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I am curious, what is your opinion of being able to burn your garbage instead of sending it off to the landfill? We used to live in the country, where it was legal for us to do this, but since we live in the city, we cannot do it anymore. I have to talked to some people that say it is worse to burn it because of the pollutants it puts in the air. I have also talked to people that want to move out to the country just so that they can do these sort of things. Just curious.
 

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hmmm, I live in a small town, and people love to burn stuff. Since we recycle almost everything, our only garbage is some kinds of plastic, and dust and drier lint. Drier lint is a good fire starter.<br><br>
I don't know which is the lesser of two evils, because burning plastic is obviously polluting the air, but the alternative is to bury it and pollute the earth. It's a catch 22. The best thing I guess is to use less.<br><br>
We don't burn our garbage because it would stink, but it is legal to do so here.
 

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I think that incineration is a good solution. For those of you who don't know, that is where they burn your trash and then use the energy from burning for things like electricity. I took a waste management class a couple of years ago and a group of us were assigned to do this big research project where we actually visited an incinerator and did this big presentation and stuff. They have standards about the amount of air pollution that is given off by this process and they have solutions such as scrubbers and other methods to vastly reduce the pollution given off.<br><br><br><br>
Off the top of my head I can't remember what the current air pollution standards are in Long Beach, CA (where the plant was) but obviously they are fairly stringent.<br><br><br><br>
I know that incineration isn't too popular at the moment, but maybe in the future it may be a good solution. I guess this is burning garbage on a large scale. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I just know that landfills are disgusting. We visited one of those too and got the tour and everything and the amount of trash they bring in there is amazing. It really opens your eyes to the amount of waste we generate.
 

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You should reduce wast to a minimum and don't burn it yourself.<br><br><br><br>
Waste burners, burn the waste at a high temperature so toxic stuff is broken down as good as possible.<br><br><br><br>
If you burn it yourself (in the open) the temperature of the fire is too low for that.
 

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Hi everybody:<br><br><br><br>
Im a Bolivian Civil engineer and today I have started to work for an american company who focus on green and lean construction, I have been told to find out how a burning garbage process is done, so we may improve it here as a prototype.<br><br><br><br>
please if you have some info on burning garbage, or anaerobic decomposition of garbage, please send it tome, I will be so happy.<br><br><br><br><a href="mailto:eek:[email protected]">[email protected]</a><br><br><br><br>
tks guys
 

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I live in a little town (1000 people) and here we don't have garbage pickup. You take it to the dump yourself, but they have a guy (we call him the Garbage Nazi) and he checks every load that comes in to make sure recyclables are in one bag and anything not recyclable is in a different bag. As well, you are not allowed to throw away anything compostable, you have to compost it yourself.<br><br><br><br>
In the larger town next to us, they pick up compostable stuff, garden waste, kitchen scraps, etc. , compost if over the winter and then in the spring, sell it back to gardeners.<br><br><br><br>
Because of the miserable winters here, we store our garbage through the winter and just do a dump run twice a year, spring and fall. I would say that 2/3 or our trailer load this spring was recyclable stuff. Lots of plastic, some aluminum cans and then things like cereal boxes. Just think if this stuff had been burnt instead. All that plastic, melting, burning, drifting up into the air for everyone to breath.<br><br><br><br>
As far as landfills go, if it was as segregated as ours here is, when it was "full", you could put a park on top of it maybe. Near Surrey, BC there was a huge dump and now years later, with the grass over it, you can't even tell it's there.
 

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It depends entirely on what you're burning and the amount of toxics that you'd be putting into the atmosphere by burning it. I wouldn't burn anything that has any plastic in it personally.
 
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>greenconcepts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hi everybody:<br><br><br><br>
Im a Bolivian Civil engineer and today I have started to work for an american company who focus on green and lean construction, I have been told to find out how a burning garbage process is done, so we may improve it here as a prototype.<br><br><br><br>
please if you have some info on burning garbage, or anaerobic decomposition of garbage, please send it tome, I will be so happy.<br><br><br><br><a href="mailto:eek:[email protected]">[email protected]</a><br><br><br><br>
tks guys</div>
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spambots are gonna love you, oliver barreto. you're gonna have more viagra offers and nigerian royalty needing your help than you know what to do with, by the end of the week. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/worried.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":worried:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Dieselsmom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
(we call him the Garbage Nazi)</div>
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What does that mean? I've never heard that term before.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>rainforests1</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What does that mean? I've never heard that term before.</div>
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Do you remember the "soup Nazi" on the old Seinfeld program. He was totally controlling and in your face, and decided if you got soup or not (even though he was a restaurant owner) and as likely as not would kick you out if you displeased him? That's why we call our garbage guy the Garbage Nazi, because if you forget to seperate your recyclabes or try to slip something compostable into your garbage bag, he'll refuse it and send you packing til you get it corrected. He's a little Hitler and we're very careful not to displease him.
 

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With all the information, opinions, and "facts" I've found all over the internet about burning your own garbage vs. sending it off to the landfill in a garbage truck, I am torn between what is right, best, or better... We do recycle tons of stuff. Waste Management picks up paper, plastic, metal, glass, etc., and we don't even have to sort it anymore (supposedly the people at the recycling place do that themselves, some sorting by machine and some by hand...however I have heard that even some of that gets tossed into the garbage heap if it gets overlooked in the process..). But then there's still the stuff that really doesn't qualify for recycling and is burnable. We live right on the edge of a small-ish town...you need a permit to burn here, and we have a small burning pit in our backyard. The neighbors don't seem to mind, unless somebody accidentally burns something that makes lots of black smoke. The recyclers won't take stuff like pizza boxes or any packaging that had foody residues stuck to it. For an environmentally-conscious person or family who made the effort not to produce too much trash, this would really not leave much garbage left once the recylclables had been properly sorted out. Unfortunately, I live in a house full of guys (my boyfriend rents our extra rooms out to some single friends) who like to eat fast food, eat on the run, etc. and unfortunately this involves a lot of messy wrappers and packages that really can't be put in the recycling bin. We burn these types of things. Does anyone have an opinion about this situation? Yes, I SHOULD get on the boys about producing less trash and showing them how much waste they/we are producing. HOWEVER, this fact aside, I would like to know what others think about burning non-recyclable, non-compostable items as opposed to having it picked up by waste management and sent to the landfill to do their thing.... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wall.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":wall:">
 

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I have heard so many sides of waste disposal that I don't know what to believe any more. If you burn your garbage, then it won't take up any space, but it will give off air toxins. If you recycle, not as much will be sent to the dump, but the process uses a lot of energy and dangerous chemicals; most of the recycleables will be sent back to the dump. I guess the best thing to do is waste less in the first place.<br><br><br><br>
My town has a local compost for grass clipings, wood chips, and human sewage. Gardeners can go whenever they want and can either buy bags of the compost or bring their own barrels or buckets and take it home for free. This year was the first year my family took advantage of it, since we just started a vegetable garden this year (my back is still sore from tilling). We also brought in reused Kaikoman barrels for rain collecting and water storage.
 

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We recycle what we can, dump the rest minimally (two 33 gallon cans per 5-6 weeks is our average) and burn what's left over that's able to be burned.<br><br><br><br>
I can't tell you the last time we've fired up the [garbage] pit.
 

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Depends where you live. Morons burning things off is has cost many people their lives and countess millions in property damage, and that's excluding the damage to wildlife and the environment. Bushfires are too much of a danger to let any half-bred wally get out in the yard with rubbish and matches.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">But then there's still the stuff that really doesn't qualify for recycling and is burnable. We live right on the edge of a small-ish town...you need a permit to burn here, and we have a small burning pit in our backyard. The neighbors don't seem to mind, unless somebody accidentally burns something that makes lots of black smoke. The recyclers won't take stuff like pizza boxes or any packaging that had foody residues stuck to it.</div>
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Food-contaminated cardboard (like pizza boxes) can be composted.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Unfortunately, I live in a house full of guys (my boyfriend rents our extra rooms out to some single friends) who like to eat fast food, eat on the run, etc. and unfortunately this involves a lot of messy wrappers and packages that really can't be put in the recycling bin. We burn these types of things. Does anyone have an opinion about this situation?</div>
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See above.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">HOWEVER, this fact aside, I would like to know what others think about burning non-recyclable, non-compostable items as opposed to having it picked up by waste management and sent to the landfill to do their thing.... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wall.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":wall:"></div>
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Landfilling is probably less polluting than burning.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Joe</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Landfilling is probably less polluting than burning.</div>
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Indeed, and modern landfills are built in such a way that the garbage can't pollute the soil. As the garbage rots, gas is produced in the process which is collected, and used for energy production. However, not all landfills are modern like the ones described above.<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, if you can have the trash collected, then by no means burn it yourself. Let the pros handle it, they do a much better job, and the energy generated in process is quite valuable. Don't resort to practices that belong in the past.<br><br><br><br>
As for people who still think recycled materials are still dumped, think again. Recycled materials are worth money, and are sold as recources. If they are dumped, then they're throwing money away, and they're paying money to do so.
 
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