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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two British sisters, Mary and Jean, will be visiting Nashville April 3 through 16. (Actually, they will be making a side-trip to Pittsburg on April 10 through 13). They have been here a number of times before, and I met them when they were here in November of 2001.

The sisters belong to an organization called Lifelines (originally founded in Cambridge, England) that seeks to encourage people to correspond with Death-Row prisoners here in the US, and provide them with some emotional support.

There is more information about the organization here:

http://www.geocities.com/lifelinesabol/test2.html

and here:

http://www.lifelines.org/

I am trying to put together some opportunities for them to dine out and to meet the people in our veg*n community here. But it has been hard to get definite answers through e-mail about what their exact schedule is. They are both lacto-vegetarians.

At any rate, does anyone have any ideas about what would be appropriate to do for or with our visitors while they are here?

Both sisters are from Scotland, although they now live and work in London. (Mary was appalled that our principal river here is the Cumberland, named after the Duke of Cumberland. This is about like naming a river after Vlad the Impaler, at least from a Scottish perspective.)
 

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Do you think that they should do things related to their cause, or maybe it would be better for them to just do some fun stuff, to allow them to freshen their minds for the work they are there to do. Nashville is a uniquely American city with all of the musical roots, I imagine that something to do with that would be culturally very interesting and educational. It could be with your group of veg*ns. I am not sure if this is what you are asking, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Thalia

Do you think that they should do things related to their cause, or maybe it would be better for them to just do some fun stuff, to allow them to freshen their minds for the work they are there to do. Nashville is a uniquely American city with all of the musical roots, I imagine that something to do with that would be culturally very interesting and educational. It could be with your group of veg*ns. I am not sure if this is what you are asking, though.
Well, I just don't know. I left the question open to any possible suggestions. Yes, I could take them out to various clubs, but I am not sure that that is what they would be interested in doing.

Plus, if that is what they are interested in doing, their friends in the anti-death penalty groups here would be as good at doing that as I. I am not dismissing that idea, just trying to figure out what is best.

The home of President Andrew Jackson, the Hermitage, is in the northern part of the county. I've only been there once, but it is a beautiful place to walk around, etc. And the one time I was there, it was only for a very short visit. You really need 3 or 4 hours to make a thorough visit.

I guess I was thinking more along the lines of things you could do or buy in the US that you can't do or buy (with reasonable practicality) in Britain.
 

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If it were me I would be most pleased to be in people's houses.

US homes are quite different to UK ones, I expect the gardens are too. When I've been abroad the nicest part has always been when I've been among the natives in their own social life. The tourist attractions and scenery are awesome, but it's the people that make it special.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by mushroom

Joe, I may be interested in getting a pen pal...but I don't understand what the 25 pounds is for...
I am not trying to defend it, but the site does say:

Quote:
Although the emphasis is very much on the individual relationship between pen friend and prisoner, and there is no obligation to play an active part in the organisation, many letter-writers feel somewhat isolated to begin with. They therefore value contact with others to share the difficulties and rewards of the correspondence. This they do through the LifeLines conferences, the quarterly newsletter and with other LifeLiners. There is also a team of experienced counsellors to whom letter-writers can turn for support. Above all, the information and support provided by the state coordinators is a particularly important aspect of the way LifeLines works.
It costs money to run any organization. 25 pounds is what? About $37.50? It costs $35 for a normal annual EarthSave membership. I think it costs me $40 or so for my membership in the League of Women Voters, or something like that.

Many organizations have reduced-rate memberships for students, the elderly, or persons otherwise unable to afford the full cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by spud

If it were me I would be most pleased to be in people's houses.

US homes are quite different to UK ones, I expect the gardens are too. When I've been abroad the nicest part has always been when I've been among the natives in their own social life. The tourist attractions and scenery are awesome, but it's the people that make it special.
Hi, spud. I was hoping you would contribute to this thread.


I am hoping that my British expatriate friend Melanie, who lives about three miles from me, will be able to have them to dinner one Saturday night. We discussed it somewhat, but she might have some conflicting obligations.

I am taking them to a luncheon at the home of Nashville's premiere vegan chef, but that is a very modest rented duplex.

The Hermitage, former President Jackson's home, has a magnificent garden and grounds. I might try to pop up there with them for a visit if time and weather allow.

BTW, they are staying at a guest house owned by Prison Reconciliation Ministries. This is a small house right on the edge of an industrial area in Nashville. Hardly any yard to speak of. The kind of housing for the poor that you might expect a prison ministry to be able to afford.
 

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Probably many Uk homes would be considered modest by US standards, especially spacewise. Eg, our living room is 15' x 11' in size. We don't have a garage or a basement. The master bedroom is 11' x 11'. Millions of people live in terraced houses that are 100 years old with just 2, or 2 and a half bedrooms and a kitchen that is 8' x 8'.

I follwed the links and found it an absorbing read.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mary and Jean are here in Nashville.

I had lunch with them at Amerigo's on Friday. Kind of a swanky place. I think I had only been there once before. It was very nice but somewhat pricey.

The dinner at Melanie's house fell through. Put together a dine out instead at a local restaurant called The Bound'ry. I made reservations for 8, but 3 people cancelled, so we only had five. It was a nice, quiet dinner though. It was Jean's birthday the other day, so I brought her a Dixie Chicks cd--I had an extra copy, it wasn't really intended as a political statement, but ...

Jean was driving so abstained from alcohol. Mary found some sort of vanilla flavored beer, which she liked. Jean tells me that they do drink beer cold in the UK, as well as at room temp sometimes. I had thought that all Britons drank room temp beer.

We will be having them to a luncheon on Wednesday and maybe to a second luncheon on Tuesday, April 15.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Joe

Jean tells me that they do drink beer cold in the UK, as well as at room temp sometimes. I had thought that all Britons drank room temp beer.

arrgggh. Yuk. Warm beer, no way. Draught bitter and pale ale is cellar temperature, not room temperature. Dahn sahf anyway.

We keep our tins and bottles of beer in the fridge


Joe, you just have to visit England.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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Originally posted by spud

arrgggh. Yuk. Warm beer, no way. Draught bitter and pale ale is cellar temperature, not room temperature.
Ok, thanks for the correction.

By the way, irony of ironies, Mary and Jean leave foggy, rainy London and come to Nashville, in the Southern USA, only to catch head colds!

I feel sorry for them, of course. I guess their immune systems are not used to American germs.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Joe



Put together a dine out instead at a local restaurant called The Bound'ry.
I ate there last time I was in Nashville. They have some killer breads. Not sure what all was veg*n, but good. Wish I could remember what I had there...it was something kind of strange for me, but damn tasty. (I was 3 sheets to the wind later that night, so I have a little trouble remembering the early parts of the evening.)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Joe



I feel sorry for them, of course. I guess their immune systems are not used to American germs.
No I bet it was something they got on the plane... I often seem to get on a plane healthy and get off it with a cold.

Hmm. SARS... [joke
sorry]
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Tame

I ate there [The Bound'ry] last time I was in Nashville. They have some killer breads. Not sure what all was veg*n, but good. Wish I could remember what I had there...it was something kind of strange for me, but damn tasty. (I was 3 sheets to the wind later that night, so I have a little trouble remembering the early parts of the evening.)
If you ever come to Nashville again, let me know in advance. I just have to meet you.


The Bound'ry's menu is more than 90 percent omni, but they do have several vegetarian selections, so it is on our Veg "dine out" list.

They have a website, so maybe this will trigger a few memories:

http://boundry.citysearch.com/

It is supposed to be something of a "singles" place, particularly on Friday and Saturday nights. We went on a Sunday night, when it was half-empty. But everyone enjoyed the place and the food.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by spud

No I bet it was something they got on the plane... I often seem to get on a plane healthy and get off it with a cold.

That could be. Planes pack a lot of people in a confined space for hours and seem to be almost an ideal mechanism for transmitting airborne infections.
 
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