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Longtime vegetarian
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I rarely buy or use dairy products any more, but since I still occasionally do, I can't call myself vegan. But in my attempts to further phase out dairy altogether, I've been trying some old favorite dishes by substituting vegan ingredients. One thing I'm just not sure about is cooking/baking with soy milk.

I generally buy vanilla soy milk because I like it; I use that on cereal, in my coffee, and to drink as is. However, I'm getting some plain soy milk tomorrow, with the idea that I'll use it in certain dishes.

So my question is: what about cooking with soy milk?

I'm going to attempt rice pudding, using the vanilla soy milk; the recipe I plan to use calls for baking the pudding at 275 degrees for approximately 3 hours. What I definitely DON'T want at the end of that is an awful/burnt-tasting/yucky-tasting mess! Does soy milk hold up to baking like cow's milk?

And what about plain soy milk? If I use it for something like cream gravy, i.e., making a roux first with olive oil [or margarine, I suppose] and flour, and then adding in the soy milk and cooking until it's a nice, creamy consistency, does it work like dairy milk?

Is there anything in particular I should be aware of when cooking/baking with soy milk?
 

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I use unsweetened almond milk as a base for creamy pasta sauce and it works perfectly. I've never tried it with soy but I can't see why it would be any different.
 

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Longtime vegetarian
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I use unsweetened almond milk as a base for creamy pasta sauce and it works perfectly.
Thanks for that info. It's interesting, especially because...

I've never tried it with soy but I can't see why it would be any different.
...the thing that actually got me to wondering about it is this: when I've put almond milk (vanilla flavored) in my coffee, it made the coffee taste TERRIBLE. :eek: Like a burnt, off...awful taste. I've tried it multiple times, always with the same result, so it's not just some fluke. I figured the heat of the coffee did something to the almond milk that resulted in that really disgusting, dump-it-in-the-sink taste. Although soy milk doesn't do that, I'm still a little unsure if it might react badly with extended and/or high heat, as in cooking/baking.
 

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I really dislike both soy and almond in HOT coffee! Cold however, I do. I love cold coffee with half chocolate almond, or soy.

For cooking soy works fine. I bought a soy milk machine because I found I like it completely plain most, and can flavor it myself. Many soy milks labeled plain still have things like carageenan, or even sugars added. the aeseptic boxes are most likely just beans and water.
I can't remember when I last made a cream gravy where I just used milk. I usually use pureed mushrooms, herbs and water to the roux, although I do sometimes add some soy milk afterwards.

I do make puddings with soy milk. It works fine, and I'll get vanilla soy creamer esp for it sometimes. Like 1/2 cup creamer to 1 1/2 cups plain milk. I think it's 1/3 cup cornstarch and (?)sugar. Same as regular pudding recipe.
I haven't made rice pudding like that. I loved my granmothers rice pudding that was baked and had a custard layer on top--if you can do that let me know!
I've made rice pudding like with canned coconut milk, cinnamon and raisins.

What is the rice pudding recipe?
 

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It's funny, I've never really thought about it as I blithely pour soy milk into things that call for milk. Can't say I've had a flop yet. My roux is fine - even make a mean cheeze sauce. However, I haven't had dairy milk for so long now that perhaps my taste buds have just got used to the different flavour (if there is one).
I use a plain organic soy for all of my cooking needs. (Unless recipe says almond or other types).
Good luck with it .... there's always a bit of a "fear" when you're trying something new.
 

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Oh yeah, I forgot about nutritional yeast sauces! That's a roux with soy milk and it's fine!
 

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Longtime vegetarian
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I really dislike both soy and almond in HOT coffee! Cold however, I do. I love cold coffee with half chocolate almond, or soy.
I love iced coffee! :)

For cooking soy works fine.
Great! That's what I needed to know.

I bought a soy milk machine because I found I like it completely plain most, and can flavor it myself.
You're much more energetic than I am. :eek:

I do make puddings with soy milk. It works fine, and I'll get vanilla soy creamer esp for it sometimes. Like 1/2 cup creamer to 1 1/2 cups plain milk. I think it's 1/3 cup cornstarch and (?)sugar. Same as regular pudding recipe.
I haven't made rice pudding like that. I loved my granmothers rice pudding that was baked and had a custard layer on top--if you can do that let me know!
I've made rice pudding like with canned coconut milk, cinnamon and raisins.
It was my grandmother's rice pudding that gives me such fond memories of rice pudding. We're Armenian, and we share a lot of dishes with Greeks, so I'm not really sure where her recipe originated. But it included raisins (either black or golden), plus vanilla and cinnamon, and it was baked--and OH SO GOOD. Years ago, I bought a wonderful cookbook called "Greek Vegetarian Cookery" and it has a recipe for rice pudding that SERIOUSLY reminded me of my grandmother's. I'd use it...except I can't find it right now. (It's somewhere in my garage, still packed in a box from when I moved...nine years ago...) So, I looked around online, and had to keep skipping over the recipes that called for eggs; I finally hit on...

What is the rice pudding recipe?
...this recipe, which is what I'm going to use. (And, yes, I KNOW the recipe says plain as day to use soy milk, bake it for three hours, etc., but just because some random person on the Internet SAYS something works, doesn't necessarily MEAN it works, you know?! Hence my questions in this thread about cooking/baking with soy milk. :))
 

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Riot Nrrrd
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when I've put almond milk (vanilla flavored) in my coffee, it made the coffee taste TERRIBLE.
Almond milk doesn't work in coffee. But you probably figured that out. :)

I've never tried soymilk in coffee. I've used commercial soy creamer in ice cream for it's fat content.

I've never made a recipe that called for cow's milk where soy milk didn't work as a substitute seemlessly. You can even clabber it! (You won't get clabbered milk, so if that's your recipe your outta luck. But as an ingredient in buttermilk style biscuits, yum)
 

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Chaotic Vegetarian
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Soy in coffee and chicorée : yes but the taste is completely different than with milk.
Same fore the rice pudding, and... "bread pudding" too ? It's old bread soaked in soy or oat milk with plenty of sugar and spices, baked in the oven. I use soy together with eggs for quiche and waffles, also pancakes. And I mix soy milk with about 1/4 water, it makes the bottle last longer.
 

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...this recipe, which is what I'm going to use. (And, yes, I KNOW the recipe says plain as day to use soy milk, bake it for three hours, etc., but just because some random person on the Internet SAYS something works, doesn't necessarily MEAN it works, you know?! Hence my questions in this thread about cooking/baking with soy milk. :))
Wow. I don't think I'd trust three hours oven time! :eek:
I made one like this, but with coconut milk (canned) and no nuts-
http://www.food.com/recipe/quick-vegan-raisin-rice-pudding-467849

I would buy soy creamer- like Trader Joes or Silk- vanilla, and use half and half soy milk

The soy milk machine is very easy to use and clean-and cheap. You get okara - soy bean pulp- to use in recipes. It does other things too
 

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Soymilk has generally similar properties compared to dairy milk in baking and cooking. I think it has a little lower boiling point, but that would only be an issue for cooking on the stovetop, not for baking at a relatively low temperature like you will be for the rice pudding. I would keep an eye on your pudding toward the end of baking just to be sure that it doesn't burn, as the cooking time may be slightly different.
 
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