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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey VB!<br><br><br><br>
I realize I have not posted in quite some time. Although, occasionally I do read. However, right after I write this post, I'm going to make it a point to help somebody else out.<br><br><br><br>
That being said...<br><br><br><br>
I have been dumbfounded lately. I am not prone to depression, I usually realize how precious life is, and short...too short to be spending my days feeling sorry for myself.<br><br><br><br>
I have had a very rough couple months. the guy i moved out west with, who i was planning on marrying, more or less broke up with me. (i say more or less, b/c it my decision to end it, b/c of the way he was treating me). we have a dog together...had a life. it is over now.<br><br><br><br>
So, I moved out of our place, which put me in a financially poor situation. Now, I'm in school full time, and I just lost my job due to the restaurant closing.<br><br><br><br>
I have been feeling very unmotivated lately. Which, frustrates the hell out of me, b/c i don't like being a sad sap. But, over the past couple months i've been going, going, going...trying to move on and be strong, and now it feels as though it's coming out no matter what i do. I cry at everything lately. EVERYthing...and not directly related to me or my life...completely random things.<br><br><br><br>
Also, my skin has been horrible. I have rosacea...and I don't know if it's the stress, or something I'm eating--or NOT eating.<br><br><br><br>
So, sorry VB'ers for writing this book. Just needed to vent. Any advice appreciated...although there is probably not much you can say to me...i realize, it just takes time.<br><br><br><br>
thanks!<br><br><br><br>
jill.
 

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What you're going through is called "situational depression" and it can be a very serious thing, leading to long-term clinical depression. Not saying this to scare you, just saying not to take it too lightly (ha, right) and not to "hope it goes away." Things you can do : Be very careful to eat well, good balanced diet with plenty of complex carbs, which help the body produce seratonin; try to get regular exercise such as walking 1/2 hr - 1 hr daily; get regular sleep, if you need help sleeping, try chamomile tea, it really works (lemon balm tea is good too, also passionflower, and lavender, these herbs all help with depression and anxiety). Keeping a journal can really help with getting the feelings out instead of stewing over them all the time, a creative pursuit such as poetry, painting, or drawing can help.<br><br><br><br>
These are all things which have helped me, I hope they might help you some.
 

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You're going through a really rough time right now so it's not surprising that you aren't feeling great. When you make plans for the future with someone else and it all gets taken away from you - it can be a real shock to the system.<br><br><br><br>
It sounds like you're doing really well though by staying in school and looking after yourself financially - even if it is a struggle at times. Be kind to yourself and remember you and your own life plans are important and you have a right to be here and to have a good life.<br><br><br><br>
I think Ludi gives excellent advice - it's essential to take really good care of yourself.<br><br><br><br>
There are a lot of people here to listen and help - I am often around the boards if you ever want to chat or just vent...<br><br><br><br>
vegmumma xxx
 

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*says hi*.... (I don't know why, I just am) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Advice from me would be weird as I am just off the radar of sanity kinda, sorta, but I wish you well.... Maybe I'll post a bit of something extra later when my brain is unscrambled, but at least I remember you being at VB somewhere along the time line anyway. Thats not much use to you, but if thats cold comfort that might give rise to warmth, you can in the meantime just disguise that cold comfort with wintry backdrop, hehe. But yeah just now, I am one of those with not much I can say.... but hi and hope you come out of your slump or thing and like vegmumma says, you are doing really well by staying in school yo!<br><br><br><br>
I know slumps & depression very well, but it weirds me out thinking about it, as it can be quite a complex issue... especially if with that you are lonely like I am & whatever.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
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Jam 1:2 Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of various kinds,<br></div>
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<br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
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Rom 15:13 May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit you may abound in hope.<br></div>
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<br><br><br>
..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well, thank you so much. i really appreciate all your kind words.<br><br>
ludi, I think you're right about eating well. complex carbs like wheat bread and whole grain foods? i really did not know that they help produce seratonin.<br><br><br><br>
sleeping has certainly not been a problem, it's the whole waking up part that is!<br><br><br><br>
and, yes, i have been writing and working on my art work (when i have time). and, i think it does help. but, i guess what's hardest is that, it doesn't seem to effect him like it has effected me. and i don't get it. he was the one who wanted to get married. he was the one always talking about our future. it's very frustrating. but, i suppose, it's easier for him because he has found a group of friends here, in denver, and i have not yet.<br><br><br><br>
alright, thanks again everyone.<br><br><br><br>
jill.
 

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definitional question:<br><br><br><br>
need the situation of situational depression be external to the individual?<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i'm not so sure.<br><br><br><br>
i figured ludi meant by situational depression, that my feelings were directly related to something that happened to me--effecting me internally.<br><br><br><br>
but, now i don't know if she meant internal or external. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/undecided.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":-/"><br><br><br><br>
hmph. good question.
 

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I found this online:<br><br><br><br>
Acute Situational Depression<br><br>
This is the type of depression that one feels when dealing with a loss of some type (bereavement). This can be anything from the loss of a loved one to the loss of a job to the loss of a home. When something important is no longer available, that constitutes a loss. Most physicians and mental health care workers feel that acute situational depression is not only "normal" but desireable. It seems to help the mind deal with the loss and eventually return to a normal emotional state. Historically, people who don't grieve have a more difficult time with other problems over the long term. Like all other depression, this type can be very different in degree depending on the individual and the circumstances. It can be difficult, at times, distinguishing between Acute Situational Depression and Chronic Unipolar Depression. When situational depression goes on too long it can become chronic and, sometimes, require medical treatment as well as counselling.
 

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And this:<br><br><br><br>
Situational Depression<br><br>
Q. How would you suggest people deal with situational depression? If someone is depressed because of world events, due to going through a divorce, or due to being fired, are they treated differently than someone who is depressed without any specific cause?<br><br>
A. In one sense, depression is depression is depression. That is, if a person were to develop what is termed a major depressive episode (MDE)--with full-blown symptoms of severe guilt, loss of energy, motivation, pleasure, etc., accompanied by disturbed sleep and appetite--he or she would be treated essentially the same way, whether this depression arose in the context of some specific situational stressor or came out of the blue. In fact, there is evidence showing that the course and outcome of major depression is not influenced by the presence of a known stressor or situational precipitant. If you've got the symptoms, you've got the illness--and treatment proceeds along the usual lines. That is, either psychotherapy or medication or both will be offered the patient.<br><br><br><br>
In many cases of mild-to-moderate depression, psychotherapy may suffice; in more severe MDEs, medication is often necessary. Some data suggest that the best results come from a combination of medication and psychotherapy. That said, the presence of a known situational factor in a MDE may affect the specific content of the psychotherapy. For example, let's suppose someone develops an MDE in the course of a divorce. Psychotherapy may very well examine the meaning of marriage for that individual, feeling loved versus feeling abandoned, etc., and perhaps relate these issues to the individual's past response to similar traumas. But the general approach to the patient is the same whether there is, or is not, a clear precipitant to the MDE.<br><br><br><br>
This is not to say that everybody who is feeling upset or down in response to a psychosocial stressor is clinically depressed, or in need of professional treatment. Many individuals reacting to such stressors will do fine simply by getting support from friends, family, clergy, or even on-line chat groups. Some will find solace in self-help manuals or non-professional support groups. But when the person presents with a full-blown MDE, especially when accompanied by suicidal feelings or ideas, he or she should seek out a health care professional. And this is true whether or not the person can identify a precipitant. If you'd like more information on depression, you may want to contact the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association, at 800-826-3632 (<a href="http:" target="_blank">www.ndmda.org)</a>.
 

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I'm pretty sure Ludi was speaking of external distinctions.<br><br>
I happen to be a psychology buff...of sorts...and am wondering how the psychiatric establishment would regard this.
 
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