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I like them. Pretty much every time I go shopping, they are standing with their signs at the store entrances. I always give them $2, because I could purchase a meal for that. However, my $ has no strings attached...if they want to buy alcohol with the money, that is their choice.<br><br><br><br>
With many charities, you don't know where the money goes, or how much really gets to the needy. When I give a bum 2 bucks, I know he or she gets it all. I have never had a bad experience, such as Kreeli. I have been lucky.<br><br><br><br>
If I didn't have children, I would consider taking some of these people home with me, to give them real help...but I can not risk my kids, of course. I just hate to think of people actually sleeping outside, cold and uncomfortable every night. I mean, my dogs have a house...
 

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There is a lot of information about panhandling and panhandlers at:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://4homeless.hypermart.net/panhandler.html" target="_blank">http://4homeless.hypermart.net/panhandler.html</a>
 

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When I can afford it I will give the change I have or what not. Sometimes in leiu of money I'll go with them into a store and buy them a sandwitch or whatever. I actually had a bad experience with a popular sub sandwich place that bills it's food as a good way to lose weight over doing this. The manager said he didn't want the person to be in the store. I asked why and the responce basically was he's unclean and he smells. I asked if we could get a sandwich and eat it else where. The answer was still no. The man was not being loud or beligerant or anything. Yes, his hygine wasn't the greatest but it wasn't so bad he was really bothring anyone. At least no one seemed to mind he was there. At this point the manager said he was going to call the police if we didn;t leave because we were creating a disturbance. I'm not sure how standing in line and asking why we couldn;t be served is a disturbance though. We left and went across the street and ate on the patio of a pizza place that serves medium pizzas with 1 topping for $5. I don't eat at that particular sub place anymore anymore. Sides it's a chain and i would rather go to the small fast food places where the owners or the people who work there know your name.<br><br>
I have in the past taken people I have gotten to know well working with FNB home for a hot meal, a place to sleep, a shower and to wash their clothes. It's been pretty interesting to get insights into what it's like living on the streets or in squats and what they think of various things going on in the news.
 

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Are you sure they're homeless? I'd be wary if they had a sign.<br><br>
And sometimes giving cash to a homeless person only compounds their problems.<br><br><br><br>
But at any rate, I work at a homeless shelter. It's a lot of fun.
 

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I rarely (never) give money to a streetperson. Whether or not they are buying food or not, I just don't feel good about the money thing. When I lived downtown I ate out almost every night, and I almost always made a concious effort to leave enough food for a take-home to give to a streetperson.<br><br><br><br>
One time my then-girlfriend ordered an Unos pizza but it was so big she had a ****load of it left. I said "we'll take it home" meaning I'll just give it to someone, but while I was in the bathroom she threw it out because it was pepperoni and shew knew that I, of course, wouldn't eat it. When I told her what I was going to do with it she cried, so the waiter had a small pizza made for her to give to a streetperson.
 

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I was a bit naive in my teen years and had a lot of homeless friends way older than me. Luckily, they were good people. One time I made chocolate chip pancakes and snuck out early in the morning to give it to them. They had the coolest place a homeless person could have I think. It was in the trees off the side of the riverbed with stepping stones strategically hidden leading up to their "living quarters". When you got there, they had a tent, some little shelves with canned goods on them, a campfire with pots and pans. It's like they were camping. Of course it wasn't like the easy life for them or anything, but they had it made compaired to others. My friends and I would hang out with them whenever we saw them, and sometimes get drunk by the campfire....yes, underage. It was pretty surreal though.
 

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One of the best parties ever went to was out in the woods up in Oregon. They had DJ's, a few kegs of Deshutes and a nice toasty bonfire. It was cool.
 

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signs i've seen have usually been made from thrown out cardboard boxes and whatever they could find to write on it. i have no problem with people using signs, it generally means they don't have to ask out loud which is what bothers some people.<br><br><br><br>
anyway i kinda dislike the use of the word 'bum', i think homeless people are no less 'decent' or less worthy of respect because of the way they have to or choose to live, and i find 'bum' is usually used like an insult or derogatory name. could just be me though <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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When I was about 21 I met a 14-year old girl, and her just slightly younger sister, and their father, plus the father's new wife, and their little baby girl, when they were all just camping out on someone's property who let them stay there for awhile no-charge, because the family didn't have a real home to live in. Txxxx lived in an old abandoned half-sized school bus, with her 13-or so year old sister. Her father and the wife and the baby lived in tent. I got to know them a little bit. I had a guitar and I sang and the 14-year old asked for information about how to play the guitar, and I gave her some information. She is now a famous entertainer. Singer-songwriter-guitar-player. Must be about 48 now. Possibly more like 46. I think perhaps she may have exaggerated her age when she said she was 14. She looked younger.
 

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Hey. i have never given any money to homeless people before. i have only seen a few of them; I don't live in any big citys like Chicago or Las Vegas where there would be any. I always see them in Chicago and only once where I live. The guy was outside WalMart in a wheelchair he had one leg and had a sign that said "Will work for food". And in the newspaper my mom had told me about how there had been a lady that picked him up and he wouldnt do any work. So she stood out there with a sign by him that said "No he won't" and got in trouble for it. I just thought it was funny. Well I would probably give a homeless person money if they came up and asked me and if I had money on me at the time. I would feel bad if I didn't.
 

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*almost starts to cry* My faaaaavorite place is Highland Park... its the most notorious neighborhood in my town, and last year over Spring Break I went on a college-sponsored service-learning trip down there. The "learning" part of the trip certainly happened for me. I don't think I've EVER learned so much about humility and not judging people as I did that week. I've been back since then, and each time I just want to hug the kids who come to the outreach center, and I don't want to let them go. Especially 7-year-old Paris, her 9-year-old sister LaLa, and their 12-year-old brother David. They're not homeless, but they're certainly living in the red-light-and-food-stamps district. Certainly I am inadequate to fix all problems, but I intend to do what I can.<br><br><br><br>
I've never given money to a homeless person. Most of the time when I see homeless people in my town, I'm in a vehicle going somewhere. I remember being shocked as an 11-year-old visiting Washington D.C. and being asked for money. My parents always ignored them and walked on.<br><br><br><br>
My dad was on a business trip to Cincinnati a few years ago (we lived there 15 years ago), and he told me this story when he got back. He walked out of the conference center, and this man was sitting on the steps to the center. This man was unkempt in appearance and had a brown paper bag with what appeared to be a bottle in it. The man asked my dad for money, and my dad asked the man what he would do with it. The man said he would buy food, and my dad asked him if he was sure he wouldn't buy beer with it. The man lifted up the bag and said, "No, I wouldn't buy beer. See, I already have some." My dad asked him if he would like to go eat lunch at a nearby restaurant, and the man said, "No, just give me money." He didn't get any money out of my dad.
 

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You have a very interesting dad, skylark. Sounds like you are very fortunate. Many people have good parents. But some of us have had parents that are just not working on all 8 cylinders, and rather than being helped by them, we had to figure out how to survive <b>despite</b> the crazy things they did.
 

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Soilman,<br><br>
I know, my dad's great most of the time. I'm proud of him. :)
 

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i think a lot of places are hesitant to serve homeless people, afraid they'd scare off customers etc, so i would actually feel better buying food for someone than giving them money. i think it's just easier for them, if they intended to buy food in the first place<br><br>
but i always want to give money to squeegy (sp?) kids cause they're working for it. i've seen some out on the coldest days of the year with very little to keep them warm, working for a couple of bucks. i saw one wearing brand new Randy River shorts once though and it was obvious that he was playing up his appearance otherwise to look desperate. he wore mismatched socks and a dirty shirt, but those shorts gave him away, they were new and spotless, and Randy River is certainly not the cheapest place to buy shorts. i suspect that if we looked at his friend's socks they'd be an identical mismatched pair lol
 

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LF,<br><br>
That happened to me in DC, too-- the beggers were wearing some name brand clothing. Sure, they might have been donated items, but not likely.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by skylark</i><br><br><b>LF,<br><br>
That happened to me in DC, too-- the beggers were wearing some name brand clothing.</b></div>
</div>
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They could have been local politicians, or Washington Wizards basketball players. Either way, still scum.
 

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<a href="http://thehomelessguy.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">http://thehomelessguy.blogspot.com/</a><br><br><br><br>
I've been reading this guys blog for awhile now. He uses the computer at the local library to keep it up. He's educated, just had a bunch of bad breaks in life. If you'd like to know it from a homeless persons point of view read on.
 

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From the blog:<br><br>
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Giving up on life is what occupies the minds of most homeless people. That is why homelessness and suicide are so similar. Taking one's own life is much harder to do than people may think. Being homeless is the next best thing.<br><br>
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I think this is bull****. False stereotype?<br><br><br><br>
I was homeless for several months, and all i could think of the whole time was how to find a place to live and get the money to afford a decent place to live.<br><br><br><br>
Eventually i found a way, but it was a poor way. I had a home, but was even unhappier there than I was being homeless -- where my main problem was malnutrition not depression. Living in a house, with someone I couldn't stand -- that's when I got depressed.
 
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