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As I've been getting my high B vimtains needs under control, I am still struggling with the effects of being hyper sensitive to cold.<br><br><br><br>
This is made more difficult because the colder it gets outside, the less the heating system can keep up. So most of the time it feels like a walk in fridge, according to my thermometer it was 40 degrees today. Not sure how cold it was outside since I have my thermometer attached to my wall.<br><br><br><br>
I realize mahy people live with less then ideal heating systems so yes I'm being a wuss or whatever. Today I went to a public building to warm up and ended up staying there mst of the day. Anyone know good ways of coping with cold weather for the cold senstive?.
 

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One thing you can do is keep your air humidified. It makes it feel warmer. I am also sensitve to cold (although all tests say my thyroid is fine and when I tried synthroid, it just kept me up and night with an urge to kick.) You can also try to limit yourself to one or two rooms and keep those ones warmer than the others so you don't need the heat on more. I used plastic drop sheets to do this in one apartment. Put blankets over windows to stop drafts.
 

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Wear extra warm socks, or 2 pair if you're really cold. If that still doesn't cut it, put on a warm scarf and, if need be, a hat. And if you're still cold after that, make a nice hot cup of tea/coffee. Don't forget about sweaters/sweatshirts.<br><br>
~Wondre <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>~Wonder</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Wear extra warm socks, or 2 pair if you're really cold. If that still doesn't cut it, put on a warm scarf and, if need be, a hat. And if you're still cold after that, make a nice hot cup of tea/coffee. Don't forget about sweaters/sweatshirts.<br><br>
~Wondre <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:"></div>
</div>
<br><br><br><br><br>
I'll add that a good dose of B-vitamins will fix you up just dandy!
 

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Your not a wuss! 40 degrees is cold!<br><br><br><br>
Eating spicey foods will help you warm up too. Are you in control of the heating? If not, a space heater can help - they are pretty cheap and will warm a good sized area (depending on the type you get). Sometimes I just sit in front of mine and let it blow on my face (my nose gets cold quick!). Also, if you can, invest in an electric blanket.<br><br><br><br>
A really thick comforter will keep you super toasty at night.
 
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i really feel the cold too, especially in my hands and feet. it's horrible to feel cold, and it bloody hurts too, so i empathise.<br><br><br><br>
here is some stuff that helps a bit for me:<br><br><br><br>
-hot water bottles, topped up regularly- have a couple in bed at night- one for your feet, one for your chest/tummy, and one for your bum (lol) and during the day, you can wear one up your jumper, if you need to, even. they're not really expensive to buy, and hot tap water is pretty cheap too.<br><br><br><br>
-wear lots of layers- i often wear socks to bed, and in the day wear 3 pairs of socks, and a pair of slippers on top, just to keep my feet warm enough that they don't hurt.<br><br><br><br>
-you can wear gloves inside, in the day and at night too- convertable fingerless ones with a flap to make them into mittens are handy, cos you can do stuff without taking them off, and then flip them back closed into mittens when you don't need your finger movements so much. i bet you could sew the end of some socks onto some gloves with the fingers cut off, to make your own, if need be.<br><br><br><br>
-if you're really cold, and a bajillion jumpers isn't helping, take a long warm bath, put your clothes near a radiator while you're in the tub (if you have upright radiators), and get dried and dressed as soon as you're out, to keep the residual warmth in.<br><br><br><br>
-washing dishes, cooking and hanging out near the oven are also sneaky ways to get and stay warm- and do housework at the same time. if i'm making soup or bread or something that takes a while to cook, i'll stay in the kitchen with it, and keep from the residual heat from the stove. you can always take a stool and a book with you, so you don't have to stand around aimlessly, getting bored, watching soup simmer, lol.<br><br><br><br>
- keeping moving: just wiggling your toes and fingers, or walking about a bit, can help keep your circulation going - i know from your other posts that you get tired easily, but if you can give yourself a bit of a shake occasionally and get things moving- tap your feet a bit while watching tv, shake your wrists occasionally, etc, the excercise will help warm you up a bit. if you suddenly feel spurred into action, walking up and down the stairs a few times will help even more.
 

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I feel the cold too!<br><br><br><br>
Hence why I sleep with P.J's, a dressing gown, thick socks, a hot water bottle, two blankets and a duvet! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I feel the cold so badly too! If you're underweight, that could make you feel the cold more?<br><br><br><br>
- I have a hot-air blower heater trained on my feet at my desk at work and in my room at home. They are excellent but expensive to run and not environmentally friendly so try to limit use!<br><br>
- Invest in a very good scarf, a pretty little fluffy hat, leather gloves and a full-length thick coat if you can afford it. I have got this set-up together over a few years and don't care if I look a bit stupid all covered-up as I feel much warmer.<br><br>
- If you wear knee-high boots, wear tights and then put knee-high thick socks underneath as well. Nobody will know! Same socks work well under trousers. I got cashmere knee-highs for Christmas!<br><br>
- Pocket hand-warmers, buy from chemists, the ones you click a button and they are warm for a few hours. Some are rechargable by putting them in hot water for a while and others are only to use once. Very good.<br><br>
- Hot water bottles are good all-rounders (cheap, not so bad for environment, heat lasts for ages) and not just for use in bed- I sometimes carry mine around with me about the house (and when I had an office in the attic of an ancient building- I'm an archivist- I carried one around there, too!)<br><br>
- Don't eat frozen or fridge-cold items as this'll really lower your temperature! Drink hot drinks like herbal teas when you need warming up and eat hot soups and stews at mealtimes.<br><br>
- Wash your hands in hot water and run your wrists under the hot tap too as it does seem to warm the blood somehow!<br><br>
- Put two duvets on your bed; other useful things to have in/ on the bed include cats, dogs and men (this last is particularly effective, as men seem to get very hot during the night and you can also cuddle up and warm your toes on them- WARNING, sometimes they don't like this <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> and do of course choose your man wisely as they have negative sides such as f*rting in their sleep, snoring/grinding their teeth and a propensity to duvet-steal)<br><br>
- My absolute favourite thing, and the thing that works best of all, is my electric blanket- switch it on, on the highest heat setting for ten mins before getting into bed and you'll sleep so much better in a lovely warm bed. Mine switches itself off after a set time, too, which is great. Only cost 30 pounds stering and revolutionised my life!<br><br><br><br>
Good luck and happy warming <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Run a hot bath and fill with some grated ginger root. The ginger will heat the bath and make your skin warm.
 

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Some people are trained to withstand cold. The Ona of Tierra del Fuego bathed their newborn babies in seawater at a temperature of 8° C! It has also something to do with the thickness of the skin. If you're "skinny", you're much more likely to feel cold. There are some medical conditions, however. Hypothyroidism would be one.<br><br>
Perhaps you'll have your thyroid hormone status taken. And in the mean time look, if some of these excellent tips above can help you.
 

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I wanted to say something else about your heat. You didn't mention whether or not you are in control of the heat in your place.<br><br><br><br>
If you are not and you rent and it is 40 degrees in your place, I believe it is against the law for it to be that cold (might depend on the state you are in - your profile says VT - Vermont?).<br><br><br><br>
In one of my apartments, I had radiator heat (which is usually awesome) and hardly any heat came out one winter and it was below zero temp outside. The landlord was trying to get it fixed. Me and my cats were freezing! But I believe that the temperature in your place has to be at least in the 50s and 60s - legally (if landlord is providing the heat for you).<br><br><br><br>
Don't know if that is why you are also cold or not - if so you have a right to complain.
 

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I want to know if this is the heat inside your home? I don't think that's ok at all. Can you not afford to turn it up or is it not working properly.<br><br><br><br>
We use plug-in radiant heaters in rooms that don't heat well. They are inexpensive to run and if you must you can find them at Walmart for around $40. You can keep it on the number one and leave it on all day. It warms up slowly, but if you get it going all day it will heat up a room with a nice moist feeling heat. It doesn't dry out like central heat. It's less expensive than trying to run a bad system, too. The ones I'm talking about look like the old fashioned wall coil radiator heaters.
 

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I want to say a bit more about layers.<br><br><br><br>
It's all about the layering. When it's -40 Celcius here, I will wear long underwear, a tank top, a tshirt, a long sleved shirt, a zip up hoodie, and a pullover sweater, and 2 pairs of yoga pants, then normal sweats and pajama pants over top.<br><br>
There would also be 2 pairs of socks and slippers, and generally a toque or a hood.<br><br>
I feel a litte like the micheline man, but it's warm and cosy.<br><br><br><br>
It's easy to forget that adding more clothes= warmer.<br><br><br><br>
I was out camping a few years ago and spent 2 nights shivering in front of a fire until it occured to me to put on every article of clothing I had with me.<br><br><br><br>
Problem solved.
 

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I should be trained to withstand the cold by now (can reach -50C here) but that isn't the case. I am also always cold, which may be partly due to my weight, or that I have low blood pressure (the doctors told me years ago) poor circulation. I have my heat up in my apartment (never above 80 F, as anything over could be detrimental to my geckos) and I wear sweaters and layers, if need be. Washing dishes, standing in front of the stove, and hot showers work wonders. As does a nice cup of tea. If I'm staying outside for a longish period of time during the winter, I wear layers of clothing - long johns, two pairs of socks, mits, neck warmer, hood up, warm jacket, sweater, and sometimes slush pants. Yet, I'm still cold. But it helps somewhat.
 

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I'm confused... the inside temp was 40? the temperature of the wall was 40? If the temperature inside your dwelling was 40F, then you need to talk to your landlord because that's illegal. What temperature did the thermostat say it was?<br><br><br><br>
I'm extremely intolerant to cold. My old apartment I paid heat so I kept it at 65 degrees when I was home and awake, and 60 degrees the rest of the time, including at night. I wore a lot of layers, including my fleece bathrobe, and set up a warm-mist humidifier in my bedroom, AND I had an electric blanket, which was the best thing EVER! They also make electric mattress pads to heat the bed. I still live in a drafty old house but the heat is included in rent, and we sleep on the 3rd floor, and my boyfriend is an extremely warm person, so now I'm usually overheated at night. When it gets too cold during the day/evening, I hang on the 3rd floor where the heat rises to.
 
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