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Does anyone have a good recommendation of a vegan car wax. I bought a new (used but new to us) car and I want to stay on top of waxing it. The problem is I do not want to use a wax that is derived form any animal based ingredients, as well as petroleum or other non-renewable resources.

Any ideas???
 

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Good question, I was going to ask about this, too! I hope someone responds...

OK, I found this recipie for making your own, maybe we could tweek it a little and use soy wax?

1/2 cup melted ceresin wax

2 tbsp melted yellow beeswax

2 cups turpentine

1 tbsp pine oil

In a double boiler, heat the ceresin wax and beeswax. Stir, then allow to cool just until the mixture starts to harden. Stir in the turpentine and pine oil. To use, apply with a rag: polish with a soft cloth.

NOTE: To avoid overdrying, wax your car one section at a time.
 

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Every recepie I have seen for homemade car wax has beeswax. I'm not sure what could be subsituted for beeswax that is o.k. to use on cars. Maybe some sort of hemp wax?
 

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I have seen some commercial carunuba (sp?) waxes that say how they use all these plant based things, but I don't know what else may be in them. And what is ceresin?
 

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Caranuba, the traditional wax, is plant matter. Old favorites like Simoniz were caranuba mixed with solvents like mineral spirits. Perhaps other waxes were mixed in, tho i seem to remember seeing some waxes being described as being "all caranuba." Bowling alley wax is similar. Caranuba is reputed to be the best, strongest, most protective, plant-origin wax. Cheaper waxes have beeswax or petroleum waxes such as parrafin wax or ceresin wax mixed in, to make it easier to spread or whatever, and to make the product cheaper. Ceresin is, I think, simply a kind of parrafin wax, optimized for use as a long-lasting coating wax for cars, furniture, etc.

Newer "waxes" are often not really waxes at all, but are petroleum derived polymers and mixtures of such. Many "cleaner-waxes" have a small amount of fine polishing abrasive mixed in. This takes off paint, but only very slightly. You can "polish" the car zillions of times before you polish all the paint off. You can also by "polishing compound which has lots of abrasive, and which cannot be used too frequently as it takes off too much paint." They are used as a final polishing after new paint has dried, and been rubbed down with wet-dry abrasive paper first, i think -- I don't remember my body-shop and car painting days too well.
 

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soilman has it pretty right

why not buff the car once and then never have to really do it again?

my body & fender teacher's car has been heavily buffed once (4 years ago) and washed hundreds of times and never been waxed and the paint job is still beautiful and shiny

we just did a camero at school too, and it came out great, and theres no reason to wax it

i guess if i cared about my car i would probably buff it and then use a light glaze for extra shine

on used cars, especially from dealerships & used car lots, you wanna stay away from any harsh abrasives since they prolly used a too harsh compound before you bought to make it all shiny

the only thing about buffing is that if the car has lots of door dings or dents, buffing it out will make them show up a lot more

Caroline
 
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