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I was recently on another message board where people were talking about veganism and how much of a hassle it is for other people (omni's). Other people chimed in and talked about they have a vegan friend/family member and how annoying their veganism is and how complicated it is for them to find something to eat.<br><br><br><br>
Some of them mentioned that they were thinking of becoming "convenience vegans." In other words, they're vegans when it's convenient for them (like when they're cooking meals for themselves), but will go back to eating animal products when it's not convenient (dinners at friends houses, parties, lunch with coworkers, certain restaurants where there's no vegan option, things like that).<br><br><br><br>
What do you all think of this? On one hand, at least they're <i>trying</i>. And they are eating less animal products, which is great. But on the other hand, they are kinda giving off the message that they don't care about enough about animals/health/environment/whatever to go completely vegan. Is it really right to compromise your morals and values just because somethings inconvenient?<br><br><br><br>
I read this on that other board and thought I'd come here and get your opinions.
 

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If I saw someone beating a dog I would only call the SPCA if it was convenient. Otherwise I would just go about my day and not let it worry me.
 

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I think every little bit helps, so I wouldn't put someone down for only eating dairy when they go out to restaurants. I just wouldn't want them to call themselves vegan at all, if dairy's ever ok with them.
 

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I do that, but I don't call myself a vegan. I know most other people don't have vegan margarine, soymilk, and egg replacements, so I'm a little more lenient outside of my house. I avoid the big things as best I can and always go for the items with the least amount of non-vegan items in them. I know I could be "more vegan" but I'm not worried about the .5% of the time I eat non-vegan foods.<br><br>
~Wondre <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>~Wonder</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I do that, but I don't call myself a vegan. I know most other people don't have vegan margarine, soymilk, and egg replacements, so I'm a little more lenient outside of my house. I avoid the big things as best I can and always go for the items with the least amount of non-vegan items in them. I know I could be "more vegan" but I'm not worried about the .5% of the time I eat non-vegan foods.<br><br>
~Wondre <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:"></div>
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This is how I am now as well, and it works for me. I probably eat non vegan foods a little more than .5% but i still try, i guess i am vegan at home and dont stress about it when out to eat. if that makes sense, but i dont call myself vegan.
 

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I'm a convenience vegan. Meaning, I eat convenience foods, I don't go places that would make it inconvenient for me to be vegan! ;P<br><br><br><br>
Okay, so I do go anywhere and suffer if I need to, and I love to cook... but I stick to it, dangit! How hard is it to stick to it? Seriously! At least vegetarian though... Every little bit DOES help, I agree... but if you believe in something, why compromise it for convenience?
 

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I almost forgot... I did once go on a blind date with an ex-veg that gave it up completely for convenience reasons. heh... He was flaky and kinda weird, though otherwise.
 

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I may have misunderstood the OP. I don't worry too much about vegans eating the mashed potatoes if they have butter in them and there really is no other suitable food available. I thought the OP was referring more to people who would eat vegan at home and then eat ice cream because it's the only dessert offered or an omlette because there was no toast and jam offered and this vegan didn't want cereal and soymilk (if it was breakfast). That's not veganism.<br><br><br><br>
To me veganism is summed up in this teaching of Ahimsa:<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">The word ahimsa is often translated as nonviolence in the West, but the principle, which literally means "non-harming," has a broader meaning. Ahimsa involves an active stance to reduce the amount of harm going on in the world with a dynamic compassion for all life and, at this point in time, the whole living planet. Ahimsa is acting from an empathetic identification born of a reverence for life that affects every facet of our existence. It involves a personal responsibility to work for the well-being of all sentient creatures. Ahimsa is a practice that strives for less and less disorder and pain in the world, as we do our best to live with increasing harmony, compassion, and Love. In this way we also decrease the vrittis (thought activity) of the mind.<br><br><br><br>
A vegan way of life (no flesh foods, eggs, dairy, leather, or other animal by-products) actively creates six aspects of ahimsa:<br><br><br><br>
(1) compassion and non-cruelty toward animals<br><br>
(2) preserving the Earth and its ecology<br><br>
(3) feeding the hungry<br><br>
(4) preserving human life<br><br>
(5) preservation of personal health<br><br>
(6) inspiring peace<br></div>
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<br><br><br><a href="http://www.creationsmagazine.com/articles/C106/Cousens.html" target="_blank">http://www.creationsmagazine.com/art...6/Cousens.html</a>
 

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I agree with Jessica...<br><br><br><br>
Even when I was still in HS... I had a really bad Senior prom experience.. my only food that night was a nekkid salad and fries at Denny's after the prom. Great date, eh? :p<br><br><br><br>
I definitely ate when I got home.
 

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I used to do something similar to that for the last year or few months I was lacto-ovo. I didn't call myself vegan.<br><br>
But I think it's good and a common stage of the transition to veganism, although I know some people can go cold turkey. For me, being (more of) an inconvenience to other people was the hardest thing to deal with when going vegan and I still struggle with it, so I have a lot of empathy for people at this stage.
 

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With my "suitable food" example I was thinking of more than just what I wrote.<br><br><br><br>
Suppose you explained that you were vegan and what that meant and you went to the house expecting to eat some vegan food as prepared by the host. The host explains how she almost put real bacon bits into the potatoes but remembered just in time. She's really proud of herself. You explained that the potatoes would have to be butter-less to be vegan and somehow you find out that there is butter in the potatoes. And in the green beans. And the carrots. And the gravy is meat-based. Now what?<br><br><br><br>
1. Say you won't eat anything and explain why. Make the host feel really shi**y even thought she did try.<br><br>
2. Look through the kitchen and find something else to eat. Hold up things and say "Does this have milk in it?" lol <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
3. Eat the potatoes and carrots and greenbeans. Skip the gravy. If someone asks you about why you're eating dairy you can explain "well, the host went through great trouble preparing me some vegan food. I appreciate the effort she went through so I'm happily eating this even though technically it isn't vegan. At home I don't eat any dairy or eggs. By the way, are you going to watch the Bears beat the Colts next week to win the Superbowl."<br><br><br><br>
Of course there are scenarios where it could be meat in the dish instead of dairy. I wouldn't eat the dish ever if it had meat in it. Nowadays I would probably just bring my own food because I know what veganism is and no matter how you explain it you can still get dairy and eggs and fish and chicken stock in your food. It would be easier just to bring my own. I just wouldn't mind too much if a vegan, in the situation I presented, ate some dairy. BUT NO ICE CREAM!!!
 

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It's a whole lot more than most people do, so I commend them for that, but as others have said, it would annoy me to hear someone like this call themselves a vegan.
 

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This was how I ate during my transition period into veganism. It does really help make the process easier to slide into..most people I go out with know I can't eat butter, or any dairy products, or anything with eggs so it's not an inconvenience issue with them......however I always feel a bit awkward asking the waiter/waitress/whoever just what's in their food. Usually I don't ask, I just take the safe route with items on the menu I KNOW would be vegan. I'm going to start asking more though because it is important to me and I should be 100% positive about the things I eat out.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElectricGreen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
This was how I ate during my transition period into veganism. It does really help make the process easier to slide into..most people I go out with know I can't eat butter, or any dairy products, or anything with eggs so it's not an inconvenience issue with them......however I always feel a bit awkward asking the waiter/waitress/whoever just what's in their food. Usually I don't ask, I just take the safe route with items on the menu I KNOW would be vegan. I'm going to start asking more though because it is important to me and I should be 100% positive about the things I eat out.</div>
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If you do it in a nice way and apologize for being a pain, wait staff usually are pretty nice about answering questions, or that's what I've found anyway. I've gotten used to it.
 

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Ive been doing this lately. We go to my in-laws for dinner every week or two and they always make lots of veggies and she'll warm up a few slices of Tofurkey (lol) so she does try. I would never ever (barf) eat animal flesh. However, if there is butter in the corn already, at their house, I will eat it. Ive only been vegan at home for about a month, so I do see this as a transitional thing. I wont eat the ice cream or pudding (wtvr) they have for dessert, and I can live without soymilk. (yay water) When I was 19 or so, I called myself a free-gan and I would eat cheese pizza etc if someone gave it to me for free. I dont do that anymore. Im not sure if this post makes any sense. *shrug*<br><br><br><br>
ETA: I dont call myself vegan yet. For reasons explained above <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Mr. Sun</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
...<br><br>
Suppose you explained that you were vegan and what that meant and you went to the house expecting to eat some vegan food as prepared by the host. The host explains how she almost put real bacon bits into the potatoes but remembered just in time. She's really proud of herself. You explained that the potatoes would have to be butter-less to be vegan and somehow you find out that there is butter in the potatoes. And in the green beans. And the carrots. And the gravy is meat-based. Now what?<br><br><br><br>
1. Say you won't eat anything and explain why. Make the host feel really shi**y even thought she did try.<br><br>
2. Look through the kitchen and find something else to eat. Hold up things and say "Does this have milk in it?" lol <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
3. Eat the potatoes and carrots and greenbeans. Skip the gravy. If someone asks you about why you're eating dairy you can explain "well, the host went through great trouble preparing me some vegan food. I appreciate the effort she went through so I'm happily eating this even though technically it isn't vegan. At home I don't eat any dairy or eggs. By the way, are you going to watch the Bears beat the Colts next week to win the Superbowl."</div>
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I've been in this situation several times... where the host honestly did *some* research and tried her best to make a vegan meal for me. And because I appreciated the effort and these people were important to me, I didn't fuss about the food, but ate it without comment.<br><br><br><br>
I think, depending on the circumstances, some lenience/patience/understanding in these types of situations can actually give people a more positive impression of veganism...
 

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A convenience "vegan" is not a vegan.<br><br><br><br>
I'm tired of hearing the word "vegan" being used to represent a diet instead of the lifestyle. I didn't word that very well, but you all probably understand what I'm trying to say.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tymps</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Is it really right to compromise your morals and values just because somethings inconvenient?</div>
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No, maybe that's other people's thing. But it's not mine.<br><br><br><br>
If someone is eating animals/animal products occasionally, it doesn't seem like they have the typical morals/values associated with the vegan lifestyle. So I don't really know how to answer this question.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElectricGreen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br>
...I always feel a bit awkward asking the waiter/waitress/whoever just what's in their food. Usually I don't ask, I just take the safe route with items on the menu I KNOW would be vegan. I'm going to start asking more though because it is important to me and I should be 100% positive about the things I eat out.</div>
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<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>eggplant</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If you do it in a nice way and apologize for being a pain, wait staff usually are pretty nice about answering questions, or that's what I've found anyway. I've gotten used to it.</div>
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They usually are. And are usually willing to correct mistakes if asked. Most businesses want their customers happy, after all.<br><br><br><br>
That said, I've been embarrassed to death several times when dinng out with fellow vegans who became loud, irate or downright rude when their food was not as they'd requested... that kind of behavior definitely supports the "hard to please" stereotype... ugh...
 
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