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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys...

Just wondering if you can tell me...

I follow all the Vegan values but I still eat a bit of vegetarian cheese and drink milk and eat eggs sometimes..(Only purchace free range from local farms i know treat them well)....

So what do I call myself...

When out to dinnner I basically say Im vegan so I dont have the cheese they use or cream that would have gelatin in it...

I have been vegetarian for 1 year then the start of this year I found out all the proper ingredients of things..

Lacto octo vegetarian still doest follow all the Vegan values so thats why Im confused...??

Sorry to sound silly but just want to know...

Thanks heaps...
 

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sounds like you're a vegetarian.

if you agree with vegan values, why not just go vegan? (maybe you are in transition, but it wasn't clear to me from what you wrote). because you can "agree" with vegan values, but as long as you are purchasing (even "free-range" or organic) eggs & dairy, you are funding animal slaughter same as you would be by purchasing meat. there's no difference. and veganism is about boycotting animal exploitation. so as long as you're paying for it, you're definitely not following vegan values. not to be rude or anything, but i'd say until you make those changes and eliminate the eggs and dairy products, you can call yourself a vegetarian...or a hypocrite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay but I mean that I buy all products that are crulty free.. No animal derived ingredients.. No leather or silk and all that stuff..

So isnt theer another name to it..?
 

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I know what you mean. I'm trying to transition. I buy all cruelty free vegan cleaning products and self care products, the food I eat is mostly vegan but occasionally I'll have a quiche (my box of eggs says the hens have outdoor access at all times and nest in boxes in barns but you never know for sure!) with free range eggs and I have evaporated milk in my morning coffee. I also have the odd yoghurt but I don't buy any clothing or anything made from leather or wool, so mostly my values are vegan. I tend to say I'm a strict vegetarian if it's neccessary to clarify to someone. If it's a restaurant and I don't want dairy etc I'll tell them I want a vegan meal but won't actually call myself vegan. There isn't a name for us except vegetarian however.
 

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Does an octo vegetarian eat calamari?


I would just go with vegetarian. I have pretty much the same lifestyle, mostly vegan, but minimally lacto-ovo on occasion. I call myself a vegetarian or schmegan, if I'm feeling smart-alecky.

Also, while you may avoid animal tested products, leather, silk, etc. if you still eat dairy and eggs you aren't really following vegan values. It's one thing to believe in a set of values, but another to adhere to them.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGIHEAD View Post

I follow all the Vegan values but I still eat a bit of vegetarian cheese and drink milk and eat eggs sometimes..(Only purchace free range from local farms i know treat them well)....
On the free range chicken farms they still get their hens from suppliers who kill all the male chicks.

They still kill the hens who they don't feel are producing enough (unless it's some rare kind of "sanctuary").

On the dairy farms, calves are still removed from their mothers within hours or days of birth.

There's a good chance that male calves are turned into veal, or are slaughtered young for cheap meat.

The mother cows are forcibly impregnated every year, are "spent" long before their natural life-cycle, and sent to slaughter like any other commercial cow.

I question the phrase "treated well" when you look at the life-cycle. The animals are still commodities - these aren't loved family pets but money-making machines whose interests come secondary to keeping the business going - and if you have vegan values, this shouldn't be acceptable.

If you need help and ideas transitioning, people will be happy to help
 

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Ovo-Lacto Vegetarian: same as VEGAN (see right), but also eats eggs and milk products. This is the most 'popular' form of Vegetarianism in many Western countries..



Vegan:
excludes animal flesh (meat, poultry, fish and seafood), animal products (eggs and dairy), and usually excludes honey and the wearing and use of animal products (leather, silk, wool, lanolin, gelatin...).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absolut View Post

Ovo-Lacto Vegetarian: same as VEGAN (see right), but also eats eggs and milk products. This is the most 'popular' form of Vegetarianism in many Western countries..



Vegan:
excludes animal flesh (meat, poultry, fish and seafood), animal products (eggs and dairy), and usually excludes honey and the wearing and use of animal products (leather, silk, wool, lanolin, gelatin...).
Agreed.
 

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(I stole that off a website.. should have put that..)

But yeah definitions are definitions. You can't bend the boundaries.

You either are or you aren't. There isn't a half way.

(this just goes for veg*nism, other things are completely different)

And I dont mean this in a vegnazi way.

I'm lactoovovegetarian. I'm just saying.. you've got to call yourself what you are, or else it will confuse people.

For example, like "vegetarians" that eat chicken and fish.

We all know that they aren't a vegetarian.

But the general population seems to think that's what a vegetarian is, based upon meeting people who do that!
 

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I think it's societies views on vegetarianism that are the problem. Vegetarians these days are thought to still think that wearing leather and using regular makeup and cleaning products etc is okay where as in reality we don't think it's okay and that is where the confusion about what to call yourself can come in
 

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Vegihead,

Sounds like you are an ovo-lacto vegetarian, who is vegetarian for ethical reasons, as opposed to health reasons. People go vegetarian for either reason, or for both reasons. Doesn't matter which. You are still a vegetarian.

There are many people in India who follow the doctrine of ahimsa (non-injury) as part of their spiritual beliefs, and they are lacto-vegetarian for ethical reasons. Having ethical beliefs about how animals should be treated does not make you vegan. You can be an ethical vegetarian.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absolut View Post

But yeah definitions are definitions. You can't bend the boundaries.

You either are or you aren't. There isn't a half way.

(this just goes for veg*nism, other things are completely different)
Just to add to this though, it's really only definition-wise that there's no half way.


Just because somebody isn't willing to be all-vegan doesn't mean they should have dairy and eggs at every meal. Of course, I think everyone should be vegan... but I wouldn't want someone to feel that because they're not quite there, they should just give up.

It's not all or nothing in practise, but just when it comes to definitions it's pretty clear.
There's nothing remotely vegan about cow's milk or hen's eggs.
 

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I used to do exactly that with dairy. I'd be vegan at home, but would eat dairy when I went out because I found it so difficult to find some place that won't put dairy on foods. I was simply a vegetarian who was in transition of becoming vegan. However I wanted to be a vegan and to be able to say I was a "vegan." But I did still call myself a vegetarian at that time.
 

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You seem to be assuming that only vegans care about animal welfare and cruelty issues. Many non-vegan vegetarians care about these things too. You are one of them.

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absolut View Post

Ovo-Lacto Vegetarian: same as VEGAN (see right), but also eats eggs and milk products. This is the most 'popular' form of Vegetarianism in many Western countries..



Vegan:
excludes animal flesh (meat, poultry, fish and seafood), animal products (eggs and dairy), and usually excludes honey and the wearing and use of animal products (leather, silk, wool, lanolin, gelatin...).
I don't totally agree with that. It implies that L/O vegetarians do not use/wear any animal products, and I think a lot of vegetarians haven't gotten to that point. JMO.

To the OP - I totally understand where you're coming from. It can be more difficult sometimes to get totally vegan food than to just accept a small amount of dairy/egg in something. I like the term near vegan, which I think I read in "Becoming Vegetarian". But otherwise, there's not any classificiation. If you eat any egg/dairy, you're not vegan. As others have mentioned, lots of vegetarians are vegetarian for ethical reasons - though the vegans would remind them (and you) that you're not following through if that's the case.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by meatless View Post

Just to add to this though, it's really only definition-wise that there's no half way.


Just because somebody isn't willing to be all-vegan doesn't mean they should have dairy and eggs at every meal. Of course, I think everyone should be vegan... but I wouldn't want someone to feel that because they're not quite there, they should just give up.

It's not all or nothing in practise, but just when it comes to definitions it's pretty clear.
There's nothing remotely vegan about cow's milk or hen's eggs.
everything meatless said
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGIHEAD View Post

Hi guys...

Just wondering if you can tell me...

I follow all the Vegan values but I still eat a bit of vegetarian cheese and drink milk and eat eggs sometimes..(Only purchace free range from local farms i know treat them well)....
Don't kid yourself! All animals are trated badly, no matter what they say on the egg boxes, or milk boxes, because humans are forcing them to produce products at an unnatural rate!

So, you're a vegetarian, if you would like to be vegan, it's up to you, but make sure you know what that involves!

Good luck!
 
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