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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, I'm not planning on eating any dairy products, so remain calm lol. I REALLY want (almost need) some of my dark vegan chocolate I get from Sainsbury's but obviously I have none and I'm not able to get any right now. I was looking for something sweet to eat but all I found was normal dairy chocolate (and biscuits), so this question came to mind: What do you think about clearing out animal products lying around your house if you had them there since before you turned vegan? Obviously we have the whole moral side of it, but wouldn't it be better to finish them off and at least put them to good use rather than waste them, if you see what I mean? If the animal's already suffered having its udder sucked dry and you've already paid for it, wouldn't it be better to put it to use rather than just throw it away? This is obviously considering no one else wants to eat it. As I said, I'm not gonna go and clear out the cupboards or anything, but I was just wondering what people's thoughts on this were.
 

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I used mine all up, why waste something you already have? Like you said ti would be a bigger waste. And once they are all gone, simply don't buy them again.

I'm still using up my supply of meal replacements, and that's nearly 14 months later. I barely use them but to throw them would be a huge waste of money.
 

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I was at boarding school at the time so I didnt have that problem but I bet id have thrown everything out at the time. Now I'd give stuff away or use it up.
 

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Luckily I'm in an omnivore family so they ate the stuff like cheese and mayo, but I had a two foot tall easter bunny, a pound of chocolate, a halloween basket of chocolate, and an easter basket of chocolate, and some chocolate from Christmas and Valentine's Day that I ate the weekend before going full vegan, when I was just contemplating going vegan. My mom said I had to eat it myself because they didn't want it.

I say there's not a problem with eating it now. If you throw it away, then the animals suffered for nothing, and veganism is a journey. When I actually made the decision to go vegan, I cut out all animal products at once, but there's no way to literally go vegan overnight because there are things like animal tested products that you can't just replace right away. I've been vegan for 3 months but I guess I'm still not really vegan because my omnivore family still uses things like dish soap that may be tested on animals, and I use it to washing dishes because I don't buy everything yet, since I'm 15, but I do all I can to try to convince them to buy things not tested on animals, but they buy whatever's cheapest.

I think being vegan is about the journey and having good intentions and doing all you can to make your life as vegan as possible.
 

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I ate the perishable stuff and anything that was already opened and just replaced it all with vegan versions when I next went shopping. Canned goods like tuna, soup, etc., I packed in a bag and gave to a food bank.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenish View Post

I ate the perishable stuff and anything that was already opened and just replaced it all with vegan versions when I next went shopping. Canned goods like tuna, soup, etc., I packed in a bag and gave to a food bank.
Thats a great idea, the food bank!
 

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I favor finishing stuff off rather than throwing it away. If you can give it to a family member or donate to a food pantry, that works too.

I still have a few things in the freezer from before I stopped eating dairy and eggs, but my husband is lacto-ovo so I think those will eventually be taken care of.
 

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I don't see a problem with finishing them off. You already bought them.
 

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Originally Posted by GK420 View Post

If the animal's already suffered having its udder sucked dry and you've already paid for it, wouldn't it be better to put it to use rather than just throw it away?
Ethical veganism is an emotional response (rather than a practical one) to the suffering of non-human animals, and I believe that if someone is truly processing that suffering in their own mind, it usually results in a significant psychological shift in their thinking making it extremely difficult to carry on eating or using animal products when they have a choice not to.

It's my personal belief that vegans who can put that emotional response aside and switch on their practical side so they can eat a packet of biscuits or wear non-vegan clothes for reasons of frugality, are probably people who, psychologically, have some way to go in completely undertanding and empathising with animal suffering. Or, they are people who are mainly motivated to eat a vegan diet for health reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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Originally Posted by Nishani View Post

Ethical veganism is an emotional response (rather than a practical one) to the suffering of non-human animals, and I believe that if someone is truly processing that suffering in their own mind, it usually results in a significant psychological shift in their thinking making it extremely difficult to carry on eating or using animal products when they have a choice not to.

It's my personal belief that vegans who can put that emotional response aside and switch on their practical side so they can eat a packet of biscuits or wear non-vegan clothes for reasons of frugality, are probably people who, psychologically, have some way to go in completely undertanding and empathising with animal suffering. Or, they are people who are mainly motivated to eat a vegan diet for health reasons.
I was thinking someone might say something along those lines. Since going veg*n I have felt a lot different about meat/animal products in the supermarket, but not to the point where I'm going to throw up or start crying. I understand what you mean though, but obviously there are the two different areas of veganism. I suppose I'm not at that point yet, because as much as I hate to see animals suffering, it's not going to make me suicidal and hate myself for maybe eating a chocolate bourbon.
 

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It's interesting... when I first transitioned, I was absolutely OK with finishing off the stuff I had in my kitchen. It just seemed sensible to me. Now that I've been eating vegan for over 4 months, I'm really uninterested in eating food with animal products in it. My niece was staying with me and she had a cheese pizza one night. She forgot to take the leftovers home with her and I ended up throwing them away rather than eating them. I also found some frozen meatballs at the back of the freezer recently. I haven't done anything with them yet, but I'll likely end up throwing them away. It's wasteful, but I have zero interest in eating them. I could have eaten them while I was transitioning, but now my only real thought is "Yuck!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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Originally Posted by greenish View Post

It's interesting... when I first transitioned, I was absolutely OK with finishing off the stuff I had in my kitchen. It just seemed sensible to me. Now that I've been eating vegan for over 4 months, I'm really uninterested in eating food with animal products in it. My niece was staying with me and she had a cheese pizza one night. She forgot to take the leftovers home with her and I ended up throwing them away rather than eating them. I also found some frozen meatballs at the back of the freezer recently. I haven't done anything with them yet, but I'll likely end up throwing them away. It's wasteful, but I have zero interest in eating them. I could have eaten them while I was transitioning, but now my only real thought is "Yuck!"
Yeah, same here. I couldn't eat meat, it'd just feel weird. Dairy products wouldn't be as bad but there's still always the voice in the back of your head saying "don't do it, traitor" lol.
 

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When I get back to uni I'm giving all of my non vegan food to my house mates. They'll use it so there's no point in wasting it. I'm definitely not going to eat it. Once I go vegan, I'm going in full.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenish View Post

It's interesting... when I first transitioned, I was absolutely OK with finishing off the stuff I had in my kitchen. It just seemed sensible to me. Now that I've been eating vegan for over 4 months, I'm really uninterested in eating food with animal products in it. My niece was staying with me and she had a cheese pizza one night. She forgot to take the leftovers home with her and I ended up throwing them away rather than eating them. I also found some frozen meatballs at the back of the freezer recently. I haven't done anything with them yet, but I'll likely end up throwing them away. It's wasteful, but I have zero interest in eating them. I could have eaten them while I was transitioning, but now my only real thought is "Yuck!"
well itd prob be hard to give away old frozen balls.........
 
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