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I'm so confused as what is the true definition of vegetarianism because I've been researching this past week for the true definition and it varies by location and people's belief. I'm so confused!!!

here are the definitions I've come across.

lacto ovo vegetarianism - A person who does not consume animal flesh and by products except for Dairy and Eggs. Does this also mean any dairy products regardless of rennet, pepsin, etc. or does it mean any dairy with out animal enzymes?

Lacto vegetarianism - person who does not consume animal flesh and by products including eggs except for dairy products.

ovo vegetarianism - Person who does not consume animal flesh and by products including dairy, but they do consume eggs.

vegetarianism definition 1 - Person who does not eat any animal flesh and by products. It means no dairy or eggs.

vegetarianism definition 2 - The definition of lacto-ovo vegetarianism

veganism definition 1 - Person who does not eat any animal flesh and by products and apply it to their lifestyle meaning they don't use any product with animal byproducts example: toothpaste, soap, lotion may have glycerin a product that can be derived from animals.

veganism definition 2 - definition of the vegetarianism definition 1.

Ok and another question if honey is an animal by product why do people still consume it? Does it have a name like lacto ovo vegetarianism like honey vegetarianism?

Randomness:: Please ignore. I'm just very happy and excited. Yay there's a health food store several blocks away from my house with enormous amount of stock for vegetarians/vegans. Omg :3 yay
 

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I think that just about everybody has their own set of rules. I think the BASIC idea of vegetarianism is only no MEAT. Everything else goes. I have actually talked to people who believe this. Most people, though, seem to think no meat, no anything that an animal HAS to be killed for. Hence no rennet, no gelatin, no meat, but eggs and dairy would be ok. Vegan would be the same, but no dairy and eggs.

People will also say that a vegan will use no animal stuff elsewhere, not just their diet, but I don't think that is specific to vegans. There are lots of vegetarians with the same idea.

There's a thread about his somewhere, I'll try to find it for you.
 

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For me:

'vegetarian' can mean either a) generally anyone who doesn't eat meat (incl. fish) or meat byproducts b) specifically a lacto-ovo-vegetarian

Vegan: don't use animal products
 

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I was just wondering if people think not using fur, leather, etc. is something vegans do, not vegetarians.

ETA: Sorry, yeah. I didn't make that too clear in the first question.
 

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Well avoiding fur, leather etc. is compatible with vegetarianism but not required by it, like it is by veganism.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nookle View Post

Most people, though, seem to think no meat, no anything that an animal HAS to be killed for. Hence no rennet, no gelatin, no meat, but eggs and dairy would be ok.
This pretty much defines the lacto-ovo vegetarian diet for me. Years ago, all the lacto ovo veg's that I knew also extended this to clothing. Therefore, leather would not be acceptable, but wool would be okay. I don't see this so much lately. *shrug*
 

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VEGETARIAN, loosely speaking, is someone who doesn't eat meat (that's any animal flesh, including fish and seafood). A more careful definition means no products from slaughtered animals (broth, gelatin, rennet, etc.)

VEGAN means striving to use no animal products at all.

Vegans are necessarily vegetarian, but the word "vegetarian" is sometimes used in contrast with "vegan" to mean a vegetarian who is not vegan.

It should also be pointed out that within each category, there are some people who are much more careful/consistent/motivated than others. Hence there are vegetarians who may not attend to whether cheese has animal rennet, for example, and eat it anyway. Likewise, different vegans will draw the line in different places about what it means for something to be an "animal product".
 

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I consider myself lacto-ovo, but will not use leather, fur, wool, or anything else. In clothes, cosmetics, cleaning products. No animal testing, either. So I guess the only animal product in my life (apart from the litterbox) is eggs and some dairy. But even that is organic, free run.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggiejanie View Post

Gelatin and rennet aren't products... they are parts of the animals, correct?
I think they would go under the heading "meat byproduct" though, they're probably byproducts of the slaughtering of animals for meat. I'm not sure though.

But I feel confident that "animal product" means all products that are of animal origin, not things that an animal has produced while alive. Meat is an animal product just like dairy.
 

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Eh, to me, it's still the part of the animal, just that it's not always the flesh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia View Post

which is created by prolonged boiling of connective tissue such as skin, cartilage, and bones
ETA: Thanks for the explanation, SS.
 
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