VeggieBoards banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was diagnosed on Thursday. I'd suspected that there was a problem for months and had even posted a thread on excessive thirst here, a while back. I started showing some other symptoms and finally decided to go to the doctor for some blood work. After having not eaten anything all day long, my blood sugar was at 303 (a normal, healthy person's blood sugar is supposed to be somewhere between 70-110).

Anyway, my doctors have me testing my blood sugar before meals and before bedtime every day, for the time being. They have me on 12 units of Lantus (a basal insulin) administered in the morning before breakfast.

My problem lies in the fact that after meals, my BS is rising to more than 600. I called my doctor about it and was told to lay off of the carbs and to "eat meat or cheese or something".


I'm officially to the point in which I'm petrified to eat. Everything that I eat is laden with carbs- everything. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, etc- all have carbs. Yesterday I tried filling up on raw foods from a raw foods restaurant (because that seemed like the best option- fresh, low in sugar and carbs, etc). Although everything was delicious, I was left hungry in an hour, $20 poorer, and ended up gorging on a big bowl of my favorite cold cereal with milk before dinnertime which sent my BS to above 600, again.

Also, I'm not a fan of tofu. After four years of trying it every possible way- I've come to accept the fact that it's simply not my thing. Tempeh, on the other hand, rocks my world.

This is all so overwhelming!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,906 Posts
well, iwould say lay off the cereal for sure.

from what i know, being a vegan with type 1 diabetes is hard. you need to eat minimal carbs and even vegan "protein' sources (like beans, soy and whole grains) are very high in carbs. that being said, eating these things without an accompanying grain (like rice or potatoes) would be a start to upping your protein ratio and lowering the carbs. and then, also eating bunches of veggies with meals.

the only things i can think of are things like seitan, or seitan based (fake meats like yves deli slices, morningstar hotdogs, etc). which is also not so healthy all the time.

what have you been eating? it might help to get a sample day to see how to alter things.

do you currently eat cheese/eggs or are you vegan?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,850 Posts
What about peanut butter (most natural ones don't have sugar) and nuts?

Beans contain carbs but lots of fiber too, which slows down digestion. Definitely better than the cereal.

Maybe ask your doctor for referral to a veg-friendly dietician.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I've had type 1 diabetes for over twenty years. It's possible to be a vegetarian and still manage your blood sugar levels.

First of all, I recommend finding another doctor, an endocrinologist if possible. Many family doctors/general practitioners are not up-to-date with the latest treatments and will not treat your diabetes agressively enough.

Insulin treatment these days tries to mimic what your pancreas would do. That means taking a basal insulin to keep your blood sugar steady, and then taking a short acting insulin whenever you eat. Long acting insulins like your lantus supply a steady stream of insulin. Short and rapid acting insulins like humalog inject a quick spurt of insluin into your bloodstream that starts acting very quickly (5 to 30 minutes depending on the kind) and tapers off after a few hours. This short acting insulin covers any carbs you eat. With the right insulin regimen, you should be able to eat much like you ate before you were diagnosed.

You said that you don't like tofu. Have you tried edamame? Or unsweetened soymilk? Unsweetened soymilk only has about 3g of carbohydrate. That's about the same as most non-starchy vegetables. Nuts are also pretty low in carbs. And eggs too if you eat them. Either way, it would probably be helpful to speak with a dietician. That can help you figure out how you should expect different foods to affect your blood sugar levels. Your doctor should be able to refer you to one that specializes in diabetes.

Please don't let this overwhelm you. Eventually, all of this will become second nature to you, and you won't even think about it most of the time. Once you're on the right treatment plan, you're going to feel so much better and so much more in control.

A good place to read more about all of this is the American Diabetes Association web site. There's a lot of good information. Just stay away from the boards there, they're intense. And of course, I'll be happy to answer any questions you have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,219 Posts
Stellar,

Molly jdade is right, you need to see an endocrinologist and a dietician.

Im an NP , i worked for years in and endocrinology practice, you need to be treated differently with all factors in consideration.

you may need a different med combo............the ada does have good info as well.

good luck, and don't put this off........keeping your blood sugar levels in check is very very important, it is what will prevent organ damage........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Stellar, some endocrinologists and some internists may have as a second speciality: diabetes. At least it is the case in Germany and I guess it's the same in Minniapolis. Letting you on Lantus in the morning and propose a diet of fat and proteins doesn't seem to follow scientific knowledge. Most probably you need a short acting insulin 3-4 times a day and Lantus in the evening. Try to eat whole grain foods and eat more veggies than fruits as fruits contain lots of fructose and even glucose and therefore quickly elevate your blood sugar level. Try to see a specialist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I suppose I should have gone into greater detail about some things


I've been minimally lacto-ovo for four years. I eat diary and eggs, but keep them at a bare minimum.

After being diagnosed on Thursday, I was immediately referred to an endocrinologist and a diabetic educator. I met with the endocrinologist first and the educator for a few hours after. I was given basic information about diabetes and shown how to inject my insulin and check my BS. My educator also told me that I will have a nutritionist on my 'team' but I wasn't able to meet with her on that day. I'll be meeting with her today, actually.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Great news. Then they'll start your therapy after establishing a coma prophylaxis with Lantus.

Good luck! And give us a hint, how your meeting went.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Hi Stellar~~ I hope everything is going well with your insulin regimen and your diet. I wanted to post a link to the Glycemic Index - this can be a very helpful resource when you're trying to figure out what kinds of carbs you can eat as a vegetaian with diabetes. Counting your carbs is important, but so is the type of carbs you are getting - as Lothar alluded. This index will help you to pick the kinds of food that, although they may seem to be high in carbs, have a low GI and therefore will actually have a minimal impact on your post-meal glucose levels.

http://www.glycemicindex.com/

Another thing I would recommend is to take a 15-20 minute walk after each meal. Exercise is the best way to help your muscles absorb and burn that excess glucose - just be sure to discuss this with your endocrinologist so he can adjust your insulin regimen if needed (especially if he puts you on "mealtime" insulin).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Hi Stellar,

I hope you are doing better, I know those really high blood sugars can make you feel terrible. I've been type I diabetic for the last 24 years and vegan for almost 4. You should be able to eat most of the same things you have in the past, its just a matter of learning how to adjust your insulin dose as well as getting the timing right in order to keep your sugars in the normal range. You'll get the hang of it. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions or just need some support.

PS - my primary care doctor, my endo, and my dietician are all supportive of a vegan diet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I know this is just my own personal pet peeve, but type 1 and type 2 diabetes are very different things. Diabetes describes the symptom (high blood sugar levels), not the cause. It's like saying everyone with a fever has "febrosis". The treatments for type 1 and type 2 diabetes are different. There have been absolutely no studies of a vegan diet in patients with type 1 diabetes. Learning how to eat a vegan diet with type 1 isn't something I would recommend to someone newly diagnosed.

I know I'm coming off as really cranky here, but I can remember when I was transitioning to a vegan diet. It was so frustrating that people kept bringing up this study.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top