VeggieBoards banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
seeker and optimist
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To start with he wondered why I didn't bring eggs back from my midwife when I went to my appointment last week. I thought that was bizarre, we've been vegan since 1 November of last year. When he asked me if I would eat eggs now that I'm pregnant I said "no, not unless [midwife] said that I was seriouly lacking something in my current diet".<br><br><br><br>
Now he wants to help my neighbors with their fence so that they can get hens and share their eggs. He also said that he thought it was important that our daughter eat eggs! These hens would virtually be in our backyard and doing their hen thing unharmed...<br><br><br><br>
Even in my many many years as an 'almost-vegetarian' I'd avoid eggs... I was deeply impacted after watching a chick emerge from an egg w/in an incubator at Chicago's museum of science and industry years back.<br><br><br><br>
It was so nice having the support of the whole family... I'm truly afraid that this will begin a downward spiral of "well, since I eat eggs now I can buy this homemade cookie" etc.<br><br><br><br>
Hosestly down the road I can see this... I just thought we'd be vegan for *shrug* a year or so before making any drastic changes. I can perhaps see us having our own hens (not in the condominium home we currently own though) in the future and using their eggs. Although I don't see too much else changing regarding our diet. I'm not sure what you'd call that kind of vegetarian, if it even matters.<br><br><br><br>
Nothing has happened yet, so this concern is perhaps futile... I just felt so lucky and blessed. I mean DH went from omni to vegan overnight, excluding honey and everything. It's so much easier when you're not the only one.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">One is the loneliest number<br><br>
That you'll ever do<br><br>
Two can be as bad as one<br><br>
It's the loneliest number since the number one<br><br><br><br>
No is the saddest experience<br><br>
You'll ever know<br><br>
Yes, it's the saddest experience<br><br>
You'll ever know<br><br>
Because one is the loneliest number<br><br>
That'll you'll ever do<br><br>
One is the loneliest number<br><br>
That you'll ever know</div>
</div>
<br>
-Aimee Mann
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,003 Posts
That is not good. I think it may even be harder than not having had his support in the first place. Once you've had something, it's so hard to let it go. Good luck.... maybe it's just an expression of his concern of taking proper care of two kids? (I don't know..)
 

·
seeker and optimist
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for your support nookle...<br><br><br><br>
I can see your point about wanting the best for the family, bu I thought we both agreed that right now this IS the best for us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,003 Posts
Oh I agree that it is, but you know how people freak out and question things under the slightest stress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>echowarrior</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I was deeply impacted after watching a chick emerge from an egg w/in an incubator at Chicago's museum of science and industry years back.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
If it makes you feel any better, birds lay eggs even if there are not fertilized chicks inside. So if there is no rooster, there will be no babies, only eggs. If you buy free range, especially if you raise your own, there is no reason to feel bad about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sally429</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If it makes you feel any better, birds lay eggs even if there are not fertilized chicks inside. So if there is no rooster, there will be no babies, only eggs. If you buy free range, especially if you raise your own, there is no reason to feel bad about it.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
If your raising the hens yourself or know they are in good, loving conditions and you collect the leftover eggs they lay by themselves, I could see that being cool. But just buying "free range" doesn't make them good.<br><br><br><br>
From Wikipedia: "Likewise, free-range egg producers have no common standard on what the term means. Many egg farmers sell their eggs as free range merely because their cages are 2 or 3 inches above average size, or there is a window in the shed."<br><br><br><br><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_range" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_range</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,003 Posts
DH - dear husband (I know, I don't really get it either)<br><br>
midwife - someone who is trained in pregnancy, labor and birth. An alternative to an OBGYN.<br><br><br><br>
From Merriam Webster:<br><br><br><br>
Main Entry: 1mid·wife<br><br>
Pronunciation: 'mid-"wIf<br><br>
Function: noun<br><br>
Etymology: Middle English midwif, from mid with (from Old English) + wif woman<br><br>
1 : a person who assists women in childbirth -- compare NURSE-MIDWIFE<br><br>
2 : one that helps to produce or bring forth something
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,777 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>echowarrior</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
(One is the Loneliest Number...) -Aimee Mann</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
You do realize that was Three Dog Night, right? Aimee Mann did a cover.
 

·
seeker and optimist
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>OregonAmy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You do realize that was Three Dog Night, right? Aimee Mann did a cover.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/doh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":doh:"> I do now... *blush* thanks for the correction Amy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sally429</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If it makes you feel any better, birds lay eggs even if there are not fertilized chicks inside. So if there is no rooster, there will be no babies, only eggs. If you buy free range, especially if you raise your own, there is no reason to feel bad about it.</div>
</div>
<br>
Reasons to feel bad about it:<br><br>
- For every hen, a newborn male chick is killed. Most common methods of slaughter (not necessarily in this order): gassing, suffocation, being ground up<br><br>
- Through intensive breeding, hens lay up to ten times more eggs per year than they do in the wild, which robs their bodies of so much calcium and minerals that many end up with brittle bones<br><br>
- Hens on commercial farms are typically killed once they're not laying enough eggs to be profitable, at about one to two years old. The slaughter process is horrific.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,134 Posts
These notes are all great if you're talking about commercially farmed hens, but they're irrelevant here.<br><br><br><br>
Read the thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sally429</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If you buy free range, especially if you raise your own, there is no reason to feel bad about it.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
She was told "If you buy free range" as well as raising your own was alright. This is not always the case. (I bet there are some nice farms out there... but where?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Men do have strange thoughts when there are babies in the equation. Mine (omni outside the home, lacto/ovo inside) keeps saying we should introduce fish in the diet at home, while our kid is almost 6 years old and growing normally. I think his "new" ideas stem from some form of anxiety over possible malnutrition and the responsibility of raising a kid... Men can get very anxious about this responsibility ! Get some books on raising vegan children (if you haven't already) and try to convince him it's OK to raise a child vegan, that you will get the baby checked regularly (as you would anyway, vegan or not) and that you'll know if she's not growing right.<br><br>
This being said, if he craves eggs for himself, I would vote for the homekept hens.<br><br><i>(Luckily we do not have the "free range" problem here as anything organic or free range is very strictly regulated and if it says the hens are allowed to rummage outside, then this is checked regularly by some controlling official).</i>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>vegzilla</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Reasons to feel bad about it:<br><br>
- For every hen, a newborn male chick is killed. Most common methods of slaughter (not necessarily in this order): gassing, suffocation, being ground up<br><br>
- Through intensive breeding, hens lay up to ten times more eggs per year than they do in the wild, which robs their bodies of so much calcium and minerals that many end up with brittle bones<br><br>
- Hens on commercial farms are typically killed once they're not laying enough eggs to be profitable, at about one to two years old. The slaughter process is horrific.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I mostly just meant of they plan to raise their own, I just threw free range in there because it is a better alternative to commercial farms if her husband wants to eat eggs. Obviously raising your own is best...jeeze I didn't think people would get all upset about it lol. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/veganpolice.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":notvegan:">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I'm not upset. That's something that is hard about veganisim... so many things are in grey areas, and when you try to explain or give advice things can be all messed up... I just wanted the poster to know that not all organic farms are ran equally. It's something you have to check out for yourself, I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,388 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>IamJen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
These notes are all great if you're talking about commercially farmed hens, but they're irrelevant here.<br><br><br><br>
Read the thread.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Unless the hens are rescues they come from a breeder who more than likely discards male chicks. Yes, home-grown eggs are generally more humane than commercially produced, but buying chicks from a breeder still contributes financially to a system that treats chickens as a disposable commodity. Just something to keep in mind during the "humane egg" debate.<br><br><br><br>
To the OP: have you asked your husband why he is suddenly feeling the need to incorporate eggs into his/your child's diet? If it stems from a nutritional concern, perhaps you can work out a way to address that concern while remaining vegan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Blue Plastic Straw</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Unless the hens are rescues they come from a breeder who more than likely discards male chicks. Yes, home-grown eggs are generally more humane than commercially produced, but buying chicks from a breeder still contributes financially to a system that treats chickens as a disposable commodity. Just something to keep in mind during the "humane egg" debate.<br><br><br></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Eggsactly. (sorry, couldn't resist...)<br><br><br><br>
However you obtain chicks (or adults), their male siblings were disposed of in some horrible way, at some point down the line. And these hens used for egg production have been selectively bred so far from their wild cousins, in order to produce an unnaturally high amount of eggs in a lifetime, that their bodies become depleted of much needed nutrients, like calcium.<br><br><br><br>
At most sanctuaries, rescued hens are offered their own unfertilized eggs to consume as a means to replace the lost nutrients. Humans aren't consuming the eggs even under those circumstances, even though one could argue the chickens are being treated humanely, since the eggs belong to the hens, not us.<br><br><br><br>
Unfortunately if you consume the eggs of another animal (its fetus or menses, really <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/spew.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":spew:"> ), you are contributing to exploitation or abuse somewhere in the chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
I know where you're coming from. My boyfriend is a vegan, he joined me to live in France, and now he tried some French cheese and developed a real taste for it. I'm not gonna switch back to being a veggie, but sometimes I wonder if he's really far from them. He wanted to try real "croissants" too.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top