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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I've been seeing commercials for cheese (Cracker Barrel, I think) and in the commercial they say something like:<br>
"And because it's real Canadian dairy, there are no growth hormones or antibiotics."<br><br>
It got me wondering what was considered normal for dairy farms in Canada. I know that most of the information I've seen on the dairy industry has been in articles and documentaries that were talking about American farms in particular, and that in the states, these things are common place. I had assumed that the Canadian and American dairy industries would be very similar, if not identical. Do the animals in these two countries really get treated differently?<br><br>
If anyone knows of any resources specifically for factory farming in Canada, I'd be very interested. This information would never change my personal buying/eating habits, but if there is a noticeable difference then I would like to be aware so that I can at least have my facts right when discussing these topics with other people.
 

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I don't know about specifics, but because we have more space for farms, I don't think we have nearly the overcrowding problem. As far as the growth hormones and anitbiotics, if this was true, wouldn't all Canadian milk be organic? Whenever I drive by the high school and all the girls are a foot taller than me with their larger breasts, I think "Yep, it's the hormones" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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Canada has horrendous standards for how animals are treated. In some cases, it's even worse than the U.S. (maybe not in the case of hormones or antibiotics, but that's one issue among many). The Canadian animal agribusiness greatly exaggerates what is and isn't standard practice in Canada. It's illegal to use artificial growth hormone in dairy, but it's still legal to use hormones in cows raised for meat (this is also legal in the U.S. but probably banned in the EU). Also, if you're concerned with factory farming in Canada, this is just one look into how cows are treated in Canada:<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Canada is a top exporter of cattle and beef, although Canadians like eating cows themselves, consuming 49.4 pounds per capita in 2001. Cows raised for beef may range in fields for part of their lives before confinement in feedlots, where they are fattened on an unnatural grain diet prior to transport to slaughter. Although less-painful methods exist to mark ownership, branding their flesh with a red-hot iron is still considered acceptable; government-run websites such as Alberta's Livestock Identification Service provide instructions on branding and castration by cutting off testicles with knives, crushing blood vessels with clamps or cutting blood supply to testicles with rubber rings, a procedure banned in some European countries.<br><br>
(excerpt from <i>About Canada: Animal Rights</i> by John Sorenson)</div>
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In terms of transportation legislation, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency allows cows transported for slaughter to go up to 52 hours without food, water, or rest. I think cows can be transported for up to 28 hours in the U.S. (or 36 hours upon request), and 14 hours in Europe before they're at least provided with water. Of course, I disagree with the exploitation of animals regardless of country or continent. This is just to show how there's nothing to boast about in terms of regulation in Canada. There needs to be more animal rights organizations in Canada, more awareness about animal right issues pertinent to Canada, and more Canadians fighting for change.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Limes</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3042517"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't know about specifics, but because we have more space for farms, I don't think we have nearly the overcrowding problem.</div>
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What? The factory farms in Canada are hardly concerned about providing additional space for non-human animals. Where's the profit in that?<br><br>
"An estimated 98 per cent of Canadas 26 million egg-laying hens are kept in small, cramped 'battery' cages where they are unable to perform natural behaviours such as nesting, perching, dust-bathing, stretching a wing or walking around activities that are important to them. Each bird has less space than a sheet of notebook paper. Hens are forced to stand on sloping wire floors, and they suffer feather loss and skin damage due to constant rubbing against the cage and cage-mates."<br><br><a href="http://www.humanefood.ca/battery.html" target="_blank">http://www.humanefood.ca/battery.html</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for posting that information, I really appreciate it. I wasn't expecting to hear that the animals were really treated better and lived better lives, but I think it's best to know the truth. Differences between countries are just a part of that.
 

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No problem. I don't think it's really other vegans who try to present it in that manner, it's more so the Canadian dairy, egg and meat industries. In terms of more information about factory farming in Canada, there are a few resources. Not nearly as much as you'd find in the U.S. unfortunately (although some of the U.S. based organizations are still active in major Canadian cities). But here are at least a few of the organizations:<br><br><a href="http://www.humanefood.ca/" target="_blank">Canadian Coalition for Farm Animals</a><br><br>
Promotes buying "organic" or "free-range" meat, dairy, eggs, etc. so that's disappointing (at least for me), but there's still a lot of information on factory farm practices in Canada and a few undercover investigations.<br><br><a href="http://www.cetfa.com/" target="_blank">Canadians for the Ethical Treatment of Food Animals</a><br><br>
Responsible for many undercover investigations, updates relating to the treatment of farm animals in Canada, and information on investigating livestock auctions (as well as resources on how to find livestock auctions in your area). They're also part of a Canadian documentary titled <i>Revealed: No Country for Animals</i>, which might be posted somewhere on the website, but can also be viewed <a href="http://www.cultureunplugged.com/play/6643/No-Country-for-Animals" target="_blank">here</a> if you're interested.<br><br><a href="http://liberationbc.org/" target="_blank">Liberation BC</a><br><br>
I'm not from BC, but there's also information posted about factory farming here (under "publications"). This is one of the best organizations in Canada, IMO. There's an updated blog on animal issues, and they're concerned with the exploitation of animals across the board. I like that they're more focused on vegan advocacy, and they seem far more oriented towards animal rights. The "resources" page on their website is very informative too, I have it bookmarked.<br><br><a href="http://animalvoices.ca/" target="_blank">Animal Voices</a><br><br>
This is a really great podcast that covers many different animal issues, including topics on factory farming. This is based in Canada as well.<br><br>
As for literature, there's the book <a href="http://www.amazon.ca/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.ca%2FAnimal-Rights-John-Sorenson%2Fdp%2F1552663566" target="_blank"><i>About Canada: Animal Rights</i></a> by John Sorenson that I mentioned earlier. There's also <a href="http://www.amazon.ca/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.ca%2FBlood-Relations-Animals-Humans-Politics%2Fdp%2F1896357393%2F" target="_blank"><i>Blood Relations: Animals, Humans, and Politics</i></a> by Charlotte Montgomery (which I haven't read) and a few others I'm sure. Of course, there's a lot of books out there on animal rights philosophy, which tend to be more universally applicable. But I think reading about specific animal issues in Canada is important as well, and I agree with you that it's helpful to know what happens here.
 
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