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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

Huh? When I was a fulltime student back in 1965-1967 I did NOT have any insurance coverage from the school. None whatsoever. When I got even the slightest illness, the school infirmary took care of only the most emergency problems, and then said get your own doctor with your own or your family's money or insurance. Again, the insurance I have now covers everything but dental care. I already took care of my hernias, and my stomach ulcers and am taking care of my prostate and my pain, with this insuarance. But all the dental insurance will cover is emergency extraction of teeth and leaving me with dangerously shifting other teeth.
I don't know about other states but in MA insurance is mandatory and if the student doesn't have it then you'll get signed on to the school's medical plan. You still have to pay for it though but grants can cover it. Five years ago it was around 5-600 a year and now it's almost 900. We don't get dental.

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" I am sure you would do great in school."

I am not. I am articulate. The kind of ability required to do well in school is very different. I am not sure that I am not "learning-disabled" in that regard. I find it confusing to try and take more than 1 course at once, and often find that I have to do 12 times as much homework, for one course, as the amount the instructors suggest is needed. I timed it.
From reading your posts this past year I can see how you could have a problem with a large course load. At the same time, your type of "smarts" would be such an advantage.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

So why name a variable t, for time, when you can name it time? Why say d/t=v when you can say distance/time = velocity? I'll forget what the t stands for, if you name it t.
Well, if you are not using a computer to calculate velocity it's simply easier to write v. In my physics class we don't use computers and have to write and write and write with a time limit. It simply saves time. It gets sticky because some abbreviations (like v) can mean different things depending on what you are doing...like when considering electricity v means voltage (in my books at least).

eta: as eggplant said you should get yourself tested, maybe you could learn some memory tricks.

btw eggplant, you are always so helpful to vb members.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

" It gets sticky because some abbreviations (like v) can mean different things depending on what you are doing."

Ezzactly.

When I first started learning elementry algebra, i was taught that simply writing a formula, without including a statement of what the variables stood for, would get us points off on a test. We had to say "given v=velocity, t=time, and d=distance, v=d/t. Or given v=voltage, I= current and Z equals complex impedence, v=IZ. Of course, sometimes E was used for voltage (E standing for "electromotive force" or "electrical potential") So you needed to declare your variables or nothing would make sense.
Recently in a lab the lab prof took points off my quiz for not writing out the formulas. I was pissed. It was a very simple question and you can obviously infer the formula from what work I did write down but he nailed me. The question was about getting the acceleration from an electric charge or something. The formulas were only E(electric field) = F(force)/q(charge) with E and q given and then determining the acceleration with the mass given and the force from the previous equation. It only has two frigging parts and I lost 30% from my grade because I didn't write the letters out (only half the numbers). I've never had to do that before. Sorry, I'm just complaining.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

For 35 years I had assumed that my thing where I needed to put commas between every 3 numerals, before I could read off a number, to be normal. After all, why would this be a convention when writing numbers, if it wasn't hard for everone to read off numbers that weren't demarcated this way? The fact that I could actually read 4 numerals, instead of 3, I took as evidence me being slightly more capable in this area, than the average person whom I believe could only read 3. That's right, if I see 100 I can tell you it is one hundred. If I see 1000 I can tell you it is 1000. I figured most people couldn't. I knew I certainly couldn't tell you what 10000 was. All I knew was that it was either 100,000 or 10,000. I couldn't tell you which, unless I demarcated it.

However one day while working in the accounting department of a company as a bookkeeper, someone asked me to look at a cell on a spread sheet, and read off the 10-digit number that was there, with closely spaced numerals and no demarcations between them. I couldn't do it. I'd known for 30 years that I couldn't do it, but I thought neither could anyone else. He refused to believe me. He thought I was just trying to be difficult. Then I asked him to read off the number, and I saw that he was able to (I added commas, and checked to see if he was right).
Well, you are right that people do tend to remember numbers in segments of 3's but we don't need to put physical comma's between the groupings. I just visualize it I guess. I focuss on the first three and then the next three and then the next, kind of like mental commas.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

" I focuss on the first three and then the next three and then the next, kind of like mental commas."

Interesting. I just don't seem to be able to do that. Even while continuously staring at a long series of digits, and not looking away at what I am writing, I cant read off 3 digits, then 3 more digits, then 3 more. I slip "off track." I read off 3 digits, then 3 more, then I can't see where the next 3 start. I'll fall back a digit, or 2, or slip ahead one -- I can't be sure if I am at digit 7, or I have slipped back to 5 or 6, or 8 or 9.
Well, first off, if you're reading numbers on a computer screen or a printed out spread sheet where the numbers are pretty small it may be more difficult than reading them off a chalk board. Today in class I thought of you and made sure I was able to read and remember the numbers as I stated and I was able to easily.

Now on a computer screen...

38205820495820

yes, I am able to read them and remember them or at least find my place in the middle of sequence without a problem. When I look at the list of numbers I don't see 3.8.2.0.5.8.2.0 etc. I see 3820 5820 4958 20 - thirty-eight-twenty... fifty-eight-twenty...forty-nine fifity-eight...twenty. If I were to look at the numbers individually I would lose my place or get confused. They are in groups and I treat the groups as individuals. Therefore, there are only 4 individuals I need to remember separately, if that makes any sense. It's hard to describe mental processes.

eta: also, as I'm reading the groups of numbers I am sounding them out in my mind. So, not only am I reading it but I am hearing it also if that makes any difference. I am not hearing three, eight, two, zero etc. I am hearing thirty eight twenty.

etaa: So...thirty eight twenty is one number. It's not one interger but it is one number. Again, I only have to memorize 4 numbers which are the original groups.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

OK gaya. i see what you are doing. And I can sort of do that with the number you supplied above -- but I think it is only because of the fact that 20 is repeated twice. All I can remember now, without looking back, about 30 seconds after looking at the number, is forty-eight-twenty, thirty-eight twenty, something, something. although it might be thirty-eight twenty, forty-eight twenty. I don't feel confident about which.

If it were forty-eight twenty-one, ninety-seven sixty-three, 4 more, and then 2 more, it would be more of a challenge. There is a big differnce between a number with repeated twenties, and ones that don't have things like that, which I could use to help me remember them.

There is also something about zero that helps me sort things out, since I think of zero as something I don't have to remember, because it, err, isn't anything.

Hold on a minute: I am going to generate some random numbers to 14 places.
I typed those numbers randomly. I just pushed what every number keys on my key board. When I first looked at the sequence I tried to group them in three's but after noticing the 20's I saw a pattern so I grouped them in fours. So I suppose an aspect to remembering them is looking for patterns.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

29451639837520

Ok, if I say to myself, the number twenty-nine forty-five, instead of seeing 2, 9, 4, 5, I can remember my place, between 2945 and 1639, because I can then see the 4 digits 2945. I just keep saying to myself twenty-nine forty-five, and then I can locate the 1 in 1639.
In this instance I think it would be easier to remember two ninety four and five sixteen etc instead of grouping them in fours. I would group the last four digits though because there is a zero at the end. So we have tree groups of three and one group of four. I don't think it's necessary to remember all of the groups. For me five sixteen is easy to remember and of course the last group of seventy five twenty.

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65687544286859

Yea. If I just say sixty-five sixty-eight (which for some reason I misread as sixty-five eighty-six, the first time I looked at it), and then sevetny-five forty four, by time I get to the twenty-eight sixty eight, I have forgotton the first 4-digit sequence, so I can't find the second 4-digit sequence any longer. The only way I can find it again is to do what I am doing here -- repeat the sixty-five sixty-eight and seventy-five forty-four sounds, in my head, several times.
Here i think it would be easier to remember six fifty six because there are two sixes. So 656 then 875. Having five as the last number in this group is easy for me to remember. Then 442 cuz there are two 4's etc.

Again, it doesn't have to be a stead fast rule of 4 in a group or 3 in a group.
 

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It's so interesting how we process.

I would group 80124821914846 as

80 124 82 191 4846

I chose this grouping because there are two numbers in the eightees (sp?) 191 because it looks like 9 is bracketed by the ones and 4846 because there are two 4's and eight and six are only two digits apart lol. Then 124 would just be random.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

Gaya, without my yet figuring out why, I can say that doing it the way you said above doesn't seem to help me remember the numbers.
Sorry I couldn't help. The more I think about how I remember these numbers the more screwy it seems lol.
 

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Originally Posted by soilman View Post

Unless I do it the same way all the time, I can't remember which way I just did it. That is, unless I always use the same number of digits per group, every time I try to remember a number, I won't remember how long the first group is, that I decide to create, and how long the next group is, etcetera.
As stated already, you might find help at a learning center. If there are people who are familiar with your style of thinking/learning then maybe they could offer tricks that would be more your style.
 
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