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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just for the record, this is in the middle of my junior year and I'm not actually applying to colleges yet. HOWEVER, in less than a year, I will be
yikes. So, here's my practice college app essay. Sorry, it's a tad long..that will be worked on... Thanks! vvv

But what do you eat? How do you get your protein? These questions fall into the category of those that make vegetarians want to shove hunks of tofu into their ears. Throughout the past few years that Ive been a vegetarian, inquiries such as these have been a reality of my life. Reactions to my vegetarianism have oscillated on a scale ranging from pleasantly intrigued with other responses closer to outright displays of ignorance. In addition to the struggle of dealing with interpersonal reactions, imagine living in a world where the majority of the options are certainly not tailored to your own eating habits. Vegetarianism can often feel like being a dietary hermit, your choices isolated from the norm. In the long-run, however, these setbacks are more than worth it.

At the tender age of twelve, I marched out of my room in a dignified manner right before lunchtime and proudly declared to my parents that I was now a vegetarian. After exposure to the realities of animal treatment through a poignant, tear-inducing video, I had made a choice of compassion, feeling unable to personally justify my consumption of meat. Unfortunately, the two influential individuals whom I had expected be most supportive of my newfound dietary path, mom and dad, were my first and most ardent disapprovers. They assailed me with the usual omnivorous propaganda about how I needed meat to grow up healthy and strong. They fretted deeply at the thought of their carnivorous flower of a daughter wilting like a, well, vegetable. And I, unaccustomed to my principles being challenged, initially did wilt -- resolve-wise. My mom prepared chicken sandwiches for lunch on that day, and I did indeed eat them, along with various other forms of animals in the days that followed. Cognitive dissonance is an insidious creature, though, and the contrast between my morals and my dietary habits quickly became unbearable.

I was to become a vegetarian, regardless of my dietetic critics. This novel situation was a well-orchestrated test of my convictions, and I was not one to fail. I learned that ultimately one must stand up for what he or she considers to be right and face opposition with confidence, even when the opposition may stem from loved ones. Opposition is not a burden under which to collapse in impotence; it is a camouflaged opportunity to become even stronger in ones convictions. So, I took charge of the opportunity at hand and used it to bolster my independence. I started researching vegetarian nutrition online, cooking my own meals, and learning to say nothank you to offers of meat. Several PETA leaflets and packages of veggie burgers later, I had at last gained the support of my parental figures. Taking my diet into my own hands was not easy, especially not at the initial expense of my parents support, but I eventually attained respect for standing up for what I believed in and learned an important lesson in individualism.

One of the major hurdles in my quest for vegetarianism was preparing my own food. Not only was I accustomed to my mother coddling me with home-cooked meals, but I was also obviously used to including meat as a crucial food group. In a meat-dominated society, crafting vegetarian meals required an abundance of creativity. Nevertheless, slowly but surely, I acquired an inventive flair for developing meatless versions of my comfort foods. Crumbled veggie burgers made for a satisfactory substitute for ground beef in spaghetti or tacos. Lentil soup was a swell alternative to the traditional chicken noodle. I was transforming into a vegetarian cordon-bleu. There was still the occasional criticism to be faced, though, as lunchtime dining at school often involved xenophobic, upturned noses at the sight of my homemade tofu. All the same, this culinary intolerance only encouraged me to further my indulgences in foreign foods and become a more open-minded individual overall.

Yet despite all of this innovative vegetarian cuisine, I still encountered the need for temptation resistance at times. Although Ive never been a huge fan of meat, every now and then a craving would sneak up on me. Eating at a Chinese restaurant might stir up an unexpected desire for mandarin chicken, and an internal battle would have to be waged between the angel and devil on each of my shoulders. The angel, however, would win, and the abstinence actually made me feel stronger in my integrity. Perhaps, if I could resist the urge to eat meat, then I could also resist the urge to watch The Office before doing my homework or the urge to frivolously spend thirty bucks on that new shirt I dont need. Resisting the temptation of meat paved an entirely new path of self-discipline.

Vegetarianism became more than a dietary preference, even more than just an ethical way of life -- it transformed my life. At the outset, vegetarianism seemingly presented me with little more than a host of challenges, yet it was genuinely a chance to overcome the challenges and grow from them as a person. Although vegetarians may stereotypically be seen as radical hippies on the fringe of society, my vegetarianism has conversely given me the tools to contribute to society in a radical, positive way.
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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What kind of college essay question is that? The Essay you write will likely be in response to a question they ask, at least it has always been for the colleges I applied to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's just "topic of your choice." Yeah, for specific colleges there will probably be a specific essay question that I'll have to respond to on the supplement app for whatever college it is. However, most colleges use the common app too and my essay would fit under the common app's questions of either "topic of your choice" or "Evaluate a significant experience, achievement, risk you have taken, or ethical dilemma you have faced and its impact on you."
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikikaylen View Post

It's just "topic of your choice." Yeah, for specific colleges there will probably be a specific essay question that I'll have to respond to on the supplement app for whatever college it is. However, most colleges use the common app too and my essay would fit under the common app's questions of either "topic of your choice" or "Evaluate a significant experience, achievement, risk you have taken, or ethical dilemma you have faced and its impact on you."
Wow when I went to college they were so much more specific than that.
 
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