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I usually just cut up my sweet potatoes in thick slices or wedges and bake them in the oven, but last night I wanted crunchy sweet potatoes and decided to slice them into chips and fry them. They didnt come out right at all. The flavor was good, but they didn't come out crunchy at all. They were quite soft and very greasy. Ive never really deep fried anything before, so that could be my problem.<br><br><br><br>
I dont have a deep fryer, so I just used a deep frying pan and filled it with oil about one inch thick. I tried using a thermometer to get it to the right temp. The instructions on the thermometer said to heat to 375 for potatoes (yes, I know sweet potatoes are not potatoes, but), but the thermometer fell into the oil before I could get it out. The thermometer has a plastic bulb at the top with a clip that attaches the pot, but the pan was too shallow for it to clip onto, so I just propped it up the best I could. Well, the klutz that I am, I bumped the thermometer and it fell into the oil, and the plastic bulb started to melt and oil filled the thermometer. Cheap-ass thermometer!<br><br><br><br>
So without the thermometer, I just heated the oil over almost high heat and figured it was hot enough when the potato sizzled when I placed it in the oil. I put in only enough chips to form one layer and fried them for about 3-5 minutes, but they were turning too brown and not becoming crispy, so I had to take them out before they burned. I did turn the oil down a little, but got the same results.<br><br><br><br>
I can picture you all shaking your head at me and <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> at my ignorance. I know <i>I</i> am. Yes, Im a <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/dunce.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":dunce:"> when it comes to frying, and this experience has completely turned me off from ever frying anything again.<br><br><br><br>
But, if I had fried them properly, should the sweet potatoes have not been so greasy? And wouldnt they have come out crispy? Isnt this how Terra chips are made, by frying them? My husband seems to think they are dehydrated and thats what makes them crunchy. Any thoughts are welcome. Or if you just wanna make fun of my frying skills, feel free. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/doh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":doh:">
 

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>>But, if I had fried them properly, should the sweet potatoes have not been so greasy? And wouldn’t they have come out crispy?>><br><br><br><br>
Yes. The oil was too cool.<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's what I thought, but they were burning (turning dark brown) before they had a chance to turn crispy.
 

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Cut them into long strips about a 1/4 inch thick (think steak fries) and place them in a bowl of ice water for about 15 minutes. Heat your oil to 350 or 370 and then pat dry the sweet potatoes and deep fry for about 5 minutes. If you don't have a deep-fry thermometer, just stick a bread cube in the oil - when it sizzles and turns a golden color, the oil is hot enough.
 

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Type of oil matters. You need a high temprature oil like canola. Many oils are so fragile they shouldnt even be heated. You were also "shallow frying." Also potatos with a lot of sugar in them will go brown. Places that make fries actually buy low sugar potatos (even sweet potatos) that are specifically grown (genetically modified) for "frying," so home made things like sweet potato fries will be a bit darker. It might be a good idea to stick with baking. Good luck.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>MrFalafel</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Cut them into long strips about a 1/4 inch thick (think steak fries)...</div>
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This is how I usually cut them when I bake them, but I wanted them to be crunchy like potato chips.<br><br><br><br>
As for the oil I used, it was a combination of peanut and vegetable oil that has been sitting in my cupboard for a very long time, because it's all I had, and I badly needed to satiate my sweet potato craving. Could it be that the oil was bad? Would that cause them not to fry properly?
 

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You should read up on old oils. Rancid oil gives off free radicals. Some biochemists consider rancid oil a carcenogen. (this includes the oily germ of rice, wheat, and so on) One reason it is removed is so the grain wont go rancid and will last longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Gita</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Type of oil matters. You need a high temprature oil like canola. Many oils are so fragile they shouldnt even be heated. You were also "shallow frying." Also potatos with a lot of sugar in them will go brown. Places that make fries actually buy low sugar potatos (even sweet potatos) that are specifically grown (genetically modified) for "frying," so home made things like sweet potato fries will be a bit darker. It might be a good idea to stick with baking. Good luck.</div>
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Gita, I didn't even see this post when making the comment directly below this. I understand your point about not using certain oils, but do things not deep fry properly in oil that shallow? I tried looking up a recipe online before I fried them, and I found one that said I needed at least one inch. Is that not deep enough? I guess it doesn't matter anymore, because I probably won't be deep frying anything for a long time (if ever), but I'm just curious.
 
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