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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><b>United Kingdom</b><br><br>
In the United Kingdom, declawing is extremely uncommon, to the extent that most people have never seen a declawed cat. The procedure is considered cruel by almost all British vets, who refuse to perform it except for medical reasons. The "Mutilations report" found in an annex of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons' Guide to Professional Conduct states:<br><br><br><br>
This procedure is only acceptable where, in the opinion of the veterinary surgeon, injury to the animal is likely to occur during normal activity. It is not acceptable if carried out for the convenience of the owner ... the removal of claws, particularly those which are weight-bearing, to preclude damage to furnishings is not acceptable.<br><br><br><br><b>The Animal Welfare Bill, which is currently (autumn 2006) making its way through Parliament, will explicitly prohibit the mutilation of an animal for non-therapeutic reasons, and therefore should this Bill pass into law, declawing for other than therapeutic reasons will become illegal.</b></div>
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The above is excerpted from the Wikipedia entry on Onychectomy (declawing). I am most interested in the outcome of this bill, and kindly request that those VB members living in the UK keep an eye on this issue and provide this thread with an update.<br><br><br><br>
I would also be interested to know if there are countries or municipalities where cat declawing is already illegal, or where outlawing the procedure is being considered or to be considered at a future date.<br><br><br><br>
I let my subscription to Cat Fancy magazine lapse in part because they kept insisting on framing the issue of declawing as a debate, giving the "pro" side the same weight as the "anti" side, and I could no longer accept this.
 

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there's a pro side to declawing? not for the cat I presume. I'm surprised at how common it is here. we get a lot of surrendered cats that are declawed.
 

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Of course. Your couch doesn't end up with ragged arms. Duh.<br><br><br><br>
Wait..my couch DOESN'T have ragged arms. (My loveseat is another story)...<br><br><br><br>
The rescue that I got my fosters (and now some adoptees) from asked potential adopters to please not have the cats declawed, and to please try other methods first. If they absolutely can't NOT declaw, then to please find a vet who will do the laser surgery.<br><br><br><br>
My neighbor's kid who loves my cats said something about how she was going to get one, "But my mom said we have to get the nails out first" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rolleyes:"><br><br><br><br>
I honestly don't understand the big deal about claws. I clip my cats nails. It's easy to do, it takes less than a minute. It leaves them blunt.<br><br>
It takes me like 2 minutes to do all 3 cats. When I had 6 kittens and the mama cat, it took me less than 10 minutes to do all four paws on all 7 cats, and that included finding them and chasing them around.
 

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<span style="font-family:'Comic Sans MS';"><span>I don't live in the UK.<br><br>
My cat is declawed. I didn't want her to be declawed, but it was "for the sake of the furniture." (Keep in mind I was about 10 years old when it happened, so it really wasn't up to me)<br><br>
It was really sad, watching her walk around like that for a few days. It's only temporary pain, but in the long run, it's bad. She has no self defense, and she goes outside a lot.</span></span>
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:"> I'm in the UK, and had never heard of cat declawing before I got access to the internet. Ouch. I'll be watching out for news. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:">
 

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I grew up in the NW of the USA, and before I learned about AR, I'd assumed getting your cat declawed was just as necessary and routine as getting your cat spayed. How sad, when I think back.<br><br><br><br>
What's worse is that I actually had to tell my parent's NOT to get their new(est) cat declawed and had to give them pointers on how to clip her nails. It's just like trimming your dog's nails, except that you have to extend the claws!<br><br><br><br>
If this law passes in the UK, that's AWESOME. Unfortunately, I don't think any such bill is likely in the USA for another 10+ years. :/ Keep working on your younger siblings and nephews/nieces, all in the US!! Someday..
 

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A cat that we rescued from an extremely abusive home was declawed when we got him. He's such a sweet thing. I regret him being declawed, but in all honesty, it doesn't seem to bother him in the least, nor does he even seem to notice. I will never get any of my cats declawed, however. I don't agree with it, because I feel as though if people are going to have animals, then they should be responsible about it. Not, "Oh no- fifi clawed at my couch- I'd better call the vet."<br><br><br><br>
Animals are not humans to modify.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Amy SF</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I would also be interested to know if there are countries or municipalities where cat declawing is already illegal, or where outlawing the procedure is being considered or to be considered at a future date.</div>
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Yes, it's illegal in many countries. That Wikipedia article you quoted lists them.<br><br><br><br>
It's only in North America where declawing is such a widespread phenomenon.<br><br><br><br>
Which reminds me I wanted to call around to all our area vets and find out which ones, if any, refuse to do mutilation surgeries (declawing in cats, tail docking and ear cropping in dogs). These are the vets that we should be supporting, as veterinarians need to be setting the example as well informing patients about the risks and pain involved in such surgeries. We have had several cats turned into our shelter because their owners had them declawed and the cats began the predictable behavior problems (the most common being refusing to use the litter boxes since it's painful/awkward to walk on clay litter after getting your knuckles cut off).
 

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Wow. I wish it were illegal in Canada.<br><br>
My Dad's girlfriend has 3 cats, and none of them are declawed. She thinks it's cruel, and if they scratch her furniture, so what? They live there too. (She's not a vegetarian, but I like the way she treats her cats)
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElliottsMom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
there's a pro side to declawing?</div>
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I'm guessing here: Declawing cats makes them more appealing as pets and as a result more cats may be rescued from shelters.
 

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I worked at a shelter for a year (had to quit because my boss was nuts and I didn't agree with some of the things they did there). They actually did declawing there (which is one thing I ended up hating). I didn't know much about it before I started working there. I watched the surgery being done on one cat. Watching a dog/cat being fixed doesn't bother me at all but watching this cat get declawed made my stomach turn and I felt really sick. They just cut off the ends of their "fingers" and just pile them up next to the cat.<br><br><br><br>
The cats have to go on meds for the pain and often will rip the glue that is holding the paws together and start bleeding all over the place. Many cats personalities changed when they got declawed. They would become very fearful or aggressive because they didn't understand why their "finger tips" had been amputated. Some cats did okay with it but many were brought back to the shelter because the behavioral problems post-declawing were so bad. Poor babies. It is such a stupid and cruel thing to do to an animal. If you're that worried about your furniture maybe you don't need a cat.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>kpickell</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Which reminds me I wanted to call around to all our area vets and find out which ones, if any, refuse to do mutilation surgeries (declawing in cats, tail docking and ear cropping in dogs). These are the vets that we should be supporting, as veterinarians need to be setting the example as well informing patients about the risks and pain involved in such surgeries. We have had several cats turned into our shelter because their owners had them declawed and the cats began the predictable behavior problems (the most common being refusing to use the litter boxes since it's painful/awkward to walk on clay litter after getting your knuckles cut off).</div>
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I tried this and frustratingly couldn't find any, I had to settle for the vets that didn't outright try to sell me a declaw with a spay/neuter. Here there are two practices that ONLY see cats which I would have loved to take ours to, but both list how awesome they are at declawing in their ads. I know one couple who got a cat and when they went to get here spayed the vet talked them into declawing their cat and convinced them it was the best thing in the world for her. After my boyfriend got done talking to them they were pissed but it was a little late for their cat.
 

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<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jeezycreezy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm guessing here: Declawing cats makes them more appealing as pets and as a result more cats may be rescued from shelters.</div>
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That is the reason the shelter gave for declawing the cats. It did help to place some where people already had declawed cats or they just didn't want a cat with claws for various reasons. However, we still got cats back because it changed their personalities. I mean. You go from living in a cage for however long you are at the shelter and then you get your fingertips amputated and then you are thrown into a foreign place where there may be other pets or children and you have no defenses and you're in pain. Sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn't. Poor cats.
 

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<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Aimra</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
it changed their personalities.</div>
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So?
 

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Wow, that's horrible that the shelter was declawing the cats.<br><br><br><br>
I know some vets will declaw because they say it's better to oblige the owners than have the cat turned into a shelter or euthanized.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>kpickell</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Wow, that's horrible that the shelter was declawing the cats.<br><br><br><br>
I know some vets will declaw because they say it's better to oblige the owners than have the cat turned into a shelter or euthanized.</div>
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I agree. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> Our rabbit's vet (the cats have a vet that comes to our home) does cat declawing and when I asked the friend who referred me to them about it he said it's for exactly the reason you stated. I just wish people weren't so disgustingly selfish and shallow. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>meatless</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I just wish people weren't so disgustingly selfish and shallow. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("></div>
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Me too, me too.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElliottsMom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
there's a pro side to declawing?</div>
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Yes, there is. See attached cartoon. One day I'll have this made into a t-shirt for myself.<br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/3/3a/3a069c5b_vbattach4930.gif"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/3/3a/525x525px-LL-3a069c5b_vbattach4930.gif" style="width:525px;height:156px;"></a>
 

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Declawing is mutilation. I'm so glad it was never an option for my cat. I know of people who declawed their cat because it scratched their baby IN IT'S CRIB. What the cat was doing in the crib is another issue, because everyone knows the danger that cats pose to sleeping babies. Says a lot about the parents.
 

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I grew up having cats and had never heard of de-clawing until I married my husband. My MIL has a lot of cats (always about 5 or 6, they tend to come and go <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> ) and she always has them de-clawed. The worst thing is, they go in and out and I'm now wondering if the reason they occasionally "disappear" is that they have no defense for themselves when they're in the wild!<br><br><br><br>
My kitty Sebastian has his claws and it's never been a problem. He loves us and has never hurt any of us, and he doesn't usually bother the furniture. He has scratched my one year old once or twice but honestly he had it coming! Usually I am right there to help him pet the kitty <i>gently</i>, and usually if he gets too rough Sebastian will just run off, but there have been a couple of times where he came upon a sleeping cat and startled him and got a little scratch. Nothing I'm worried about.
 
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