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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bought a bag of Bob's Red Mill flaxseed meal. I'm finding all these great recipes for flaxseed meal now, but I recall that cooking breaks down(whatever that means!) the omega-3 fats that I specifically bought the meal for. I ahven't been able to find any info on this. I was thinking I'd just like add it to cooked oatmeal to be safe, but if I can make things like muffins and still get the omega-3s, it'd be great.<br><br><br><br>
Could this mean the flax-supplemented baked/frozen goods that are sold commercially are not what they're cracked up to be? That is, do their claims of containing omega-3 stand?
 

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I have not heard of cooking breaking down the omega 3's in flax and I cook with it all the time. That dosnt mean that it dosnt happen but I have never heard of it breaking down compleatly, maybe some.<br><br>
BTW if you have a health food store near you can buy flax seeds for super cheap, I think I pay like 78 cents a pound for them and grind them up in a coffee grinder to make flax meal.<br><br>
Bob's red mill preground flax here costs almost 4 $ for a pound!
 

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anatta, I have heard that too, but haven't been able to find any sort of consensus on the issue. It has been discussed here at vb also.
 

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baking things with flaxseed meal will not cause damage to the flaxseed. the temperature inside the product (e.g. bread) does not get high enough to degrade the fats.<br><br><br><br>
on the other hand, cooking on the stovetop with with, say flaxseed oil--the temperature would certainly get high enough to destroy the fats.
 

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<a href="http://www.silanutrition.com/flaxomfa.html#bake" target="_blank">http://www.silanutrition.com/flaxomfa.html#bake</a>
 

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One way I use ground flaxseed (and I grind my own like Ayrlin) is in my fresh fruit smoothie every morning. I grind two tablespoons in a coffee grinder, then toss it in the blender with my juice, soymilk, 1/2 banana and berries. It sure keeps you regular! Plus you aren't cooking the flax. But to focus on your worries, I concur with catswym about baking flax. Last I heard, it is not a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks! I think I'll try them in muffins. =) I did get the bag of ground flax for a pretty good price - it's $2 for the one pound. Currently, I don't have a way to grind flaxseeds.
 

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I use this recipe for crunchy granola:<br><br><a href="http://www.recipezaar.com/31235" target="_blank">http://www.recipezaar.com/31235</a><br><br>
Except I usually leave out the nuts, add a liberal amount of cinnamon, and dump in a ton of flax seed meal. It's delicious and healthy and my omni family seems to enjoy it.<br><br><br><br>
I also add in a heaping tablespoon or so into a batch of homemade hummus. You can't taste it.<br><br>
HTH,<br><br>
~Wonder <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:">
 

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I keep mine in the freezer. Just like brown rice and anything high in oil.<br><br>
~Wonder <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:">
 

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I found this at:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.barleans.com/literature/flax/71-flax-muffin-a-day.html" target="_blank">http://www.barleans.com/literature/f...fin-a-day.html</a><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Long Used for Baking<br><br>
Flaxseed was once a staple food source used by the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, supplying ample amounts of valuable essential fatty acids, amino acids, protein, dietary fiber and cancer preventing phytonutrients. Unfortunately, within the last 100 years, modern methods of food processing, combined with preferences for wheat and other less nutritious enriched grain products, have removed many of these essential and vital nutrients from our food chain.<br><br><br><br>
Nutrition research on flaxseed has confirmed it's potential as a new (actually ancient) ingredient for breads, buns, and other bakery products. Ground flaxseed (flaxseed flour) can be added to almost any baked product and adds a nutty flavor to bread, waffles, pancakes, and other products if it composes a minimum of six to eight percent of the dry ingredient of the recipe or formula. Some other food uses for ground flaxseed include, but are not limited to, fiber and nutrition bars, protein powders, pastries, pastas, bagels, muffins, crackers, cookies, and cereals, as well as soup and bakery mixes. When partially defatted flaxseed flour is used in baked products, the oil in the recipe can be reduced by the amount of the oil in the added flaxseed (which is usually approximately 10 percent). Gluten content should be balanced in yeast-leavened products. Flaxseed is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for inclusion in foods.<br><br><br><br>
Flaxseed can be used to reduce the oil or shortening specified in a recipe because of its high oil content. If a recipe calls for 1/3 cup of oil, replace with 1 cup of ground flaxseed a 3:1 substitution ratio. As an alternative, the flour specified in a recipe can be reduced by 25 percent and replaced with ground flaxseed.<br><br><br><br>
Baked goods tend to brown more quickly if flaxseed is substituted in the recipe. Whole flaxseed can be used to add crunch and taste to a bread dough, pancake, muffin or cookie mix. In any form, you're always adding to the nutritional value of your diet!<br><br><br><br>
Flax can be used in baking (e.g., muffins and bread), salad dressings and in smoothies as well as many other tasty dishes. Although many persons believe that flax is too fragile to be used as a cooking oil, this may not be true, reports flax expert Clara Felix.<br><br><br><br>
"The recorded use of flaxseed oil as a cooking oil goes as far back as nine thousand years in area of the Near East," she says. "Soldiers of the Roman Empire marched with rations of bread baked with flaxseed. China, the third largest flax grower in the world, has used flaxseed as a food oil for at least five thousand years. Germany uses 66,000 tons of flaxseed a year in baked breads and buns. Recent studies show little or no loss of [alpha-linolenic acid] when milled flaxseed is baked as an ingredient in muffins or breads. Cooking also doesn't cause [alpha-linolenic acid] or other fatty acids to oxidize (break down). Baking and cooking seldom expose fats and oils to temperature above the boiling point (212ºF or 100ºC)." Felix adds that in one study, stir-frying with flaxseed oil seemed to be okay if the oil temperature was kept below 300ºF but that at higher temperatures, a fishy odor was detected, and significant levels of oxidation appeared.<br><br><br><br>
"I've been recommending flax seeds and flax seed oil for years," says Christiane Northrup, M.D., one of America's leading experts on women's health. "Flax seed is the highest known source of anti-cancer and phytoestrogenic compounds known as lignans, a concentration more than 100 times greater than other lignan-containing foods such as grains, fruits, and vegetables. Lignans are plant substances that get broken down by intestinal bacteria into two main mammalian lignans, senterodiol and enteolactone. These lignans then circulate through the liver and are later excreted in the urine. There are a number of reasons why we all should be interested in incorporating more lignans into our diet. The following are some of the most compelling. Lignans have potent anti-cancer effects. An impressive number of studies have shown that flax seed lignans are very potent anti-cancer agents for both breast and colon cancer because of their ability to modulate the production, availability, and action of hormones produced in our bodies. Lignans are potent phytoestrogens. In women who consume flax seed oil, studies have shown significant hormonal changes and decreased estradiol levels alterations similar to those seen with soy isoflavones. This makes flax seed oil or meal a great choice for women who can't use soy or who simply want another source of phytohormones."
 
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