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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
we are animal lovers, and have been long before we were veg*n, we have a house full of animals whom we love a great deal. my husband volunteers at an animal shelter, we see on a regular basis the number of abandoned animals who are forced to the streets because the families who wanted them, now no longer feel a need for them.

So this issue is huge for us. it tears on our heart strings. recently we were wanting to add to our home, by finding a small lap dog, because the dog we owned was rather large. in looking for a smaller dog we found just how poorly dogs are treated in "puppy mills" and we were incredibly disgusted with what happens to them.

We ended up adopting a beautiful and loving little daschund who was breed by her family, and at the rip old age of two, the family decided they no longer wanted her. She was turned over to a shelter seriously infected with heartworms, and close to her death bed because of it. we took this little girl in, and have now brought her to good health, but it really disgusts us to think of how poorly she had been treated before this.

now that we are more of a part of the vegieboards, we just really need to know that you understand what happens to pure bread animals, and that you know how wrong it is.

Please tell us what you think.

Just giving my opinion.

Thank you so very much!!!!
 

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The major problem that I have with breeding is that breeders are adding to the overpopulation problem. If someone wants a pure breed they can simply find a rescue society for that breed of dog. For instance there are Pug Rescue societies......if someone wanted a Pug they can call these people and get hooked up. This whole dogs and cats as "pets" thing never should have happened to begin with. I have dogs and cats myself...its better than having them be homeless or killed by a shelter...or in an abusive home. But people should be doing everything in their power to control this overpopulation problem, and breeding is hurting it more than anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree the over population is a real horrible problem, but in looking for a smaller dog, we had our eyes opened to what takes place in "puppy mills". Its very similar to what takes place on egg laying chicken farms. Its really horrible.

The over population is such a heart breaking thing. I know people that catch, fixed, and release stray cats, that are to "wild" to be house trained. This program is great, and can help alot. It's so incredibly important that people understand the need to have thier pet fixed.

In my very strong opinion, anyone who condons the breeding of cats, dogs, ect. is only contributing to the problem, and cannot pretend to be an animal lover. Also, anyone who would "BUY" an pet from any of these "Love is a Puppy" stores, or petshops, is again only contributing to the horrible treatment these dogs indure at the puppy mills. I will not even shop at a petshop that sells cats or dogs.

I guess like everything else we talk about on these boards, its important to be informed, and understand just what the situations are, before you make a choice that can contribute in a manner you would not support.

Again, just my opinion. I hope you all feel free to reply in aggreement with me, or not.
 

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there's an elderly man in Ottawa that i saw on some show about pets, there's this little fenced in park where all the stray and wild cats hang out, there's shelter there and everything for them, and this guy goes in a couple times a day and feeds them all and spends time with them. they also bring them in to be spayed/neutered, i'm guessing a vet must volunteer their time to do it.

it's pretty cool and apparantly a lot of people like to hang out there and watch the cats. but you gotta wonder if anyone will be willing to take over that job when he can't do it anymore
 

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I think the majority of people that were former vegweb members know how awful buying from pet factories (whether they are private or someplace like PetSmart). It's a little comforting to know that there are lots of people out there that don't buy puppies from a mill. Hopefully, eventually, when the demand becomes so very low, they will stop breeding them. There are enough 'unwanted' pets in this world. We don't need anymore.

Thanks for sharing.
 

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Our boy Jak came from akita rescue. His former owner bought him from a pet store, but when he was 11 months old they discovered he had entropian eyes and would require surgery. They were not willing to pay for the surgery so they turned him over to rescue. We paid for the surgery and several more since than. Again, the idea is not to buy from pet stores, but I do believe there are so many people that do not know what happens to these animals. Whenever I get the chance I try to educate people about this. Sometimes people get upset with me, but I think as animal lovers it is our duty to do this.
 

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LOL Kpickell!


I volunteer at the local humane society, so I think it's pretty obvious how I feel about breeders and pet factories and the like. Makes me want to
 

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I completely agree with everything said here, except for one problem. my husband is EXTREMELY allergic to cats. my kitty who recently died was bought from a breeder because she was a Sphynx (hairless and extremely hypoallergenic). when i am through with the grieving process, I will most likely buy another kitty from a hairless cat breeder. I think this is justifiable because I can give the cat a good life, and without this option I'd be catless
I think its sick that people breed cats to have a certain "look" or fur color. but when it comes to allergies, thats a different story. my husband hates allergy meds and meds in general, hence my choice.

XOXO

beth
 

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you can also contact your local shelters and have them put you on a waiting list to adopt a hairless cat. You'd be surprised what we get in, and whenever someone calls with an unwanted animal we check our want lists to see if anyone is looking for that type or breed.
 

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shelters get exotic breeds all the time

same with vet offices... you should let your vet know that youre interested and why that you would rather adopt then purchase from a breeder and they will definitely think about you when/if they get one in

i dont know where you live but there might even be a cat specific rescue group that you could also contact

also, why dont you think about rescuing a dog from a shelter

just thinking about how most breeders treat their animals, i cant even imagine getting one from a breeder...

and even worse you are paying for a life... is that life really worth what you paid?

and then you are supporting and helping someone make their living off of animal exploitation

sorry if i sound harsh... its like 7am or something

Caroline
 

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responsible breeders treat their animals very well....

but i'd definetely check with the shelters first because I'd rather save a life than pay to bring more into the world if at all possible. they do get expensive breeds in quite frequently, and the adoption fee is the same regardless of breed usually
 

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I've done both, adopted from the SPCA and bought from a breeder.

My SPCA adoption is a pure bred dalmatian named ELVIS!! He was at the SPCA on three different occasions for several LAME reasons. He really only suffered from separation anxiety, and his former families didn't have the patience to work through it. I attempted to work through it with training and reinforcement, but found that a buddy was probably the best option. SO, I started my quest. I checked the local shelters for other dals and came up empty (by this time I'd really become fond of the breed).

I discovered a dalmatian breeder in a local paper and thought it might be nice to raise a puppy along side Elvis and they'd be great company and play mates.

I was horrified when I got to the "breeder's" house. The sire, dame, and two litter mates shared a 10'x10' outdoor chain link pen. They were infested with fleas, ticks, and had several open wounds from fighting for food and attention. The two "puppies" were actually 9 months old. I had to take one of them. I just couldn't bear to think that this AKC registered breeder was treating animals so poorly. I would have taken both of them, but my husband at the time had limits.

I now have 9 year old Elvis and 5 year old Ellie that are fast friends and a true joy in my life. Not for a moment do I regret "buying" that dog from that particular "breeder."

However, I'm quick to jump when I hear someone talk about buying a pure bred dog from a breeder. My knee jerk reaction is, there are so many wonderful animals at the shelters, please check there first. Sadly enough, a lot of those dogs in the shelters started out in some breeder's litter.

I suppose my point really is, if you're interested in showing or competition and good breeding is important, do your home work, get your animal from a reputable place and be strong when you're looking into the eyes of an 8 week old adorable creature. If you don't have the committment or patience to train and care for an animal, don't support breeders.

If you want a companion, go to your shelter and save a life. Take home an older dog that just wants to be comfortable and warm, and occasionally get a belly scratch.

Whether you buy a pure bred dog, or adopt one from a shelter, there's no guarantee that the purchased dog will be any better than the adopted dog. As a matter of fact, my older SPCA dog has always been better than the "breeder" dog.

Sorry for the ramble....
 

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As a rescuer, just curious about other people's insights:

Assuming that a breeder treated all their animals well, placed them all in carefully screened loving homes (perhaps even having them neutered first), and pretending for the moment that there was no overpopulation problem:

Would anyone here consider breeding for the purpose of improving companion animals' health, through genetic screening and selection, to be a worthy cause?
 

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Lenore, I haven't posted in this thread because I know my views would be met with hostility, but yes. I think it is a worthy cause. There are people here that believe companion animals should be phased out but I am not one of them.

I also want to get involved with native animal and dog rescue when I have a place.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Lenore

Assuming that a breeder treated all their animals well, placed them all in carefully screened loving homes (perhaps even having them neutered first), and pretending for the moment that there was no overpopulation problem:

Would anyone here consider breeding for the purpose of improving companion animals' health, through genetic screening and selection, to be a worthy cause?
Man, talk about a hypothetical situation!! That would never happen. I mean it's almost an oxymoron to say "healthy purebreed". If that's why they tell you're their breeding their dogs then it's pure BS.
 

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Lenore, I also believe that it would be a worthy cause. I, for one, think that the extinction of companion animals would be an incredible loss.
 
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