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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How in the world do those bread companies make white bread so frekin fluffy? I have made bread in the bread maker as well as a loaf pan, and it is never the same! Should I add vital wheat gluten? What about wheat? Thanks, I want some really big loafs! Vegan bread here cost 4 bucks, and money in my house is negative
 

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Adding gluten to your bread flour will help some.

When you make bread from scratch the trick to getting great texture is in the kneading. You need to do it well and do it a long time. If you're kneading by hand, I can pretty much guarantee you can't over-knead (if by mixer dough hook though - this is possible). Put all your weight into the kneading - by kneading you're developing the gluten in the flour.

When you think you've kneaded enough - form the dough into a flattish ball with a smooth top. Run your hand across the top - and give it a poke. Does it feel and have the geveral texture of a babies bottom? If so - let it rise!
(also - when you poke the dough it should bounce back into place......and hopefully the skin on a babies bottom will too hahaha).

Hey, also make sure you use warm liquid (not too warm though)

Oh yes - don't use old yeast

There are other factors and tips.

Try and get a bread baking book or video from the library. Never mind the ingredients - just pay attention to technique.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Then why was my bread too sticky, I mean I added more flour, then it would get powedery dry, then a little water, then it wa ssicky, so I ended up using the sticky version. Is more flour the key to the stickyness?

Oh, I do need to need more then, I only did it like 3 mins, and I did not even put my weight into it. Oops.
 

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Some quick tips:

Water should be between 105-115 degrees, Use a thermometer to be sure.

Knead, knead, knead
A typical 2 loaf (6 cup flour) recipe should get 600 strokes!

Make sure your bread pans are the correct size. 8x4 is correct for a 3 cup flour loaf, larger and you will get flatish loaves.

Your rising and proofing should be in a draft free spot that is in the mid 70's temp wise. Too hot and you will get a fast rise, overworked yeast beasties and a fallen loaf. Too cool and you will get underproofed loaves that are heavy and wet.

Don't omit the salt
Lot's of people do, thinking it will make the bread healthier, but salt is necessary to condition the loaf, and I also recommend some sort of fat, 2 tbls per 6 cup recipe is about right.

Try and stick to the amounts in the recipes, do not adjust consistency with lots of flour or water, you'll mess up the proportions. Get a spatula or scraper to help get past the sticky stage, a properly kneaded loaf will pull together without lots of adjustments.

Measure correctly!! Liquid measure for liquids, dry for dry ingredients. Stir the flour before you use it and lightly spoon it into the cups before leveling off.

Bake frequently. Practice will help you develop into a consistent baker. If you can, get the Laurel's Kitchen Bread book. I consider it a must have for whole grain baking. There are many vegan recipes in it, and the other recipes are easily adjusted to become so. Their guides are invaluable for beginning bakers, imo.

Lisa
 

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The flour in bread will be a high-gluten flur. Gluten is a stringy protein thingy that makes bread fluffy. High amounts of gluten are what distinguished biscuits from cookies, in addition to the acidity of the mixture. (The more acidic, the more fluffy it will be.) That is why you will see sveral additives in bread. Flour improvers probably do this, such as l-cysteine. However, in some bread, vitamin C is is used. This is because vitamin is ascorbic acid, and the acidity in the bread will be increased, therefore making it more fluffy.

When you make your bread, you may want to add some kind of acid to the bread, like lemon juice or vinegar. (Not a lot though!!) i've heard of it being done. Alternatively, you can sweeten the bread and fluff it up with brown sugar, which is slightly more acidic than white sugar. However, commercially, ascorbic acid will be used. If you add vinegar or lemon juice, you can expect the taste to be affected. So if you like the flavour of the bread, then don't addd anything to it and accept the texture, or if you wish for the texture to change but don't mind subtle flavour changes, try experimenting with adding acidic substances to your bread in small quantities, such as brown sugar, vnegar or lemon juice.
 
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