about the languages and accents. Do birds and whales also use physical communication? Like I noticed with dogs and cats, they don't bark or meow very much, they communicate with their tails, hackles, ears, nose, etc., but since birds chirp a lot more than a dog or cat barks, and whales are sometimes pretty vocal, too, do they use vocalizations as their main form of communication the way humans do?</div>
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Birds peck at each other all the time, and I'm not just talking fighting. That's definitely a major form of communication between them.<br><br>
--Fromper<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/juggle.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":juggle:">
 

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So apparently other animals are heading in the exact opposite direction from humans when it comes to speaking well?
 
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