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I have a legitimate question, being new to this lifestyle. Where can one find all these different terms for different levels of vegetarianism? All my life I've only known Vegetarian and Vegan. I mean say I ate 100% plants and no whole grains or processed foods.. What is that? Or say I ate no meat, but I did dine on the occasional cockroach or insect..what is that? And are crustaceans considered meat? I'm only half joking here really because all the terms I see thrown around and am quite confused as to what I would call myself
 

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Lacto-ovo-vegetarian - eats milk (lacto) and eggs (ovo), no meat, fish or poultry, and no animal ingredients such as gelatine or cochineal, which comes from crushed beetles. All sea creatures are included in the 'fish' category.

Lacto-vegetarian - see above

Ovo-vegetarian - see above

Pescetarian - someone who doesn't eat meat or poultry, but does eat fish. May or may not consume dairy or eggs.

Vegan - eats no animal products - no meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk, or animal ingredients, doesn't wear or use animal skins, and also endevours to live a cruelty-free lifestyle as far as is possible or practical - so doesn't use toiletries and household cleaners that have animal ingredients or have been tested on animals.

Raw vegan - as vegan above, but sticks to raw (uncooked and unprocessed) foods.

Whatever. They are all labels. Don't get too hung up on a label. Just do your best, go where your personal ethics guides you, and resist what insults your own soul.
 

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From the Webster dictionary:
Animal-
any of a kingdom (Animalia) of living things including many-celled organisms and often many of the single-celled ones (as protozoans) that typically differ from plants in having cells without cellulose walls, in lacking chlorophyll and the capacity for photosynthesis, in requiring more complex food materials (as proteins), in being organized to a greater degree of complexity, and in having the capacity for spontaneous movement and rapid motor responses to stimulation.

Omnis eat animals. Cannibals are omnis. Pescatarians are omnis (eat sea animals). Insect eaters are omnis. Flexitarians (only sometimes eat animals) are omnis.
Eating things that incidently may contain by law so many bug parts-food is allowed to have a certain amount of bug parts without disclosure, I believe-is still vegetarian as it unavoidable. Stepping on the occasional insect would still be vegan-purposefully stepping on them would not be vegan.
Pescatarians are a subclass of omni. Vegetarians are a subclass of pescatarian. Strict vegetarian a subclass of vegetarian(lacto and or ovo). Vegan a subclass of strict veg. Like a venn (sp?) diagram.

It matters when using the wrong term starts blurring the common definition. I have no issue with people choosing to limit their meat consumption- I applaud them- but I do issue when they refer to themselves as vegetarian.
 

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In some places, vegetarianism is defined by religions because the standard definitions cannot accurately define the characteristics of vegetarianism practised by certain religions.

Hindu vegetarianism: lacto-vegetarian that exclude eggs, onion and garlic.

Jain vegetarianism: lacto-vegetarian that exclude eggs, onion, garlic, honey and root vegetables like potatoes and carrot. However, many Jain scholars and monks strongly support and advocate the idea of veganism because of the abuse and violence involved in the harvesting of milk from cows. Thus, there're Jain veganism that exclude onion, garlic and root vegetables.

Buddhist vegetarianism: lacto-vegetarian that exclude onion and garlic. Some sects exclude eggs. Sadly, many Buddhist vegetarians consume bird's nest soup; a product that is cruelly taken from birds that build its nest by painstakingly vomiting and some even vomits blood
 

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^ Good points. In addition:

Rastafarian vegetarianism: Many rastafarians are vegetarian for religious reasons. The ital or I-tal (pronounced "eye'-tall") diet is largely vegetarian, though some eat fish. Some are vegans. They believe food should be natural, pure and from the earth, and therefore they may avoid artificial additives and food with chemically modified ingredients.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ital#Vegetarianism
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmio View Post

I mean say I ate 100% plants and no whole grains or processed foods.. What is that? Or say I ate no meat, but I did dine on the occasional cockroach or insect..what is that? And are crustaceans considered meat?
I think you need to accept the fact that not every diet or lifestyle has its own label.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElaineV View Post

I think you need to accept the fact that not every diet or lifestyle has its own label.
Hey, if we can add beegan to the VB dictionary, then why not invent a new word for every other VB member, too?


--Fromper
 

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Beegan....I don't know what it is about that name, but it always makes me Attachment 16708
LL
 
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