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Not going to lie, I cooked a lasagna with it last night and ended up picking it all out. I used the extra firm type. I dont plan on cooking with it again anytime soon.<br><br><br><br>
I find this a little discouraging as I want to start veering towards vegan in the next couple of months.<br><br><br><br>
Is there anyone on here who had similar experience? Maybe it will grow on me?
 

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Tofu in lasagne does not sound very nice, especially firm tofu. I rather like tofu and I can't say I'd personally enjoy it much like that. I'd go and eat it at a good Asian restaurant first. Salt and pepper tofu, or sesame or something.<br><br><br><br>
Even if you don't like it, it's not like it's a required food or anything.
 

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I've recently become vegan and can't stand tofu at all, so it's possible to be vegan without it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br>
I usually use regular soya protein for meat substitutes, or cook dishes that were intended to be meat-free.
 

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I was vegetarian for 10 years before I tried tofu. I tried it by having it in a very good Thai restaurant, and it was delicious! It inspired me to learn how to cook with it, and now I have it regularly.
 

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How did you use it in the lasagna? did you use a recipe? blend it with herbs and a touch of lemon and salt? add it plain?
 

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if you were using the tofu for its creaminess, you could instead make some cashew cream (with raw cashews, water, salt and a blender) or something.
 

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I've yet to eat anything made with extra firm tofu that's even remotely palatable. I don't know why it exists (and I LOVE tofu).<br><br><br><br>
I'd suggest not using tofu as a replacement in traditionally non-tofu recipes. Instead, try it at some Thai, Japanese, Korean, or Chinese restaurants, see what you like, and mimic from there. It's good stuff. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I have only tried cooking with extra firm tofu and was not pleased with the results either. I think I am just not a fan of the flavor. Also, I tend not to like any of the faux meats they sell at the grocery store. No matter what faux meat it is, I feel like each variety tastes the same. I know tofu and faux meat are not essential to a veg*n diet, so I think I will give up on both for now, save for when I am out to eat.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Moo55</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I was vegetarian for 10 years before I tried tofu. I tried it by having it in a very good Thai restaurant, and it was delicious! It inspired me to learn how to cook with it, and now I have it regularly.</div>
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20 years for me...and I eat it here and there its not a fave<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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It would be helpful to know how you cooked it. It can be okay if mixed with some other things and used as a "ricotta." Tofu doesn't work well for everything, I would be hesitant to use it as a meat replacer in lasagna because of the consistency.
 

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I agree with everybody who said eat it at a restaurant first. I like tofu, I just am not that great at cooking it. There's a recipe somewhere on this board for honey fried tofu (sounds disgusting at first, but it's good), and that's basically the best I can make. I just did tofu scramble tonight, and it didn't turn out too horribly.<br><br><br><br>
A trick if you're going to stir-fry it is marinade it for a couple of hours. When I first went veg, I didn't do that, so I couldn't get it to taste good. Oddly enough, my omni mom told me to do that. o_O I hadn't realized she liked tofu (then again, my step-dad probably told her it was chicken or something-he did that to me when I wasn't veg. He told me the tofu was chicken <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> ).
 

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I'd reiterate the advice above to try it at a restaurant first, my all time favorite food is deep fried silken tofu with a sweetened soy sauce that a Japanese restaurant serves near us.<br><br><br><br>
Although I do love tofu I've also seen it cooked in some pretty horrible ways, the college I live at insists on steaming it, and not adding any sauce, it's completely disgusting. I have used it in lasagna before though, I'm fond of fairly spicy lasagnas and I'll often have a layer of well blended silken tofu and firm tofu, spiced up with sweet chilli sauce, and what other herbs I felt like at the time, between layers of veggies and sauce.<br><br><br><br>
I also love firm tofu just taken out of the packet and sliced and then fried or baked and covered in a rich satay sauce with rice, it is absolutely heavenly.<br><br><br><br>
When cooking tofu though, don't treat it as a stand alone it's the sort of food that soaks up the flavors around it, and needs additional flavors to be palatable.
 

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Poorly prepared tofu can be not very good at all but I have yet to meet someone who didin't like tofu when it was prepared in one of many many different ways.<br><br><br><br>
Find a recommended recipe, follow it, and enjoy. If you try and use tofu on your own without knowing what you're doing then don't be surprised if you don't like it. One of the most common mistakes I've seen is people using silken tofu in place of fresh tofu. That can be disastrous.
 

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I remember the first time I cooked with tofu too - many years ago - and never thought I would ever like it.<br><br><br><br>
You need to find the taste and texture that you like. Tofu is tasteless, you need to add flavour. It can also be jelly-like in texture - something that doesn't appeal to me.<br><br><br><br>
It is important to not get your firm and silken tofus mixed up. Silken is great in sauces, firm for a meat replacement.<br><br>
For firm - drain it first - either squeeze the liquid out, or leave to drain on a plate with cling film on top, and a few heavy books on top of it!<br><br>
To give firm tofu even firmer texture, freeze it first. This gives it a thicker texture.<br><br><br><br>
Here's a couple of recipes to try, where the tofu is packed with flavour, and has a nice texture.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://v-foody.blogspot.com/2010/01/fried-rice-with-hot-leek-sauce.html" target="_blank">http://v-foody.blogspot.com/2010/01/...eek-sauce.html</a><br><br><br><br><a href="http://v-foody.blogspot.com/2010/01/scrambled-tofu.html" target="_blank">http://v-foody.blogspot.com/2010/01/scrambled-tofu.html</a><br><br><br><br>
With the scrambled tofu, you can add whatever herbs and spices you like best - so you could add an Italian twist by using basil, oregano, sundried tomatoes and olives instead of the spices.<br><br><br><br>
Don't give up on tofu just yet - give it another chance - I did and I have never regretted it!
 

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I've been a Vegan for coming up on two years and I rarely cook tofu, so don't let it stop you from going Vegan. My first few experiences cooking tofu were not good ones. When I use it now I get the extra firm that is already cubed up. I wrap it in paper towels and press by stacking a couple plates on it for at least a half an hour, or other times I bake it in the oven for a bit.<br><br><br><br>
Since I only prepare tofu at home about once a month, I'm not the best person to advise you on cooking it properly. I just wanted to post to let you know you can become a happy healthy Vegan long term, without letting the fact that like many other people you can't seem to make tofu come out they way you would hope get in the way.
 

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It's all in the preparation. My omni fiance will eat a pound of tofu in a sitting, if I don't grab some out first for myself. Reiterating WonderRandy's questions -- how exactly did you use the tofu?! Well seasoned tofu ricotta is quite good in lasagna (generally lemon juice, nutritional yeast, garlic, oregano, salt), but if you just opened up the package and slopped it in there -- probably would taste squishy and watery and beany.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>rabid_child</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
It's all in the preparation. My omni fiance will eat a pound of tofu in a sitting, if I don't grab some out first for myself. Reiterating WonderRandy's questions -- how exactly did you use the tofu?! Well seasoned tofu ricotta is quite good in lasagna (generally lemon juice, nutritional yeast, garlic, oregano, salt), but if you just opened up the package and slopped it in there -- probably would taste squishy and watery and beany.</div>
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<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:"><br><br><br><br><span style="color:#008000;">I have a really tasty lasagna recipe that I use from <i>Vegan Planet</i> where tofu is substituted for ricotta. It's blended with spinach and it turns out being really good. With tofu, it's all how you prepare it and how it's seasoned.</span>
 
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