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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been a vegetarian for years now, and I thought I had tofu figured out--there was silken tofu and firm/extra firm tofu.

Then I realized I had been using silken firm tofu, and everything went awry.

Is there anyone who can explain to me the difference between silken firm tofu and regular firm tofu? Also, I've read that regular tofu is much easier to find in grocery stores than silken tofu, but in various grocery stores I've only been able to find silken and silken firm, both packaged in water and in aseptic packaging. Essentially, I've never seen firm tofu that wasn't also "silken." What am I doing wrong?

I've been trying to find information online, to no avail. I read the official tofu thread in this forum, and it didn't really help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's actually the only semi-helpful article I was able to find, but it didn't really help with my dilemma. It did establish that they were two different things. So basically, silken tofu and extra firm silken tofu are practically both the same in that they aren't meant for staying solid? Seems silly that they'd bother varying the texture in that case. Well, what popular brands make regular firm tofu? The brands I've seen in stores are Mori-Nu, Nasoya, and occassionally Azumaya. Mori-Nu and Nasoya are always silken, and I'm not sure about Azumaya but I think it is the same way. What brands make the regular kind?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The tofu in the stores I have looked at is found in two locations: the refrigerated section of the nutrition section, and the shelves of the nutrition section. The refrigerated section has Nasoya silken, silken firm, and silken extra firm, while the shelf has Mori-Nu silken and silken firm. I may just be in an unfortunate situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I noticed that also, but Nasoya was the brand I was using when I first realized that the packages said "silken extra firm," and the packing for their regular tofu does not resemble the packaging of the ones at my local kroger. It's really strange, but as you suggested I'll probably have to go to the closest whole foods to purchase it instead. I had wondered why my tofu always seemed to fall apart while I was pressing it for dishes.
 

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Where are you? I've had more of a problem finding firm silken. The regular tofu seems much more common in Ohio.
I only use silken for smoothies and some desserts, and only buy it with a recipe in mind.
Regular extra firm tofu I use for general cooking. Wouldn't call it spongy exactly (unless you freeze it-I don't like that) but it does have texture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm in Atlanta. From what I've read, that seems to be the case most places (difficulty finding silken) but, I can only seem to find tofu that isn't labeled "silken" at (ironically) Wal-Mart.
 

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If you can find it, I HIGHLY recommend Mandarin Soyfoods pressed tofu. It comes in a package with 4 very firm, pressed tofu cubes inside. It is the best non-silken tofu I've ever tried...to the point that I have an entire (though small) rack in my fridge for it.


And here is the website:
http://www.sunrise-soya.com/
 

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Tofu brings a lot of high-quality protein that will help your body's immune system, improvement and repairing of muscles and tissues, etc. It also helps you to lower cholesterol to prevent blood clots, high blood pressure, and sugar level.
 
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