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i eat a lot of veggies, but they are almost always cooked in some form. what i want to know is if it is still full of nutrients by the time it gets to my plate.

i've heard steaming veggies is good for keeping nutrients (note - i've not made any research myself on this), but i'm not sure about other ways to cook them. i shallow fry or wok fry quite a lot of veggies, but i don't know if this keeps the nutrients or not. i'm guessing deep frying isn't good at all, but i don't know. how about roasting?

thanks


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Steaming vegetables is a good way to keep in most of the nutrients. They say that if you are boiling your vegetables most of the nutrients gets transfered into the water and you should reserve that water for other uses in your meals (ex: gravy etc). Vitamin C is one vitamin that is lost when vegetables are boiled, or cooked for a long period of time in water or air (boiling or microwaving).

So if you want to keep the most nutrients and still have cooked vegetables I would say steam them for no longer than 5 minutes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Presto View Post

Steaming vegetables is a good way to keep in most of the nutrients. They say that if you are boiling your vegetables most of the nutrients gets transfered into the water and you should reserve that water for other uses in your meals (ex: gravy etc). Vitamin C is one vitamin that is lost when vegetables are boiled, or cooked for a long period of time in water or air (boiling or microwaving).

So if you want to keep the most nutrients and still have cooked vegetables I would say steam them for no longer than 5 minutes.
Yep, and raw is even better.
 

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I generally stir fry vegies with a little oil and no water, or steam them. The only exception is when I make soup, or stew-- in that case, you are eating the liquid too in the broth. Microwave is another possiblity. So is roasting. Raw means more vitamins, but more of a chance of food posioning.
 

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I just eat lots of veggies in whatever form is tasty, affordable and convenient and don't worry much about the nutritional value of individual veggies. I have been known to drink the liquid that spinach was cooked in, but that's mostly because I think it tastes good.
 
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