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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have been a vegetarian for almost a month now and am already starting to notice that people really do treat vegetarians differently and its a little frustrating. The women in my church are having a get together dinner tomorrow night and I asked one of the people in charge what was being served. She didn't know exactly but one of the other women said she knows there will be some type of chicken roll. I don't want to eat meat at the get togethers, I also don't want to show up and then just sit there not eating anything. So what do I do about that?

I have just noticed that everytime I mention to someone I'm going vegetarian they give me this look like "okay, why" and then ask me if I'm still going to do eggs and milk to make sure I get protein. Argh!!
 

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Bring some of your own food, potluck-style, with enough to share. You'll have a tasty meal to enjoy, and maybe even a few around you will want to try some, too.

For some very good advice on living veggie in an omni world, try the book "Living Among Meat Eaters" by Carol Adams.
 

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I'd offer to bring something too.
 

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I bring a dish that can be eaten either as a side for other people or a main dish for myself... and often a yummy vegan dessert!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

I bring a dish that can be eaten either as a side for other people or a main dish for myself... and often a yummy vegan dessert!
Agreed. I'd also take a stack of the "Honoring God's Creation" pamphlets from the fine folks over at CVA.
 

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The attitudes of churches and people in general vary, but if you talk to the people preparing the food, they'd probably be happy to come up with something (simple) for you... especially if you pitch in and help. Pitching in and helping is a big part of what being part of a church is about no matter who you are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by froggythefrog View Post

The attitudes of churches and people in general vary, but if you talk to the people preparing the food, they'd probably be happy to come up with something (simple) for you... especially if you pitch in and help. Pitching in and helping is a big part of what being part of a church is about no matter who you are.
Thank you for that. I actually teach one of the youth classes and also am responsible for some of the activities we do as a church :)
 

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Chances are, the people in your church are well-intentioned but may not have much experience with vegetarians. I second the suggestions to offer to help and/or bring food to add to the potluck. Sometimes church dinners are everyone-pitch-in deals and other times it's the same meal for everyone, and the cooks would appreciate knowing if you're planning to bring something.
 

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Or, you could bring it up and find that one of the cooks has a child/grandchild who is vegetarian and now that they know, they'll make sure there are options. You just don't know what the response will be.

Some of those church ladies can be great cooks, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just wanted to mention I went to the get-together last night. I called the sister in charge of the food and asked if I could bring something. She thought it would be a good idea since there wouldn't be much else for me to eat. So I brought a corn and tomato gratin (french dish) and it was a big hit! Everybody kept saying how good it was and what did I put in it...I am supposed to bring the recipe on Sunday. One girl even told me she thought it was better than the main dish, the chicken roll-ups :-D

Here's the recipe in case anyone would like it. I'll also go post it in the recipe section.

CORN AND TOMATO GRATIN

1 1/2 lb red or yellow tomatoes (4 medium), cut crosswise

nto 1/2-inch-thick slices

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon black pepper

4 cups fresh corn kernels (from 6 to 8 ears)

1 cup whole milk

1/2 cup heavy cream

2 cups fresh bread crumbs (preferably from a day-old baguette; an 8-inch piece, including crust)

1/2 cup chopped fresh basil

1 oz finely grated parmesan (1/2 cup)

3/4 stick (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces, plus additional for buttering pan

Arrange tomato slices in 1 layer on a rack set in a shallow baking pan and sprinkle on both sides with 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Let drain 30 minutes.

While tomatoes drain, bring corn, milk, cream, and 1/4 teaspoon salt to a simmer in a 2- to 3-quart heavy saucepan over high heat, then reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until corn is tender, about 5 minutes. Cool slightly, uncovered.

Put oven rack in upper third of oven and preheat oven to 375°F. Butter a shallow 2-quart baking dish.

Toss together bread crumbs, basil, cheese, and remaining 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper in another bowl.

Arrange one third of tomato slices in baking dish, then cover evenly with one third of bread-crumb mixture and dot with one third of butter. Spoon half of corn mixture over crumbs, then repeat layering with half of remaining tomatoes, crumbs, and butter, and all of corn. Arrange remaining tomatoes over corn, then top with remaining bread crumbs and dot with remaining butter.

Bake, uncovered, until top is golden and gratin is bubbling all over, 40 to 45 minutes. Cool slightly on a rack, about 15 minutes, before serving.

Cooks' note: Gratin can be assembled, but not baked, 4 hours ahead and chilled, covered. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes before baking.

Makes 6 to 8 (side dish) servings.
 
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