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I'm confused about what bread I can eat. So far I've just been eating some 100% whole wheat stuff that I found at the grocery store. I've also been eating wheat pitas and wraps. In the ingredients it says that they have essential wheat gluten in them. I've heard a lot of talk about gluten free this and gluten free that amongst vegans. What is gluten and why can't I eat it. What kind of bread do vegans eat?
 

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There's nothing unvegan about wheat gluten (it's just wheat protein). It's what seitan is made from. Gluten intolerance is fairly common, though, and that's why there's so much talk of gluten-free stuff.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>BeckySue</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm confused about what bread I can eat. So far I've just been eating some 100% whole wheat stuff that I found at the grocery store. I've also been eating wheat pitas and wraps. In the ingredients it says that they have essential wheat gluten in them. I've heard a lot of talk about gluten free this and gluten free that amongst vegans. What is gluten and why can't I eat it. What kind of bread do vegans eat?</div>
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You can eat all the gluten you wish unless you suffer from Coeliac disease.(also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy or coeliac sprue) it is a condition of the small intestine.<br><br>
Tings to avoid when buying bread of course are: honey, eggs whey, ect. of course. But also word like "dough conditioners can contain animal products. The only way to know is to write the manufacturer, or just avoid it.<br><br><br><br>
Some quotes from the internet.<br><br><br><br>
Commercially produced breads that most supermarkets carry frequently contain dough conditioners, colorants, chemicals, or preservatives. Although many of these items may be vegan, they are unnecessary additives that health-conscious consumers generally avoid.<br><br>
Most pita breads, plain bagels, chapatis, and corn tortillas are vegan, but always check the ingredients to be sure. Flour tortillas are often vegan, but some brands contain lard, which is an animal fat. Some brands of crackers may also contain lard, butter, milk derivatives, or cheese. Many commercially produced baked goods, including breads and crackers, contain cottonseed oil or hydrogenated fats, which are vegan but not very healthful.<br><br><br><br>
Finding vegan bread is not difficult. In fact, bread, in all its forms, is one of the more readily available vegan foods. The secret is to look closely at ingredient labels, ask questions, and seek out the highest quality product made with comprehendible ingredients.<br><br><br><br>
One list to try to study to be more aware is ingrdiants is<br><br><a href="http://www.happycow.net/health-animal-ingredients.html" target="_blank">http://www.happycow.net/health-animal-ingredients.html</a>
 

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I generally like to avoid the bread in grocery stores in the bakery area. You should make your way to the frozen section and find the preservative free breads that are stored in the freezers! They are very much delicious and the breads I get from there are vegan <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Here's my fav: <a href="http://www.mybloodsugar.net/foodforlife.htm" target="_blank">Ezekiel 4:9</a>
 

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A lot of people confuse "vegan" and gluten-free. A lot of people are either gluten intolerant or allergic. I would guess most of them are not vegan. Gluten is just fine and is in almost all wheat breads. It is what gives them their chewy structure. Gluten also composes many of my favorite meat substitutes.
 

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I use the Lite Wheat at my grocery store. I think it's vegan (I read the ingredients and so far I don't see anything weird) It's also only 1.65. YAY!
 

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If in doubt, make your own! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Classic Sandwich Bread<br><br><br><br>
2 1/4 teaspoons dry active yeast (1 envelope)<br><br>
1/2 teaspoon sugar<br><br>
1 cup warm milk (soy, rice, whatever you prefer)<br><br>
1 Tablespoon honey (or molasses, or maple syrup)<br><br>
1/4 cup vegetable oil<br><br>
2 1/2 teaspoon salt<br><br>
2 cups Whole Wheat flour (or all purpose)<br><br>
3-4 cups bread flour (near specialty flours)<br><br><br><br><br><br>
* In a small bowl, stir 1/2 cup warm water and the yeast together (add water to yeast, for easiest mixing), and set aside until foamy, about 10 minutes. (if it does not foam, your yeast is no longer good, and you need more) In a larger bowl, combine the milk, 1 cup warm water, the honey, oil, and salt, then stir in the proofed yeast. Using a wooden spoon (or the paddle accessory of an electric mixer) work in the flour one cup at a time until you have a shaggy, heavy dough, that leaves the sides of the bowl.<br><br>
* Turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and gradually knewad in the remaining flour until the dough is smooth and resiliant (you poke it, it returns to shape quickly), about 5 minutes.<br><br>
* Put dough in deep oiled bowl, turning it so that the top is oiled too. cover with a damp towel and set in a warm place to rise until doubled in bulk (and hour or longer)<br><br>
* Deflate the dough by pressing down on it, then divide it into two equal pieces (or cut into rolls), shape into balls, cover, and let rest for 10 minutes. meanwhile, oil two bread pans. Flatten the dough into two rectangles the length of the pan. Roll it up tightly, pinsh the seams together to esal the ends, adn place in the pans, seam-side down. Cover again and let rise until the dough is just above the edge of the pan, about 35 minutes.<br><br>
* Preheat the oven to 375*F. Leave the dough as is or score the top with three diagonal slashes (use a steak knife). Brush with water and sprinkle on any toppings (sesame seeds, etc). Bake until browned and pulilng away from the sides, 40-45 minutes. If the tops get too dark, loosely cover with foil.<br><br>
* Turn the bread out, tap the bottom to make sure it has a hollow sound, not a thud, then set on a rack to cool.
 
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