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Our landlord installed an ugly fence around our yard this winter. This has its plusses and minuses. A plus is that they dug up every hideous, shade producing, unkempt tree and bush, and the entire yard, so now there's nothing stopping me from planting a garden wherever the heck I see fit. (I see the middle of the yard as fit)

The minus is that it's ugly. I'd like to plant something that climbs and flowers to cover up/decorate some of the fence. Any suggestions?

(I live in the North East, in central NY, if that helps at all... )
 

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For fast and easy color, nothing beats Sunflowers. For climbing, you might try, to start, Sweet Peas, then Morning glory, Lablab beans (also called Hyacinth beans), Flag of Spain (Mina lobata). For additional easy color in the foreground, I'd go with Zinnias.
 

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If you want a fast growing vine that flowers, try the Passion Flower{Passiflora incarnata}. Mine dies back each winter but comes back every summer and grows all up the side of my house. And as it is also a useful herbal sedative for treating insomnia and nerve pain. If you want a tall flowering plant try Hollihocks they can get up to 10 feet tall and have the most beautful flowers from top to bottom. Or another useful plant is Elecampane {Inula helenium} This is a very tall plant that has groups of sunflower like blooms that move to follow the sun. The dried root makes an excellent expectorant to treat irritating coughs.
 

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I like passionflower also, but, I find it a bit invasive, that is, it sends out running roots which pop up as vines in the yard, many feet away from the original plant. I didn't expect this when I planted it. It's merely annoying, however.
 

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As a newbie gardener, the plants and vines you mention sound great ... do you know if any are suitable for a dry climate such as Denver Colorado?
 

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I've grown both Morning glory and Mina lobata in Central Texas without additional irrigation once they were really growing well, but, I think we get about twice the rain you do, unless we're in a drought year (average annual rain 28 inches, drought year 15 inches). Hyacinth bean likes plenty of water. Sunflowers need water, but are considered somewhat drought tolerant.
 
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