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I read on the internet that ricotta is made the same way paneer is and rennet is not needed in this process. But, when I look at the packaging of ricotta tubs in the supermarket, some specify that they are vegetarian and others don't say that they are? This is the same for different brands of feta cheese also, suggesting some brands can confirm they didn't use animal rennet and others cannot, so they can't claim it's vegetarian.


How is it that different brands of the same cheese can say a different thing on the packaging regarding whether they are sutiable for vegetarians or not?

Because of this, i don't know whether to buy meals at my school such as a greek salad in case the feta was made with animal rennet?
The only vegetarian option at my school prom will be spinach and ricotta cannelloni, but how do I know that this meal is actually vegetarian?
It seems many people working at preparing food may not know what goes in to the food during the process, and things could be incorrectly labelled as vegetarian.


Any advice?
Sorry if anything i've written here isn't correct, I chose to follow this diet less than a year ago
Thank you!!!!
 

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You could go out to dinner at a restaurant you trust before going to the prom. Or, if it is possible, you can ask the caterer who is preparing the dinner for the prom what brand of cheese or frozen cannelloni (if they aren't making it from scratch) they they are using.
 

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Any advice?
Sorry if anything i've written here isn't correct, I chose to follow this diet less than a year ago
Thank you!!!!
My advice is not to worry too much about it, avoiding rennet is going to have no impact on the meat industry and its obviously making your food choices difficult. Focus on the things that matter, like sticking to a vegetarian diet.
 

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I read on the internet that ricotta is made the same way paneer is and rennet is not needed in this process. But, when I look at the packaging of ricotta tubs in the supermarket, some specify that they are vegetarian and others don't say that they are? This is the same for different brands of feta cheese also, suggesting some brands can confirm they didn't use animal rennet and others cannot, so they can't claim it's vegetarian.


How is it that different brands of the same cheese can say a different thing on the packaging regarding whether they are sutiable for vegetarians or not?

Because of this, i don't know whether to buy meals at my school such as a greek salad in case the feta was made with animal rennet?
The only vegetarian option at my school prom will be spinach and ricotta cannelloni, but how do I know that this meal is actually vegetarian?
It seems many people working at preparing food may not know what goes in to the food during the process, and things could be incorrectly labelled as vegetarian.


Any advice?
Sorry if anything i've written here isn't correct, I chose to follow this diet less than a year ago
Thank you!!!!
I would eat before the prom, and perhaps take a couple of Clif/Lara bars with you, just in case...If you know who the caterer is, give them a call. "I go to Riverdale High School, and you are catering our prom. I would like to know if there is rennet in the spinach/ricotta cannelloni, please." They should be able to check quickly. I hope this helps. Have a great time at Prom.
 
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List of rennet-free cheese here:

http://cheese.joyousliving.com/

http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2008issue3/update_renet.htm

Calf Rennet

Calf rennet has traditionally been the enzyme of choice in cheesemaking. However, between supply problems and animal rights, religious, and food safety issues, calf rennet is now used to make less than 5 percent of all cheese produced in the United States today, according to the WCDR. In other words, approximately 95 percent of all cheese in the United States is made with non-animal-derived rennet.

This would suggest that most vegetarians eat cheese with non-animal rennet irrespective of whether they care or not.
 

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I read on the internet that ricotta is made the same way paneer is and rennet is not needed in this process. But, when I look at the packaging of ricotta tubs in the supermarket, some specify that they are vegetarian and others don't say that they are? This is the same for different brands of feta cheese also, suggesting some brands can confirm they didn't use animal rennet and others cannot, so they can't claim it's vegetarian.


How is it that different brands of the same cheese can say a different thing on the packaging regarding whether they are sutiable for vegetarians or not?

Because of this, i don't know whether to buy meals at my school such as a greek salad in case the feta was made with animal rennet?
The only vegetarian option at my school prom will be spinach and ricotta cannelloni, but how do I know that this meal is actually vegetarian?
It seems many people working at preparing food may not know what goes in to the food during the process, and things could be incorrectly labelled as vegetarian.


Any advice?
Sorry if anything i've written here isn't correct, I chose to follow this diet less than a year ago
Thank you!!!!
Ha, welcome to officially being a vegetarian!

Short answer- No, people don't usually understand what vegetarian is until they're vegetarians themselves. So there are a number of things labelled 'vegetarian' in places like cafes that aren't actually vegetarian (like anything with Parmesan cheese).


Longer answer- Different brands use different ingredients. So, feta and cheddar cheese CAN be vegetarian! But, just like people just because they 'can' be, doesn't mean they will be.

Unless you find out from your cafeteria what brand of cheese they use, you probably won't be able to know for sure whether it's vegetarian or not. Some people prefer to just eat it anyway and hope that it doesn't contain stuff like rennet or tallow. Others, prefer to just not eat anything they don't know beyond reasonable doubt isn't veg. That's up to you to decide for yourself.

You could ask the people catering your prom what cheese is in the ricotta and whether it contains rennet. If they don't know or won't tell you, then I'd opt to just eat before hand. But, by asking you're making them more aware of what 'vegetarian' means and that's a good thing. As long as you're polite in your questions and straightforward about why it's a question you have to ask (because vegetarians don't eat rennet) then you shouldn't have anything to worry about. Plus, it might actually make them realise that 'vegetarian' means more than just 'no meat'.

Good luck!
 
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