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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
"Have you been formally tested for learning disabilities?"<br><br><br><br>
Yes I think so. I'm not sure.<br><br><br><br>
I don't really think of what I have as a disability, just as a noticable difference. For example if I want to learn a dance step, or a swimming stroke, or to properly hold and fire a rifle, I have to break it down into its smallest positions and movements, make notes, make drawings, then slowly build them all together into a unitized position or movement. I've noticed that other people can learn the same thing by looking and copying. However once I've learned the basic swimming whole-stroke, I seem to more rapidly find how to maximize its efficiency, than other people learn this; they often seem to need people observing them and coaching them to tweak their movements. I however, just do the stroke, and while I am doing it I notice that if I keep my elbow a bit up, or a bit down, or my hands at one angle or another, or lift my head a bit earlier, or a bit later, I can get more speed and distance with less effort. So to go from not knowing how to do the stroke, to doing it approximately right, it takes me about 45 minutes, then another hour to go from there to doing it smoothly and efficiently. While someone else will be able to approximate the stroke after about 2 minutes, but take another 2 hours before they can do it smoothly and efficiently.<br><br><br><br>
My son once got real angry at me when showing me how to do some kind of kneeling stance with a rifle. He kept on saying "just do this" and showed me the position for about 5 seconds. Here, here's the gun, you do it. Wrong. I was doing it wrong. I needed to very slowly put together exaclty where the arm was, exactly where the leg was, exactly where the other arm was, how was the leg in relation to the arm, how was it in relation to the other leg. He said that everyone else, he just showed them once, then stood up, then after a period of a few seconds, they did it themselves. He thought I was being obtuse, about not being able to get into the correct position. He thought I was pretending not to be able to do it, just to get on his nerves. But I really just couldn't do it. But he really didn't believe me. He got really angry because I "refused" to copy him correctly. When in fact I was entirely unable, without having him maintain the pose for about 20 minutes, while I move each of my limbs into the same position.<br><br><br><br>
I remember the same thing with dancing. However once I get the whole thing, I very rapidly learn how to give it nuance and charactor. Same thing with playing a musical instrument.<br><br><br><br>
The very REASON I am so good at articulating things, is I spent a great deal of time learning the thing to begin with. Once I learn the swimming stroke, I can describe it to someone in <b>words</b> while most people can't do that at all, and depend on their ability to <b>show</b> people the stroke, in order to communicate it.. A picture is not worth a thousand words to me. To learn something, I need a thousand little pictures, or 1000 words. This doesn't seem to show up on any kind of IQ test. None of these are tests of <b>how</b> you learned; they are all tests of <b>what</b>you have learned, in addition to your ability to deduce -- which I do perfectly normally.<br><br><br><br>
I also can't remember a phone number, not even for a few seconds. The only way I can remember it more than a second or so is to continuously sing it in my head, over and over, the whole time. If I stop singing for a minute, I will forget it. I can only remember 3 digits. If I read 3 digits from a page, then turn in the direction of the telephone keypad -- I can dial the 3 digits. If I read 7 digits, I can't. I need to dial 3 digits, then turn back to the page, then look at 3 more digits, then dial those 3, then go back and look at the last digit, then dial it. However if you read me a long string of digits, say 15 or 16 digits, I can say them right back to you -- as long as I don't pause at all, between the time you stop speaking and the time I start speaking. The psychologist that tested me at this remarked that no-one else had ever remembered anywhere near such long strings of numbers, or spoke them back so fast. The only problem is, if I speak them back slowly, I can't do it. I had to speak them back as fast as was humanly possible. I actually was not remembering them consciously. I was more like automatically playing back a sound-recording of the numbers.<br><br><br><br>
When adding a column of numbers using the carry method, I have to <b>write</b> down the carry number. If I don't, I will forget it, if interrupted for even a moment. Once I see or hear another number, the carry number would disappear from my memory. Most people are able to remember the carry number, there are only 10 numbers that it could be.<br><br><br><br>
I absolutely love electronic spread sheets because I don't have to remember numbers. I create variables with long names, then plug the numbers in the variable. That is why I hate programming languages that use very short symbols to represent functions. I just can't remember what the symbols mean. I also don't see the point, since remembering things for you, instead of forcing you to use your own memory, is EXACTLY what we have computers for. So why name a variable t, for time, when you can name it time? Why say d/t=v when you can say distance/time = velocity? I'll forget what the t stands for, if you name it t. The only short things I can remember, are unique things, like a single symbol for PI makes more sense to me than writing out PI, or writing out 3.14. And yes, I can only remember the value to 3 places. Why remember more places, anyway, if you can alway just say "pi."<br><br><br><br>
So I can't stand using C, but I love using BASIC. I find assembly language easier to learn, than C.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Oh, yea, if I seel a sequence of numbers more than 4 or 5 numbers across, I can't tell you what the number is. I can't read off the sequences of digits, to you. I lose my place. this is no big deal if the numbers are on paper -- I simply mark up long numbers by putting commas between every 3 digits. then I can easily read off 3 digits at a time. But if the numbers are on a computer screen, I can't read them off. I have to copy and paste -- paste the numbers somewhere else; then i put spaces between every 3 numbers, then I can tell you what the number is. More than 4 or 5 numbers -- they all run together into one unitized thing. It makes certain tasks just take a hair longer.<br><br><br><br>
I have no problem reading of the letters in actual words to you. That is because I recognize the words as a whole, a whole word, plus I know how the word is spelled, so I can read the letters off to you from my <b>knowledge</b> of how it is spelled (as opposed to reading them from the actual letters on the page) -- however that is the same thing -- so there is no problem there. But a random sequence of letters -- I have the same problem as with numbers, only it it not quite as bad because I can see them "naturally" grouping up into recognizable groups. So I could read off etynhytuio -- I see et, then yn, then hy, then tuio. When I read yn, I haven't yet forgotten et, so I can go on to hy without losing my place. But 5646895356 -- I can't even tell you how many digits there are -- without putting in commas or spaces or whatever, to break them up into more assimilable groups. By time I get to the 8 or 9, I have forgotten how many digits along I am and if I try to read the next digit, I may tend to skip one or go back one or 2. Now if I <b>hear</b> the numbers, I can recite them back as I explained above. But if I try to read them off from the page I lose my place.
 

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It sounds like you very well might have an "official" learning disability, but you'd have to be tested by a trained professional to find out. I suggest inquiring who is in charge of disabled student resources on campus and set up an appointment for testing. If they do find that you have a learning disability they can then determine what kinds of accomodations will help you to succeed in your classes. Once it's official, by law your instructors and the college will have to provide those accomodations.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
So why name a variable t, for time, when you can name it time? Why say d/t=v when you can say distance/time = velocity? I'll forget what the t stands for, if you name it t.<br></div>
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Well, if you are not using a computer to calculate velocity it's simply easier to write v. In my physics class we don't use computers and have to write and write and write with a time limit. It simply saves time. It gets sticky because some abbreviations (like v) can mean different things depending on what you are doing...like when considering electricity v means voltage (in my books at least).<br><br><br><br>
eta: as eggplant said you should get yourself tested, maybe you could learn some memory tricks.<br><br><br><br>
btw eggplant, you are always so helpful to vb members.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>gaya</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
btw eggplant, you are always so helpful to vb members.</div>
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Hey, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
" It gets sticky because some abbreviations (like v) can mean different things depending on what you are doing."<br><br><br><br>
Ezzactly.<br><br><br><br>
When I first started learning elementry algebra, i was taught that simply writing a formula, without including a statement of what the variables stood for, would get us points off on a test. We had to say "given v=velocity, t=time, and d=distance, v=d/t. Or given v=voltage, I= current and Z equals complex impedence, v=IZ. Of course, sometimes E was used for voltage (E standing for "electromotive force" or "electrical potential") So you needed to declare your variables or nothing would make sense.<br><br><br><br>
I don't mind using single letters when doing calcuations with pencil and paper. Yea, it saves time. but I always declare my variable at least once, in a conspicuous place where I can find them, in case I need to look up what a letter stands for. But this doesn't explain why sometimes single letters are used for computer-program variables. The advantage of having a computer is that the computer can do the time-saving things for you, freeing you to do the deeper thinking. So why spend time memorizing that E stands for electromotive force, or trying to find the declatiron if you have forgotten it, when you can have the computer say show you the word or similar word (such as emf), each time it needs to be said?<br><br><br><br>
If I am working with pencia and paper I use E=IZ. If I am working with a computer spread sheet or a computer program, I will use something like emf=current*impedence. I assume "impedence" to mean complex impedence. If I want to indicate capacitive reactance i will write capreactnc or something like that. You don't want to make them too long. Then you could lose track of the fact that they are variables and start to think you are reading novels. to make things easy, I won't make one variable capreactnce, and another inductreactnc. I will try and keep the 2 similar looking and similar in length. This makes these 2 easier to display since they are so often found together. So I will do either capreactnc and indreactnce, or capac-rctnc and induc-rctnc.<br><br><br><br>
Yes I don't like to use A1, A2, B2 on spreadsheets. I like to give the cells names.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
For 35 years I had assumed that my thing where I needed to put commas between every 3 numerals, before I could read off a number, to be normal. After all, why would this be a convention when writing numbers, if it wasn't hard for <b>everone</b> to read off numbers that weren't demarcated this way? The fact that I could actually read 4 numerals, instead of 3, I took as evidence me being slightly more capable in this area, than the average person whom I believe could only read 3. That's right, if I see 100 I can tell you it is one hundred. If I see 1000 I can tell you it is 1000. I figured most people couldn't. I knew I certainly couldn't tell you what 10000 was. All I knew was that it was either 100,000 or 10,000. I couldn't tell you which, unless I demarcated it.<br><br><br><br>
However one day while working in the accounting department of a company as a bookkeeper, someone asked me to look at a cell on a spread sheet, and read off the 10-digit number that was there, with closely spaced numerals and no demarcations between them. I couldn't do it. I'd known for 30 years that I couldn't do it, but I thought neither could anyone else. He refused to believe me. He thought I was just trying to be difficult. Then I asked him to read off the number, and I saw that he was able to (I added commas, and checked to see if he was right).
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
" It gets sticky because some abbreviations (like v) can mean different things depending on what you are doing."<br><br><br><br>
Ezzactly.<br><br><br><br>
When I first started learning elementry algebra, i was taught that simply writing a formula, without including a statement of what the variables stood for, would get us points off on a test. We had to say "given v=velocity, t=time, and d=distance, v=d/t. Or given v=voltage, I= current and Z equals complex impedence, v=IZ. Of course, sometimes E was used for voltage (E standing for "electromotive force" or "electrical potential") So you needed to declare your variables or nothing would make sense.</div>
</div>
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Recently in a lab the lab prof took points off my quiz for not writing out the formulas. I was pissed. It was a very simple question and you can obviously infer the formula from what work I did write down but he nailed me. The question was about getting the acceleration from an electric charge or something. The formulas were only E(electric field) = F(force)/q(charge) with E and q given and then determining the acceleration with the mass given and the force from the previous equation. It only has two frigging parts and I lost 30% from my grade because I didn't write the letters out (only half the numbers). I've never had to do that before. Sorry, I'm just complaining.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
For 35 years I had assumed that my thing where I needed to put commas between every 3 numerals, before I could read off a number, to be normal. After all, why would this be a convention when writing numbers, if it wasn't hard for <b>everone</b> to read off numbers that weren't demarcated this way? The fact that I could actually read 4 numerals, instead of 3, I took as evidence me being slightly more capable in this area, than the average person whom I believe could only read 3. That's right, if I see 100 I can tell you it is one hundred. If I see 1000 I can tell you it is 1000. I figured most people couldn't. I knew I certainly couldn't tell you what 10000 was. All I knew was that it was either 100,000 or 10,000. I couldn't tell you which, unless I demarcated it.<br><br><br><br>
However one day while working in the accounting department of a company as a bookkeeper, someone asked me to look at a cell on a spread sheet, and read off the 10-digit number that was there, with closely spaced numerals and no demarcations between them. I couldn't do it. I'd known for 30 years that I couldn't do it, but I thought neither could anyone else. He refused to believe me. He thought I was just trying to be difficult. Then I asked him to read off the number, and I saw that he was able to (I added commas, and checked to see if he was right).</div>
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Well, you are right that people do tend to remember numbers in segments of 3's but we don't need to put physical comma's between the groupings. I just visualize it I guess. I focuss on the first three and then the next three and then the next, kind of like mental commas.
 

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I have chronic pain and I'm in school. I'll graduate in May, if I pass these courses, one of which is VERY difficult. I also have a 3 year old and I'm 8 months pregnant.<br><br><br><br>
I carry 12 units during the year and 6 in summer. I did drop to 9 units for one semester because my family and I were having trouble dealing with my course load.<br><br><br><br>
My pain is not terribly severe. I have chronic arthritic pain in my knees and feet. My knee pain began when I was 13, I had surgery at 19, less than one year in recovery. I attended school ft the entire time, only missed one week of school for my intial injury and one day of class for each surgery (one for each knee). I was a competetive swimmer, swimming instructor, lifeguard, etc. for 6 years, 1/2 a season off for surgeries. My pain was very bad during the last 3 years.<br><br><br><br>
I had no knee pain for 2.5 years, but at the beginning of this time, I joined the military, and immediately chronic foot pain began. It too was severe, and poorly controlled. When the knee pain came back, it was just as bad as it had been before surgery. I did find a drug that works well and relieves most of my pain. I have also restricted my activities to help control the pain.<br><br><br><br>
I'm fortunate that my pain is almost non existant while pregnant and breastfeeding. I was nursing my son when I started back to school, but he weaned soon after. When the pain came back, I started seeing the campus doctor, who prescribed my drug of choice and helped me get an elevator pass. This semester I had 2 of my classes moved downstairs in a building without an elevator. Everyone has been accomodating, though ppl often look at me funny when I tell them I'm disabled, or they see me riding the elevator. It doesn't show (don't need a wheelchair most of the time, and can't afford one, hate wearing my knee braces, so rarely do).<br><br><br><br>
The drugs I take do not effect my mental state. I take an arthritis drug, not narcotics. I don't think I could do well if I were on narcotics. My pain has not often been so severe as to be distracting. Most of the time I'm able to keep my feet up while sitting in class, which helps relieve the pressure on my knees. I don't have to climb the stairs anymore, which has helped trememndously. I wish I had asked for help sooner. I have maintained a 3.75 GPA since starting back to school.<br><br><br><br>
So yes, it can be done. It is possible. Of course, I am one person, your resluts may vary.<br><br><br><br>
My advice:<br><br><br><br>
Get ALL the help you can before you begin. I waited till it was unbearable before asking for help. It's not smart. Go to your campus office for students with disabilities and find out everything they can do for you. They will have educational assesments, educational rehab, counselling, and other accomodations available to you. Tap ALL of them.<br><br><br><br>
If you feel hesitant to take a full load ( and it sounds like you are), start with just one or 2 classes. If you don't have to go full time, and you aren't in a hurry, then you have nothing to lose. If you take one class next semester and find it challenging, take one class next semester. If it's easier than you think, take 2. My first semester I had 5. It was too much, so I've never done that again. It isn't all or nothing.<br><br><br><br>
good luck! If you are motivated, confident and use your resources, I'm sure you will do well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
" I focuss on the first three and then the next three and then the next, kind of like mental commas."<br><br><br><br>
Interesting. I just don't seem to be able to do that. Even while continuously staring at a long series of digits, and not looking away at what I am writing, I cant read off 3 digits, then 3 more digits, then 3 more. I slip "off track." I read off 3 digits, then 3 more, then I can't see where the next 3 start. I'll fall back a digit, or 2, or slip ahead one -- I can't be sure if I am at digit 7, or I have slipped back to 5 or 6, or 8 or 9.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
"I take an arthritis drug, not narcotics"<br><br><br><br>
I took NSAID's for many years for facial pain. I can't take them any longer because they engendered stomach ulcers. If I were to take any more I could get a bleed and die.<br><br><br><br>
"My pain has not often been so severe as to be distracting."<br><br><br><br>
Mine is often severe enough to be distracting.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
" I focuss on the first three and then the next three and then the next, kind of like mental commas."<br><br><br><br>
Interesting. I just don't seem to be able to do that. Even while continuously staring at a long series of digits, and not looking away at what I am writing, I cant read off 3 digits, then 3 more digits, then 3 more. I slip "off track." I read off 3 digits, then 3 more, then I can't see where the next 3 start. I'll fall back a digit, or 2, or slip ahead one -- I can't be sure if I am at digit 7, or I have slipped back to 5 or 6, or 8 or 9.</div>
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Well, first off, if you're reading numbers on a computer screen or a printed out spread sheet where the numbers are pretty small it may be more difficult than reading them off a chalk board. Today in class I thought of you and made sure I was able to read and remember the numbers as I stated and I was able to easily.<br><br>
Now on a computer screen...<br><br>
38205820495820<br><br><br><br>
yes, I am able to read them and remember them or at least find my place in the middle of sequence without a problem. When I look at the list of numbers I don't see 3.8.2.0.5.8.2.0 etc. I see 3820 5820 4958 20 - thirty-eight-twenty... fifty-eight-twenty...forty-nine fifity-eight...twenty. If I were to look at the numbers individually I would lose my place or get confused. They are in groups and I treat the groups as individuals. Therefore, there are only 4 individuals I need to remember separately, if that makes any sense. It's hard to describe mental processes.<br><br><br><br>
eta: also, as I'm reading the groups of numbers I am sounding them out in my mind. So, not only am I reading it but I am hearing it also if that makes any difference. I am not hearing three, eight, two, zero etc. I am hearing thirty eight twenty.<br><br><br><br>
etaa: So...thirty eight twenty is one number. It's not one interger but it is one number. Again, I only have to memorize 4 numbers which are the original groups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
OK gaya. i see what you are doing. And I can sort of do that with the number you supplied above -- but I think it is only because of the fact that 20 is repeated twice. All I can remember now, without looking back, about 30 seconds after looking at the number, is forty-eight-twenty, thirty-eight twenty, something, something. although it might be thirty-eight twenty, forty-eight twenty. I don't feel confident about which.<br><br><br><br>
If it were forty-eight twenty-one, ninety-seven sixty-three, 4 more, and then 2 more, it would be more of a challenge. There is a big differnce between a number with repeated twenties, and ones that don't have things like that, which I could use to help me remember them.<br><br><br><br>
There is also something about zero that helps me sort things out, since I think of zero as something I don't have to remember, because it, err, isn't anything.<br><br><br><br>
Hold on a minute: I am going to generate some random numbers to 14 places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
29451639837520<br><br><br><br>
Ok, if I <b>say</b> to myself, the number twenty-nine forty-five, instead of seeing 2, 9, 4, 5, I can remember my place, between 2945 and 1639, because I can then see the 4 digits 2945. I just keep saying to myself twenty-nine forty-five, and then I can locate the 1 in 1639.<br><br><br><br>
But if I say to myself twenty-nine forty-five, sixteen thirty-nine, I think I am lost. Let me try another one.<br><br><br><br>
65687544286859<br><br><br><br>
Yea. If I just say sixty-five sixty-eight (which for some reason I misread as sixty-five eighty-six, the first time I looked at it), and then sevetny-five forty four, by time I get to the twenty-eight sixty eight, I have forgotton the first 4-digit sequence, so I can't find the second 4-digit sequence any longer. The only way I can find it again is to do what I am doing here -- repeat the sixty-five sixty-eight and seventy-five forty-four sounds, in my head, <b>several times</b>.<br><br><br><br>
38505141240395<br><br><br><br>
Yea. Several times indeed. Just sounding it out in my head, 3 times, does not help me remember thirty-eight fifty, fifty-one forty one. I sitll can't remember it, even after I just wrote it. I have to look at it again. Thirty-eight fifty. Whoops, I looked at all eight, and sounded out all eight in my head, but I can only remember the first 4. And now I can't remember that anymore; I have to look at it again. Thirty-eight fifty, fifty-something. I'm remembering 6 digits now. Thirty-eight fifty, fifty-one forty one -- it is taking me awhile.<br><br><br><br>
Can I remember it? thirty-eight fifty, fifty-one forty one. Did I remember it? I'm not sure. I'd better check. OK, I got it right.<br><br><br><br>
But somehow I think it would take less time to simply pencil-in commas between groups of 3 or 4.<br><br><br><br>
Whoops, re-read that. I rememberd only 5 digits. Thirty-eight fifty, fifty-something is 5 digits, not six.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
OK gaya. i see what you are doing. And I can sort of do that with the number you supplied above -- but I think it is only because of the fact that 20 is repeated twice. All I can remember now, without looking back, about 30 seconds after looking at the number, is forty-eight-twenty, thirty-eight twenty, something, something. although it might be thirty-eight twenty, forty-eight twenty. I don't feel confident about which.<br><br><br><br>
If it were forty-eight twenty-one, ninety-seven sixty-three, 4 more, and then 2 more, it would be more of a challenge. There is a big differnce between a number with repeated twenties, and ones that don't have things like that, which I could use to help me remember them.<br><br><br><br>
There is also something about zero that helps me sort things out, since I think of zero as something I don't have to remember, because it, err, isn't anything.<br><br><br><br>
Hold on a minute: I am going to generate some random numbers to 14 places.</div>
</div>
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I typed those numbers randomly. I just pushed what every number keys on my key board. When I first looked at the sequence I tried to group them in three's but after noticing the 20's I saw a pattern so I grouped them in fours. So I suppose an aspect to remembering them is looking for patterns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
80124821914846<br><br><br><br>
OK, even after remembering eighty-twelve, forty-eight twenty-one, comitting the sound to memory, I still can't find my place in this number. The hardest part is finding the end of the forty-eight twelve string. Whoops. It is forty eight twenty one. Sorry. It was <b>eighty-twelve</b>, but the forty eight -- it was followed by a twenty-one, not by a twelve. I thought I had rememberd it correctly, but by time I tried to find my place in the sequence, I was saying forty-eight twelve to myself, instead of forty-eight twenty-one.<br><br><br><br>
with the mistake now corrected in my sounding-out memory, I'm still having trouble with this one. I tend to skip over the one in forty-eight twenty one, and jump right to the nine. Why? Because I'm using sound, and nine sounds a lot like one. Both have an n-sound, at the end. And even tho one does not have an initial consonant, the process of opening one's mouth before saying the vowel-sound represented by the "o", causes an inaudible n-sound. That is, I don't actually hear the n-sound if I say "one", because I don't use my vocal cord when i change from closed-mouth to opened-mouth. But the movement is there, and that is enough to make me sort of hear "one" as "mone" (the m-sound being produced when one opens one's lip, if one vibrate one's cords while opening them, instead of waiting until one is finished opening, before starting vibrating). And mone is close enough to mone, to make me thing none, that is, nine.<br><br><br><br>
Yes, I know it is really pronounced "won" but when you write it you start with the vowel sound being written down. And that is enough to make me think of one as sounding like the beginning of "onion" rather than sounding like "won." So I get it confused with nine.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
29451639837520<br><br><br><br>
Ok, if I <b>say</b> to myself, the number twenty-nine forty-five, instead of seeing 2, 9, 4, 5, I can remember my place, between 2945 and 1639, because I can then see the 4 digits 2945. I just keep saying to myself twenty-nine forty-five, and then I can locate the 1 in 1639.</div>
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In this instance I think it would be easier to remember two ninety four and five sixteen etc instead of grouping them in fours. I would group the last four digits though because there is a zero at the end. So we have tree groups of three and one group of four. I don't think it's necessary to remember all of the groups. For me five sixteen is easy to remember and of course the last group of seventy five twenty.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">65687544286859<br><br><br><br>
Yea. If I just say sixty-five sixty-eight (which for some reason I misread as sixty-five eighty-six, the first time I looked at it), and then sevetny-five forty four, by time I get to the twenty-eight sixty eight, I have forgotton the first 4-digit sequence, so I can't find the second 4-digit sequence any longer. The only way I can find it again is to do what I am doing here -- repeat the sixty-five sixty-eight and seventy-five forty-four sounds, in my head, <b>several times</b>.</div>
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Here i think it would be easier to remember six fifty six because there are two sixes. So 656 then 875. Having five as the last number in this group is easy for me to remember. Then 442 cuz there are two 4's etc.<br><br><br><br>
Again, it doesn't have to be a stead fast rule of 4 in a group or 3 in a group.
 

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It's so interesting how we process.<br><br>
I would group 80124821914846 as<br><br><br><br>
80 124 82 191 4846<br><br><br><br>
I chose this grouping because there are two numbers in the eightees (sp?) 191 because it looks like 9 is bracketed by the ones and 4846 because there are two 4's and eight and six are only two digits apart lol. Then 124 would just be random.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Gaya, without my yet figuring out why, I can say that doing it the way you said above doesn't seem to help me remember the numbers.
 
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