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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have tried and tried to make stuff like bbq tofu, soy-lemon tofu, etc by roasting it, but I can't ever get it chewy unless I roast/broil the CRAP out of it, almost burning it.<br>
Im really am a good cook, but I think I am tofu challenged. Please. Help.<br><br><br>
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElaineV</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026053"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Try freezing it first and then cooking it. That helps add a chewy texture.</div>
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It does, it does ..<br><br>
If you make your own tofu then using extra coagulant can also turn it into rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeee. I haven't dared trying to make my own tofu...im not nearly industrious enough for such endeavors. Lol. And rubbery doesn't sound nearly as appetizing as chewy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> thanks for the advice though!<br><br>
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElaineV</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026053"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Try freezing it first and then cooking it. That helps add a chewy texture.</div>
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Gonna get a couple packs and try this.<br><br>
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You are of course pressing it, right? Sorry if that's a dumb questions. I just thought I'd make sure.
 

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Have you tried frying tofu in a pan on the stove (not deep-frying)? This is how I make it, and it's pretty hard to go wrong. Here are some instructions:<br><br>
1. Press as much moisture as you can out of the block of tofu.<br>
2. Slice the tofu. Thin slabs works best for me, as it is easier to get more of the surface area brown and it cooks more nicely.<br>
3. Marinate the tofu if you wish. Teriyaki sauce is a good marinade, but I've also used various things, like Italian salad dressing.<br>
4. Heat oil in a pan and put all of your tofu slabs in the pan.<br>
5. Add spices if you're into that.<br>
6. Once the bottom of the tofu gets nice and brown, flip the slabs over.<br>
7. Once the tofu is all fried and brown, it's easier to mix it in with vegetables and sauces, without it breaking apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, I like the last recommendation a lot and i will try tomorrow! As far as pressing, I have trouble not crushing the tofu into an unslicable state when I press. It will stay as a rectangle, but the inside splits apart so when I slice it into pieces, the slabs are crumbly and fragile. Am I impatient? What?<br><br>
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jentlytread</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026187"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Ok, I like the last recommendation a lot and i will try tomorrow! As far as pressing, I have trouble not crushing the tofu into an unslicable state when I press. It will stay as a rectangle, but the inside splits apart so when I slice it into pieces, the slabs are crumbly and fragile. Am I impatient? What?<br><br>
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I don't have that problem. <a href="http://toomanycombined.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-to-press-tofu-in-five-easy-steps.html" target="_blank">Here</a> are some instructions that may help. I wrap my tofu in a paper towel and usually a dishtowel to collect the moisture while it's being pressed. I also used to press my tofu for 1 or 2 hours, but apparently many people only do it for 15-30 minutes. I'm not sure how much of a difference (if any) the time makes. I don't eat tofu very often.
 

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I cook mine the same as Dormouse except I use a dry pan on low heat for about thirty minutes. It gets all the moisture out which makes it nice and chewy, and also browns the tofu at the same time. Then I throw it into the stirfry oil so it gets nice and crispy and greasy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> I freeze all my tofu as soon as I get it home from the store, and that helps as well, in addition to keeping it fresher longer because I usually buy a bunch at one time when it's on sale. No matter how you cook tofu though, it does take time to learn so keep at it. I don't think I got it 'right' until I'd experimented with it a half a dozen times or so. Good luck!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Clueless Git</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026057"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
It does, it does ..<br><br>
If you make your own tofu then using extra coagulant can also turn it into rubber.</div>
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Really? What do you use? I've only used magnesium sulfate and find that if I overdo it it just tastes like magnesium sulfate, and a little drier.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Digger</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026354"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I cook mine the same as Dormouse except I use a dry pan on low heat for about thirty minutes. It gets all the moisture out which makes it nice and chewy, and also browns the tofu at the same time. Then I throw it into the stirfry oil so it gets nice and crispy and greasy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> I freeze all my tofu as soon as I get it home from the store, and that helps as well, in addition to keeping it fresher longer because I usually buy a bunch at one time when it's on sale. No matter how you cook tofu though, it does take time to learn so keep at it. I don't think I got it 'right' until I'd experimented with it a half a dozen times or so. Good luck!</div>
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-took me half a dozen years...
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>paperhanger</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026398"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
-took me half a dozen years...</div>
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Wha' happen?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Digger</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026399"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Wha' happen?</div>
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I don't know. Too ambitious. Bad tofu. Afraid to crank up the heat. Afraid of too much oil. Always trying to take shortcuts. Now, I'm the frickin' tofu master and I and my family would just as soon eat it plain, but that's prolly because the quality of tofu available in the US has improved so much over the last 30 years.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>paperhanger</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026402"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't know. Too ambitious. Bad tofu. Afraid to crank up the heat. Afraid of too much oil. Always trying to take shortcuts. Now, I'm the frickin' tofu master and I and my family would just as soon eat it plain, but that's prolly because the quality of tofu available in the US has improved so much over the last 30 years.</div>
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What brands do you like? I get mine from a korean market, and it has no English on the package, so I don't know the actual name. A Korean friend of mine showed me, and it is better than the supermarket brands, and cheaper. I love scrambled tofu so much. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>LedBoots</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3026920"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What brands do you like? I get mine from a korean market, and it has no English on the package, so I don't know the actual name. A Korean friend of mine showed me, and it is better than the supermarket brands, and cheaper. I love scrambled tofu so much. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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The Asian markets around me sell fresh tofu (made in San Diego, nearby) It's wonderful but not packaged terribly well so I'm afraid to not cook it. I usually buy Trader Joe's tofu: the firm, silken, and their hard "high protein" type, depending on what I am doing with it. I make it from time to time, but it takes a lot of time and makes a big mess. The results though, just made tofu, are indescribable.
 

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<p>i am glad you mentioned it because i never knew you were supposed to press tofu. you just gave me hope. im freezing and unfreezing my tofu now so that i can try and cook it :)<br>
 </p>
 
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