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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!<br><br>
It's nearly my summer break from uni and I'm planning to do some volenteering over the summer. I haven't contacted anyone yet but I have looked at a lot of places and like the idea of helping cleaning for cats in rescue centres and helping walk dogs for rescue dog centres.<br><br>
The thing is I've never walked a dog. Will is be a problem? I mean... is it something you can be bad at? Any dog owners with advice would be great!<br><br>
Also if anyone has done anything similar and can give any advice that would be cool too, I don't know what advice I would need but just if anything springs to mind <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
It probally sounds silly but if they just let me loose on them I'm worried I'll do something wrong !<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"> thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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It's pretty easy. The only problem you might come across is if a dog is really big and tries to pull you. Or a dog that wants to stop every six feet, sniff, and pee on something. The reason to walk dogs is to get them exercise, and sometimes give them a chance to pee/poo.
 

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Most places should have a more experienced person available to train you. You could ask about this -- if they are going to just turn you loose, maybe you can pick a different rescue. I would just be upfront about your lack of dog walking experience, and they should give you some instruction and answer any questions. If they have any particularly difficult/large/strong dogs, they probably won't give them to you right away. Just speak up if you're feeling uncomfortable about anything.<br><br>
I've only done a little work with a rescue group, but it's a very rewarding thing to do!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>RunnerVeggie</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2907201"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Most places should have a more experienced person available to train you. You could ask about this -- if they are going to just turn you loose, maybe you can pick a different rescue. I would just be upfront about your lack of dog walking experience, and they should give you some instruction and answer any questions. If they have any particularly difficult/large/strong dogs, they probably won't give them to you right away. Just speak up if you're feeling uncomfortable about anything.<br><br>
I've only done a little work with a rescue group, but it's a very rewarding thing to do!</div>
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I agree (and have a similar experience).<br><br>
One thing I will mention though about large dogs is that you should be careful about how you hold the leash. You want to keep a good grip on the dog but you don't want to break your wrist if a large dog pulls too hard too quickly. I tend to prefer to walk dogs, even little ones, with two hands and short leashes (4-6 feet). One hand on the end of the leash and the leash goes across the front of my body with the other hand holding on there. That way the dog stays closer and we're both more secure.<br><br>
A lot of people like to give dogs a long lead, but the problem is physics. A longer lead means that if the dog bolts (towards a squirrel or another dog) there's more chance to build momentum, making the force at both ends of the leash stronger than if the leash were shorter, which hurts both you and the dog. In my opinion, walking on-leash should be done with a short lead and "freedom" should be given at a dog park or other safe space where the dog can go off-leash. The half-way measures with long leashes or retractible leashes are just a pain (literally).
 

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Used to own a St Bernard so have some experience with large animals (!)<br><br><b>You are in charge</b> and most animals know it-but they are all different-most issues happen when meeting other dogs-it's all about territory in that regard most females dogs are easier to handle.
 

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I agree with Elaine on using a shorter (no more than 6') leash. You can be pulled right off your feet using a retractable if the pup gets to the end of it and keeps pullling, bad news. I suspect a shelter would have some sort of new volunteer orientation before they let you handle any pups or kitties. The rescue I volunteer for (long distance doing behind the scenes work as they are in another state) has orientation and training before you can walk any of our orphans or volunteer at one of the adoption events. I agree with RunnerVeggie about being upfront in explaining your lack of experience but enthusiasm to learn and help out. The orphaned kitties and pups will appreciate you so much.<br><br>
I walk three boisterous (and one low key senior) woofers every day; it's a great time to bond with the companion furkids.
 

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They like to mark their territory, probably even if it's the first time around the neighborhood. They want to pee on every street sign pole.<br><br>
I piss on the door handles of every Cadillac and SUV, so I'm not all that different.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Empty_Shell</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2907246"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
They like to mark their territory, probably even if it's the first time around the neighborhood. They want to pee on every street sign pole.<br><br>
I piss on the door handles of every Cadillac and SUV, so I'm not all that different.</div>
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<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Empty_Shell</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2907246"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
They like to mark their territory, probably even if it's the first time around the neighborhood. They want to pee on every street sign pole.</div>
</div>
<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:">
 

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Hold on tight and don't let go of the leash no matter what. Nothing worse than losing a dog while on a walk!<br><br>
But just tell the shelter that you've never walked a dog but would like to and they'll match you up with an easy dog. Some dogs are horrible at walking on a leash. Others are really nice. It's not always the size of the dog that matters, but generally speaking it is a lot easier to walk a smaller dog.
 

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Stumbled across this. Not a big fan of the choke collars, and despite what it says, I prefer a harness. I don't imagine being dragged around by your neck to be much fun. Otherwise, there is some good advice in there...<br><br><a href="http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/articles/dogwalk.htm" target="_blank">http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/articles/dogwalk.htm</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Aww thanks guys, I feel a bit better now. I'll be nice and clear upfront that I don't have any experience <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> and hold on tight! I'll ring up in the next few days. Thanks for all your replies!
 
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