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I copied this material from another site. I have incorporated these seed in my diet for over a week now.

Hi everyone,

I'm new to the group and wanted to share my research on chia seed. I work at ***at the Reference Desk of *** Library and have access to lots of great information and databases. Chia's Latin name is "salvia hispanica" and it is related to sage and mint. I found out about it through my own research when I was looking for more vegan sources of omega 3s. I know about flax and have taken that as well,

but it has drawbacks: unstable as an oil, goes rancid quickly, has to be ground to be absorbed, has no antioxidants, as well as some of the unhealthy aspects that *** mentioned. So I found research (in fact a whole book, cited below) on chia seeds and that they are the highest plant form of omega 3s without the lipid oxidation problem. Yep, we all should have been eating the Chia Pets not decorating with them! Omegas 3s is just one of a dozen incredible properties that this plant has. The book below can explain it in much more scientific detail than I can but here's an overview:

-the oil has the highest percentage of alpha-linolenic

acid known

-high calcium (5-6 times that of milk)

-complete protein

-high soluble fiber

-absorbs 9-10 times it's weight when water is added

and makes a gel

-potassium

-magnesium

-iron

-anti-oxidants: chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid,

myricetin, quercetin, and kaempferol flavonol

-non-allergenic

-stable ground or in seed form

-and more

There is only one organic source I have found. It's from a site called Dancing Algae

(http://www.dancingalg... , and he posts his IFOAM certification on the web. Most chia sources get theirs from Mexico, Central America, and South America. It's similar to bamboo and hemp in that it's naturally pest-resistant. Chia has an amazing history, as an Aztec and Southern California native energy food. Aztecs were able to store the chia seeds and chia flour for years without rancidity. I have incorporated them into my diet instead of flax and have noticed significant improvements to my overall energy, skin tone, and hair. And they are much easier to use than flax.

1 tablespoon of chia seed nutritionally approximately equals:

4 oz. salmon (omega 3s)

1/2 c. milk (calcium)

2/3 c. spinach (iron)

1 orange (vitamin c)

1/4 c. kidney beans (protein)

1/5 of one banana (potassium)

3 T. All-Bran cereal (fiber)

I add 10 parts water to 1 part chia seed (for example, add 2 and a half cups water to 4 T. of chia seed), stir it, and then store the gel that it makes in the fridge for up to three weeks. I add a few tablespoons of the gel to juice, or anything really. It has almost no flavor. You get all the benefits without grinding them. It's incredibly easy and I have to say I feel great and have noticeably more energy.

Books:

"Chia: Rediscovering a Forgotten Crop of the Aztecs"

by Ricardo Ayerza, Jr. and Wayne Coates

Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2005

(available on Amazon and in academic libraries)

-this book really dives into scientific research on

chia, but does provide historical context

-has a 37 page bibliography of articles

"The Magic of Chia: Revival of an Ancient Wonder Food"

by James F. Scheer

Berkeley, CA: Frog, Ltd. 2001

-does provide some science but much more of a popular

title, still useful though and talks about how one

might use chia in daily life

Websites:

Chia information and history

http://www.eatchia.com/...

Dr. Weil comments on chia seed

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA365093...

Dr. Weil article in Prevention Magazine about chia

http://www.prevention.com/article/0,...7485-1,00.html...

Organic chia source

http://www.dancingalgae.com/chiaseed.html...

Interview with Dr. Ricardo Ayerza about chia

http://www.newstarget.com/015405.html...

The Omega Tree

http://www.theomegatree.com/...

Arizona Chia Info and Seed Source

http://www.chiaseedandoil.com/...

Article from "Economic Botany" (Vol.57, Issue 4, November 2003, pp.604-618) titled "Ethnobotany of chia, Salvia hispanica" by Joseph P. Cahill:

http://www.bioone.org/perlserv/?requ...L%5D2.0.CO%3B2...

I hope this is helpful to others in the group. I've also seen studies about feeding chia seed to chickens instead of flax with definite advantages. I'll track those down and post them here.

Best,

Laura

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_hispanica
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegan Joe View Post

Chia's Latin name is "salvia hispanica"
I'm so glad chiaheads can get their omega - 3's while riding down the sparkling neon river in their flower-powered electric bananaberry boat. Far out groovy nutrients, maaaaaan!

 

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Originally Posted by Katieq View Post

I really expected this thread to be about the cruelty involved in raising chia pets.
You know, I really don't agree with humans' enslavement of Chias for our own personal entertainment. I think we should work to abolish the existence of companion Chias and just admire them from afar, let them live out their lives naturally, the way it's supposed to be.

 

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Originally Posted by Katt Fink View Post

You know, I really don't agree with humans' enslavement of Chias for our own personal entertainment. I think we should work to abolish the existence of companion Chias and just admire them from afar, let them live out their lives naturally, the way it's supposed to be.

exactly!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by peace View Post

I'm so glad chiaheads can get their omega - 3's while riding down the sparkling neon river in their flower-powered electric bananaberry boat. Far out groovy nutrients, maaaaaan!

AFAIK, salvia divinorum is the only Salvia plant with hallucinogenic properties...
 
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