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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I completely understand being a vegetarian or vegan, but I don't understand why you would go raw. Is there something I'm missing? Maybe I'm missing what it actually means. My guess is that you don't eat anything cooked...right??? Please enlighten me, I really want to know!

Again, I am NOT judging at all, just curious!
 

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I'm not raw yet but I have tried it a few times. To me it just seems like the simplest and most natural way of eating. I feel like I'll probably be 100% raw or close to that someday but for now I find it too difficult.
 

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I'm not raw -- but as I understand it, raw food contains enzymes that help your body digest it. Cooking destroys these enzymes, so your body has to use up its stores of enzymes to digest cooked food. The body only has a finite store of enzymes which are not replenished. I've heard people say that raw food diets keep you young and perhaps that is why?

Also, cooking destroys a lot of the vitamins in food, more or less depending on the type of cooking (baking, steaming, frying, grilling) and the length of time cooked.

I try to eat raw food a lot of the time, but I'm nowhere near 100%. However, I can tell you that on days I've eaten mostly raw food, I have felt fantastic. I buy raw versions of things when they are available, like raw nuts instead of roasted, raw almond butter, raw tahini. I eat a big salad at least once a day. I think it's important to eat a lot of raw food, but to me it's not imperitive to cut out ALL cooked food.
 

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The enzyme/digestion theory has been debated many times here and in other forums. Not sure if there has been any concensus but I tend to believe that the enzymes in the food don't really help break down the food. But I do wonder if there are other factors in eating raw food that make the nutrients in the food more bioavailable to the body.

But the change/destruction of vitamins and other nutrients in cooking is not so contentious. Even non-rawfoodist dieticians will tell you to eat more fresh, raw fruits and vegetables. So that's what I do for now.
 

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Oh, thanks for those links Seasiren. I especially like this:

Quote:
The obvious separation created by putting fire between our food and our mouth, the tremendous amount of time and energy people spend to cook food, the use of massive resources to create today's cooked-food culture (with its billions of kitchens and restaurants), the construction of factories and shops all churning out cooked and processed foods, the packaging and wrappers involved in the whole cooked-food process, and the lack of life energy in cooked food are all major contributing factors in humanity's fall from paradise. Subconsciously, we know this, as our picture of paradise usually involves sun, beaches, mangoes, and coconuts; not gloomy cities, restaurants, and cooked animals for dinner.
http://www.sunfood.com/cgi-bin/order...762&sp=why_raw
 

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You can live on a raw diet, but I'd recommend doing a lot of research on it, particularly in areas (ethical or health) that drive you to take that path. A lot of the health benefits that are still being kicked around are residual from the early to mid 20th century, and based on studies that, as it turns out, were never performed or at least recorded. That's not to say there's no truth to the claims, I just suggest that you have real reasons for dietary change for health reasons, rather than just falling for before and after photos or persuasive writing.

If you're considering it from an ethical standpoint, consider the source of your food. It takes a hell of a lot more energy to fly a mango from Costa Rica than it does to cook rhubarb.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Sun View Post

The enzyme/digestion theory has been debated many times here and in other forums. Not sure if there has been any concensus but I tend to believe that the enzymes in the food don't really help break down the food. But I do wonder if there are other factors in eating raw food that make the nutrients in the food more bioavailable to the body.
From what i've read about enzymes is that the enzymes the plant needs to produce beneficial nutrients is destroyed when cooking. I'm guessing that this is where the whole enzyme theory started and got tangled up with some confusion.
 

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Originally Posted by nigel View Post

If you're considering it from an ethical standpoint, consider the source of your food. It takes a hell of a lot more energy to fly a mango from Costa Rica than it does to cook rhubarb.
I think that's why many raw foodists advocate eating locally grown food.
 

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I actually like this link about raw vs. cooked. It explains what happens when food is cooked.

http://www.rawfoodlife.com/Articles_..._v__cooked.htm

One of the basic ideas is that when you cook your food you alter the structure of it so you body doesn't recognize it anymore. Not only that but since the enzymes are gone, the body has to take other enzymes to digest the cooked food which faciliates the aging process. That could explain why a heavy cooked meal seems to take so long to digest. There is more work for the body to do.

I do agree with Nigel - Raw foodist like their tropcial fruits (I love them too) and unless you live in Costa Rica - it can be rare energy expending to ship that fruit over.
 

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For example, and don't quote me on this because i may have it a bit wrong, but one of the benefical nutrients in garlic is produced when a clove is broken open. I'm not sure of the biochemical processes going on here but some type of cascade is initiated. If you cook the garlic and detroy it's enzyme this cascade stops and the beneficial nutrient is no longer produced. Granted it's not a total effect because some of this nutrient will be produced but to a lesser extent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
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Originally Posted by Mr. Sun View Post

^^^ yup, that's why lots of the rawfoodists live in sunny, warm climates, lol.
Hmm...then I guess this Michigander will never become a rawfoodist!!!

(although we ARE having unseasonably warm weather, like 25 degrees above normal!)
 

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Originally Posted by veggiemama-of2 View Post

Hmm...then I guess this Michigander will never become a rawfoodist!!!

(although we ARE having unseasonably warm weather, like 25 degrees above normal!)
Yes, Gobal Warming will certainly bring many more cooked-fooders into the raw-food movement. But you get a discount if you join now so you'd better put down the applesauce and pick up a juicy, ripe apple.



^^

Mr. Sun shines down on Michigan.
 
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