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<b>Vegan Diets</b>: This is the strictest of all the vegetarian options, as vegans, which is the name for individuals who follow a vegan diet, avoid ALL foods from animal sources. In other words, at a barbecue, the only part of the cheeseburger that a vegan could eat would be the bun, pickle, and ketchup, as these foods are from plant sources. The ground beef burger and the cheese (both derived from a cow) would be off limits. A savvy hostess would need to grill up soy burgers and top them with a slice of soy cheese to satisfy the palates of her vegan guests.<br><br><br><br><br><br><b>Lacto-Vegetarian Diets</b>: A less strict vegetarian is one who follows a lacto-vegetarian diet. Similarly to vegans, lacto-vegetarians avoid all foods from animal sources except for dairy foods, such as milk, yogurt, and cheese (lacto means dairy). At a barbecue, you would find the lacto-vegetarian also hunting for a soy burger to sandwich between her bun, but the burger could be topped with the same cheddar cheese that the carnivorous, or meat-eating, guests are enjoying. The lacto-vegetarian would also be able to enjoy the make-your-own sundae ice cream (dairy) dessert. Unfortunately, the strict vegans at this barbecue, who are looking for a sweet ending to their meal, would have to hope that a fruit sorbet (a blend of puree fruit and a sweetener) is also a dessert option.<br><br><br><br><br><br><b>Lacto-Ovo-Vegetarian Diets</b>: A vegetarian-style diet that allows even more flexibility in is the lacto-ovo vegetarian diet, which includes not only dairy foods but also eggs (ovo means eggs). Omelets, scrambled eggs, and products made with eggs can appear in the lacto-ovo vegetarian’s repertoire of menu options. At a barbecue, the lacto-ovo vegetarian would not only be able to enjoy a soy burger topped with cheddar cheese as well as the ice cream dessert, but she could also devour the tasty deviled egg appetizers.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Flexitarian Diet: The latest vegetarian diet to make its way on the eating scene is the flexitarian diet or a "part time" vegetarian diet. Flexitarians are vegetarians who sometimes eat meat, fish, and poultry. For the flexitarians at a barbecue, the sky is the limit as there wouldn't be any foods on the buffet table that they would need to avoid, especially if this happens to be their meat-eating night.<br><br><br><br><br><br><i><b>- By Joan Salge Blake, MS, RD, LDN. Blake is a nutrition professor at Boston University and a nationally known writer, lecturer and nutrition expert.</b></i><br><br><br><br><i>I get the vegan thing and even the lacto/ovo diets, for that is what my daughter is. But what the heck is a flexiterian. I mean aren;t the average folks out there flexies. That; to me is like saying I am a part time alcoholic, or a part time drug addict. Granted, those are far fethced examples, but you get my meaning. And all this from a nutrition professor...what is this world coming to</i>???<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:">
 

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maybe someone who makes a conscious effort to reduce the amount of meat they consume, but still eats meat sometimes?<br><br><br><br>
for example.. my friend used to eat meat for every meal but has now done some thinking about vegetarianism and tries to only eat meat once or twice a week now. true, it's not vegetarianism, but it's still a step in the right direction.
 

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I suppose my kids could be considered a flextarian. They eat meat a few times a week. Hubby is a meat eater and if I make a meat dish that the kids really like then I give them the option. If we are eating out they will usually choose chicken nuggets or a cheeseburger.<br><br><br><br>
Another thought that comes to mind is a person that will eat meat as long as it is free range organic but due to monetary concerns eats vegetarian a good portion of the time. That was me for a few months before becoming vegetarian. Although I didn't consider myself a vegetarian then.
 

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A person who eats vegetarian meals every meal except "sunday dinner" when he eats meat is still cutting way down on meat. I wouldn't call this vegetarian really. I'd say an omnivore who eats limited meat.
 
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i've got a friend who is working on becoming more vegetarian, and she now sees herself as more of a flexitarian. she'll go with the veggie version of a meal at a restaurant if one is available, she'll pick tofu dogs over hotdogs, and veggie burgers over beef burgers if they're available at a barbeque, she omits meat from her own meals when she's cooking, but if someone else is cooking for her, say at a family function, she'll eat what they've prepared graciously. if she's really craving chicken, for example, then she'll go with the free run, organic, hormone and drug free version, and feel like she's making a small step in the right direction.<br><br><br><br>
for her, i think it is a step in the right direction. there is more chance of her ending up as a long term vegetarian this way, than if she went right at it- she's tried, and failed, quite a few times (don't get me started on why, lol!) and was on the verge of jacking it all in, and resigning herself to being an omni before i suggested trying this- and i think she is making a small difference in the grander scheme of things, with her concious choices and actions.
 

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I think there are probably tons of "flexitarians" floating around but few who would call themselves such or who have ever heard the term.<br><br><br><br>
My best friend might qualify as a 'flexitarian' because she doesn't eat beef or pork and purchases lots of soy products. Similarly, my parents enjoy lots of vegetarian food and, on average, eat meat just once a day.<br><br><br><br>
Its a weird term because there is also a seperation between someone who eats meat once a week and someone who eats meat once a day, but both are better off than the majority of the public.
 

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Personally, I'd much rather someone call themselves Flexitarian than I would for them to call themselves "pescatarian", "bovotarian" or "pollotarian". It just seems more accurate, IMO.
 

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That description is nonsense because it states "Flexitarians <i>are vegetarians</i> who sometimes eat meat, fish, and poultry". You are not a non-meat-eater if you sometimes eat meat.
 

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Emm.. A barbecue buffet that consists of burgers with cheese, catsup and pickles as the only toppings, deviled eggs and ice cream? I don't feel I'm missing much in this case.
 

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IMO, the term "flexitarian" should only be used for people who are actually making an effort in cutting out meat products, and perhaps wanting to eventually become vegetarian. Those who at least have an interest in a more cruelty free lifestyle. I think it's better than someone saying "I'm a vegetarian, but I eat meat sometimes" -as we all know that is not a vegetarian, but by saying "I'm a flexitarian" that shows others that they're conscience of animal suffering and making an effort to reduce and be a lesser part of that. I'd just hate to see the term be abused.
 

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vegans are far from the most strict vegetarian diets...<br><br><br><br>
Ms. Blake should take a peek at Raw Fruitarianism.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rolleyes:">
 

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I also like how she said a vegan option at a bbq was a bun,pickle,and ketchup. how tasty.<br><br><br><br>
the funny thing is, is that the bun probably isn't vegan, and the ketchup has hfcs. so our option would be the jar of pickles. yum.
 

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I don't see where there's a problem. A person who is a 'flexitarian' is not calling themselves vegan or even vegetarian. Probably what this entails is that the person would eat a vegetarian diet at home, and an omni diet when that was what was available elsewhere (for instance at a barbeque). Is there something wrong with having a word for that kind of diet? I'm glad that omnis are thinking more about their diets and how much meat they want to give up if this is the case...and also where there meat comes from. If there needs to be a new word for someone who tries to eat a mostly vegetarian diet, I don't see it as a problem. I guess I'm not quite understanding why you seem so flabberghasted.<br><br><br><br>
B
 

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I don't understand what needs to be explained? The text that was quoted in the OP explains what Flexitarianism is. It's someone who eats a mostly vegetarian diet, but occassionally eats non-vegetarian food. /shrug
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>troub</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
all americans are vegan between meals.</div>
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Not if they're wearing non-vegan clothes or makeup.<br><br><br><br>
I think it's pretty ridiculous to use the terms flexitarian, pescetarian, pollo-vegetarian. If you are not devoted to a veg*n lifestyle and eat meat "only sometimes", you're an omni.<br><br><br><br>
Also, that article is horribly biased.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Unfortunately, the strict vegans at this barbecue, who are looking for a sweet ending to their meal, would have to hope that a fruit sorbet (a blend of puree fruit and a sweetener) is also a dessert option.</div>
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Makes it seem like vegans are soooo miserable because the only dessert they could eat was this fruit sorbet in question.<br><br>
And lacto-ovos get to "enjoy" eggs. Mmmmm, vegans are so deprived.
 

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Only on this message board have I heard someone refer to themselves as an omni. Never in real life do you ever hear someone say "I'm an omni". It's rediculous to assert that people should refer to themselves as such.<br><br>
I just absolutely don't see what's wrong with using terms like flexitarian, pescatarian, and so forth.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>*Sunflower*</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Not if they're wearing non-vegan clothes or makeup.<br><br><br><br>
I think it's pretty ridiculous to use the terms flexitarian, pescetarian, pollo-vegetarian. If you are not devoted to a veg*n lifestyle and eat meat "only sometimes", you're an omni.<br><br><br><br><b>Also, that article is horribly biased.</b><br><br><br><br>
Makes it seem like vegans are soooo miserable because the only dessert they could eat was this fruit sorbet in question.<br><br>
And lacto-ovos get to "enjoy" eggs. Mmmmm, vegans are so deprived.</div>
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My emphasis<br><br>
I totally agree. Yes, vegans are SO deprived. The article was way biased.<br><br>
AS far as 'flextarian' goes, it's someone desperate to attach a label to their lifestyle.<br><br>
If you don't eat meat, you're a vegetarian. If you do, even part time, you're not. That simple.<br><br>
So now anyone who doesn't eat meat EVERY meal is a part time vegetarian? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"><br><br>
Mary
 
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